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Calendar of Events

2019 - 2020 Events

Tokeya Graham (English/Philosophy): Friday, September 13, 12-12:50 p.m., in 8-200 

Associate Professor Tokeya C. Graham (ENG/PHL) teaches English at MCC’s Downtown Campus. She is very active in campus life, including being the advisor for Black Student Union at the Downtown Campus and most recently serving on the President’s Expanded Cabinet and on the Creative Writing Committee. Professor Graham participates in various college and community initiatives where she has received many awards for her academic expertise as well as her community service. In addition to teaching English, Graham is an equity and inclusion strategist who works with organizations to cultivate powerful change. For her Filling Station presentation, she will deliver a talk called “James Baldwin’s America: Race and Modern Society.” According to Graham: “James Baldwin’s writings offer an unflinching look into America’s complicated history dealing (and not dealing) with race. This presentation will highlight Baldwin’s words as commentary on what ailed America then and what still ails it now, almost 50 years later. This conversation is intended to spark thoughtful dialogue about racial progress and what it will take to cultivate an inclusive society.” 


Visiting Poet: t’ai freedom ford
Reading and Book Signing
Thursday, October 03, 2019
7:00 p.m.
R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center
Warshof Conference Center, Monroe A
Free and Open to the Public

Poetry Workshop
Friday, October 04, 2019
12-12:50 p.m.
Building 8, Room 200
Free and Open to the MCC Community

t'ai freedom ford is a New York City high school English teacher and Cave Canem Fellow. Her poetry, fiction, and essays have appeared in the African American Review, Apogee, Bomb Magazine, Calyx, Drunken Boat, Electric Literature, Gulf Coast, Kweli, Obsidian, Poetry, Tin House, and others. Her work has also been featured in several anthologies including The BreakBeat Poets: New American Poetry in the Age of Hip-Hop and Nepantla: An Anthology Dedicated to Queer Poets of Color. Her first collection, how to get over, won the 2015 To the Lighthouse Poetry Prize, published by Red Hen Press. In 2018, she won a Face Out Emerging Writers Award from the Community of Literary Magazines & Presses. t'ai lives and loves in Brooklyn, where she is an editor at No, Dear Magazine .


Steven Farrington (World Languages and Cultures): Friday, October 18, 12-12:50 p.m., in 8-200 

Steven Farrington is an Assistant Professor of French, Spanish, and Italian. He is from Hilton, NY but has travelled to many countries and is passionate about writing, ideas, and Romance Languages and literatures. He especially is interested in LGBT literature and film from France and Spain.  He is also the author of Rodrigo's Land, which is a historical fiction novel. Professor Farrington’s love of Spanish literature will be clearly evident in his Filling Station presentation, which will focus on Luis Cernuda, one of the most prominent members of the world-famous “Generation of ‘27” writers to have emerged from Spain circa 1923-1927. Farrington will address ways in which Cernuda’s status as cultural outsider is reflected in his poetry. According to Farrington: “Sometimes this took the form of feeling like an outsider looking in on his family; sometimes, he felt like an outsider as a gay atheist in heavily conservative and Catholic Spain; in still other moments, his poetry reflects the sadness of being an exile in both Britain and later in the US following the Spanish Civil War.”


Visiting Fiction Writer: Brian Wood
Fiction Reading and Book Signing
Thursday, November 14, 2019
7:00 p.m.
R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center
Warshof Conference Center, Monroe A
Free and Open to the Public

Fiction Workshop
Friday, November 15, 2019
12-12:50 p.m.    
Building 8, Room 200
Free and Open to the MCC Community

Brian Wood holds an MFA in Creative Writing from San Jose State University. He has served as the Managing Editor of Reed Magazine, as well as Fiction Editor for POST. His work earned him a Ludwig Scholarship for Excellence in Creative Writing, as well as James Phelan Awards for Short Fiction and Familiar Essays. Most recently, his story collection Joytime Killbox was a finalist for the BOA Editions Short Fiction Prize. He also has ghostwritten five published books.


Bill Drumright (History): Friday, December 06, 12-12:50 p.m., in 8-200 

Bill Drumright is an Associate Professor of History at Monroe Community College, where he has worked since January of 2003. He received his Ph.D. in History in May of 2005 from the University of Tennessee/Knoxville, with a specialty in 20th Century United States History (the New Deal/World War II era). For his Filling Station presentation, Professor Drumright will reflect upon the research and writing of his dissertation, “A River for War, A Watershed to Change: The Tennessee Valley Authority During World War II.” Specifically, he will consider what could be called “the ‘presentness’ of the past.” That is, how conducting historical research and writing in one's present affects how one reconstructs past historical events—especially those events that occurred before the historian was born.


