Course Descriptions

The following is a complete listing of courses offered at MCC. You can also visit our Programs of Study page for a list of course requirements necessary to complete your degree.

AAD - Applied Art and Design
ACC - Accounting
ACD - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency
AGS - Agricultural Studies
ANT - Anthropology
ARA - Arabic/Foreign Language
ART - Art
ASL - American Sign Language/Foreign Language
ATP - Automotive Technology
BIO - Biology
BIO 114 - Natural History of Greater Rochester - WR

3 Credits

Teaches the basic biological concepts through an experience-based approach. Field trips will be held at local sites of geological and biological interest. Topics covered will include: identification of woody plants, wildflowers, insects, birds and mushrooms; the ecology of fields, woods and wetlands; and bedrock and glacial geology. Two class hours, two laboratory hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify and describe selected types of wildflowers, woody plants, invertebrates, birds and other vertebrates, and mushrooms found in natural habitats in the Rochester area.
2. Using examples from class field trips, explain several community and ecosystem processes including food web structure/function, nutrient cycling, and ecological succession.
3. Describe the factors (e.g. climate, geology, soils, human influence) that determine the biotic communities found in different natural habitats in the Rochester area.
4. Describe adaptations of living organisms that allow them to tolerate a range of environmental conditions (including changes in temperature, moisture and light).
5. Summarize, through writing and discussion, observations and interpretations made during class filed trips to different habitat types.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 116 - Introduction to Environmental Science

3 Credits

A course which deals with biological aspects of humans and their impact on the environment. Students will study ecological principles that govern the world and will examine current environmental problems and issues. They will develop a greater awareness of global interdependence and the role of individuals in affecting environmental issues. This course is designed for the career or non-science student. Two class hours, two laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Illustrate ecological principles with specific examples.
2. Generate accurate data in the laboratory or field.
3. Interpret information from graphs.
4. Convey information through graphs.
5. Explain examples of environmental connections on a global scale.
6. Appraise current environmental conditions and concerns.
7. Describe how the decisions made and actions taken by individuals, governments, producers, or consumers affect the environment.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 117 - Basic Consumer Nutrition

3 Credits

A lecture course that will present information on nutrients and their use by the body. Topics include digestion, usage of nutrients, consequences of nutrient deficiencies or excesses, energy production and analysis of individual diets. Current research is integrated into the course. Depending on program requirements, this course can meet both Food Service (FSA 117) or Natural Science (BIO 117) elective or course requirement. A student may earn credit for BIO 117 or FSA 117, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify the six nutrient classes.
2. Identify the general chemical structure of selected nutrient classes.
3. Explain the role of selected nutrient classes in the human body.
4. Explain some of the uses of the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs), food guides, or dietary guidelines.
5. Explain some of the limitations of the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs), food guides, or dietary guidelines.
6. Interpret nutritional values of similar food products using label information.
7. Describe the digestion of nutrients.
8. Describe the absorption of nutrients.
9. Evaluate the percentage of lean body mass based on a set of standards.
10. Discuss how percentage of body fat is determined.
11. Evaluate the percentage of body fat based on a set of standards.
12. Describe optimal methods for weight gain.
13. Describe optimal methods for weight loss.
14. Evaluate popular diets.
15. Describe deficiency or toxicity symptoms of selected vitamins and minerals.
16. Evaluate current nutrition issues from a scientific perspective to distinguish fact from fallacy.
17. Analyze current food intake critically, using recommendations from scientific, health-related organizations.
18. Develop a personal diet plan based on a critical analysis of current food intake and recommendations from scientific, health-related organizations.
19. Identify essential food safety principles for preventing food-borne illness.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 118 - Practical Botany

3 Credits

A basic course emphasizing the significance and use of plants. Studies include simplified plant anatomy and physiology, propagation, cultivation and use of plants for food, landscaping and other purposes. This course is designed for the career or non-science student. Two class hours, two laboratory hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe the basic structure and function of the vascular plant body and explain mechanisms of plant reproduction.
2. Identify selected groups and species of plants.
3. Discuss several groups of plants used for food and commercial purposes.
4. Explain methods and techniques used to grow and propagate plants.
5. Provide examples of algae and fungi and explain their importance.