Marisol Galarza-Ruiz: Friday, February 7, 12-12:50 p.m. in 8-200

Professor Marisol Galarza-Ruiz (World Languages and Cultures) teaches Spanish at Monroe Community College, where she also serves as faculty advisor to the Downtown Spanish Club. A long-time volunteer with several organizations serving the Latino community, Professor Galarza-Ruiz became a 2019 Community College Internationalization Fellow from Cornell University's Latin American Studies Program. For her Filling Station presentation, Galarza-Ruiz will discuss her views and experiences surrounding relief efforts in Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in 2017. As Galarza-Ruiz notes, "Over 3 million Americans who live on the island of Puerto Rico face a lingering economic crisis, government bankruptcy, and a recent major political scandal." Under Galarza-Ruiz's leadership, MCC participated in the NY stands with Puerto Rico Recovery and Rebuilding Initiative, which is an ongoing collaboration between the NY state governor's office, SUNY, and UNICEF. According to Galarza-Ruiz: “This initiative pledges to send 500 students and staff from SUNY to help in the reconstruction of Puerto Rico. MCC was the only community college to lead a group in 2018 and had the opportunity again in 2019 to lead another group."


Visiting Playwright: Nathan Yungerberg
Reading and Book-Signing
Thursday, February 13, 2020
7:00 p.m.
R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center
Warshof Conference Center, Monroe B
Free and Open to the Public

Playwriting Workshop
Friday, February 14, 2020
12-12:50 p.m.
Building 8, Room 200
Free and Open to the MCC Community

Nathan Yungerberg is a Brooklyn-based playwright. His plays include Esai’s Table, The Son of Dawn, Pousada Azul, Orchids and Polka Dots, Seven Pools of Lebanon, and Isosceles. Nathan’s work has been developed or featured by The Cherry Lane Theatre (2017 Mentor Project with Stephen Adly Guirgis), Roundabout Theatre Company, The Playwrights’ Center, JAG Productions, Crowded Fire Theater, Lorraine Hansberry Theater, The Lark, The Fire This Time Festival, 48 Hours in Harlem, Climate Change Theatre Action, The National Black Theatre, The August Wilson Red Door Project, The Bushwick Starr, and BBC Radio Afternoon Drama. Nathan is one of seven black playwrights commissioned by The New Black Fest for HANDS UP: 7 Playwrights, 7 Testaments which was published by Samuel French. Awards and honors: The 2016 O’Neill National Playwrights Conference (Semifinalist), Ken Davenport 10-Minute Play Festival (Winner), 2019 Djerassi Resident Artist, and 2019 Headlands Center for the Arts Artist in Residence.


Visiting Nonfiction Writer: Jaquira Díaz
Reading and Book-Signing
Thursday, February 27, 2020
7:00 p.m.
R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center
Warshof Conference Center, Monroe B
Free and Open to the Public

Creative Nonfiction Workshop
Friday, February 28, 2020
12-12:50 p.m.
Building 8, Room 200
Free and Open to the MCC Community

Jaquira Díaz is the author of Ordinary Girls, a memoir, and I Am Deliberate, a novel, both forthcoming from Algonquin Books. She’s the recipient of two Pushcart Prizes, an Elizabeth George Foundation Grant, and fellowships from the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, Kenyon Review, and The MacDowell Colony. Her work appears in The Best American Essays, Rolling Stone, The Guardian, The FADER, Longreads, T: The New York Times Style Magazine, and others. She teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s MFA Program in Creative Writing and is a Consulting Editor at the Kenyon Review.  


 Jonathon Little: Friday, March 6, 12-12:50 p.m. in 8-200 

Jonathon Little is an Associate Professor of Geography at MCC where he teaches a number of Physical Geography and Geospatial Technology courses. He coordinates the Geospatial Information Science & Technology (GIST) Certificate and is the Principal Investigator (PI) of a SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grant to develop remote workforce opportunities and a virtual desktop. He was the PI for a National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education grant to develop a GIST Certificate program and create a workforce pipeline between high schools and the college. He is a Board Member of a local GIS organization and the New York Geographic Alliance, serves on the NY state GIS Education committee, and is the National Geographic New York State Steward. He traveled to Kazakhstan as a Fulbright Specialist June of 2019 where he trained faculty on remote sensing. For his Filling Station presentation, Little says he will "share his experience in Kazakhstan and will discuss other global-based initiatives." Moreover, he will be "implementing remote workforce opportunities for Geospatial Information Science & Technology (GIST) and Geography students in Colombia, Kazakhstan, and Costa Rica spring of 2020."


Mike Jacobs: Friday, April 17, 12-12:50 p.m. in 8-200 

Dr. Michael Jacobs is Dean, Humanities and Social Sciences at MCC and Executive Deputy Director of the Community College Humanities Association. Before becoming an administrator, he taught literature, writing, and film at Berkeley College in New York City (where he served as English Department Chair) and New York University. His research and scholarship largely focus on modernist documentary literature. For Filling Station, Jacobs will deliver a presentation called "What's Old is New Again: Radical Journalism in 20th Century America." In his own words: "In the 1960s and 70s, a new breed of journalist rose to prominence in the United States. Dubbed the "New Journalists," these writers' inventive, often subversive and irreverent approach to both representing reality and communicating the humanity of their subjects infused their work with a range of literary devices; consequently, their writing often reads more like fiction than journalism. This presentation explores seminal works of New Journalism from writers such as Norman Mailer, Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Hunter S. Thompson, and Tom Wolfe, as well as the sociopolitical and cultural conditions that gave rise to the form. It also challenges the idea that the New Journalism was completely new by examining its origins within an established tradition of literary nonfiction developed during the Great Depression--a tradition that had somehow been forgotten in a single generation."