Course Offered Spring only

BIO 120 - Essentials of Life Science

4 Credits

An introduction to selected principles of the biological sciences explored through current topics in biology. Areas of study will include the organization of life, cell structure and function, DNA structure and heredity, biodiversity, evolution, and ecology. This course is designed for the career or non-science student. Three class hours, two laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. List the general characteristics of living organisms.
2. Describe the levels of organization in biological systems.
3. Identify and describe the general steps in the scientific method.
4. Identify and describe the major groups of biological molecules.
5. Differentiate between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
6. Describe the process of cell division.
7. Explain Mendelian genetics and other laws of inheritance.
8. Explain the role of DNA and RNA in protein synthesis, which may include the nature of mutations and their role in genetic variation.
9. Describe the diversity of ecosystems, which may include the interaction of organisms within those systems.
10. Describe the fundamental importance of evolution as a unifying concept in biology.
11. Discuss the importance of biodiversity, which may include a survey of the kingdoms with specific organisms from each.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 123 - Nutrition for Sport and Exercise

3 Credits

Sports nutrition combines the fields of nutrition and exercise physiology. The student will learn which type of foods, beverages, and/or supplements are needed for optimal performance in sporting events. The student will gain practical experience on how nutrition plays a role in how the body functions and performs during sporting events. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify the energy-yielding nutrients used by the body.
2. Explain how the energy-yielding nutrients are used by the body during various intensity exercises.
3. Distinguish between evidence-based research and non-peer-reviewed articles as it pertains to nutrition in exercise.
4. Describe energy intake, expenditure, and recommendations as it relates to energy balance of athletes.
5. Describe the effect of exercise on fluid balance and outline strategies for maintaining fluid balance before, during, and after exercise.
6. Describe the loss, intake, and recommendations for minerals, vitamins, and supplements for athletes.
7. Describe exercise, weight, and body composition as it relates to performance, health, and disease.
8. Describe nutritional periodization and how it pertains to sports nutrition.
9. Describe the science behind sports nutrition recommendations based on research evidence, research design, and consensus opinion.
10. Describe macronutrient recommendations for athletes including specific guidelines for intake before, during, and after exercise.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 132 - Laboratory to Accompany Human Biology

1 Credit

Laboratory exercises in human anatomy and physiology to supplement BIO 133 class lectures and text information. Bio 132 is a late start, 10 week course that has 3 lab hours per week. NOTE: This course only meets SUNY General Education Natural Science requirements when both BIO 132 and BIO 133 are successfully completed. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 133.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate the ability to use the scientific method in the Human Machine laboratory setting.
2. Conduct scientific experiments related to human biology topics.
3. Collect and analyze data from scientific experiments related to human body topics.
4. Summarize results from scientific experiments related to human biology topics in laboratory exercises or reports.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 133 - Human Biology

3 Credits

A study of the structure and function of the human body. The cause and effects of certain diseases are also included. The course is designed for the career or non-science student. NOTE: Students who successfully complete BIO 133 may, with the addition of BIO 132, complete the requirement for SUNY Natural Science General Education (SUNY-NS). BIO 132 may be taken concurrently or in a later semester, but the student will not have satisfied the SUNY-NS requirement until both BIO 132 and BIO 133 are successfully completed. Three class hours in lecture/laboratory demonstration formats.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate through reading, writing or labeling a diagram knowledge of the names and function of the critical structures at a cellular and system level for each of the biological systems.
2. Identify the controlled variable, sensor, controller, communication routes and effector mechanisms in several homeostatic systems such as body temperature, blood glucose, blood pressure, body water, body salt content, blood pH and an Endocrine System.
3. Identify the major biologically important chemicals in both written and simple chemical notation and describe their functional roles in the body.
4. Identify the roles of diffusion, osmosis, active transport and fluid flow via a pressure gradient in various effector systems and relate these to specific anatomical structures.
5. Briefly describe the mechanisms and structures involved in the processing, storage, and metabolism to either structure or energy of the basic dietary compounds.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 134 - Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I

3 Credits

The study of the structure and function of cells (including metabolism), tissues, integument, and musculoskeletal, nervous, and sensory systems. Designed for students enrolled in the Dental Hygiene, Health Information Management, and Physical Education programs. Also open to interested Liberal Arts students with some biology background. Two class hours and three laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite: High school Biology with a grade of C or better, or any laboratory-based Biology course numbered 120 or higher with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Diagram a general model of a negative feedback system, illustrating its role in maintaining homeostasis.
2. Describe the relationships between atoms and molecules, including bonding and their importance to the study of anatomy and physiology.
3. Describe the general roles played in living cells by the various categories of biochemical compounds.
4. Name, locate, and describe the function(s) of the major structures found in a cell.
5. Name and describe the various types of processes involved in transport across a cell membrane.
6. Describe the role of nucleic acids and the cytoplasm in cell reproduction and protein synthesis.
7. Name and briefly describe the major anabolic and catabolic pathways involved in the cell metabolism of the major categories of biochemical compounds.
8. Name and describe the organs/structures and state the overall functions (including operations of the various components and homeostatic mechanisms involved in the operation of) of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and sensory systems.
9. Name the various adult tissues types, the respective subcategories, and identify locations where they may be found in the body.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 135 - Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II

3 Credits

A continuation of BIO 134. Includes the study of the structure and function of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Two class hours and three laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite: BIO 134, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the concept and application of the scientific method.
2. Read and use data presented in graphs and tables of physiological data
3. Explain gross and micro anatomical structures and functional roles of the following bodily systems: Endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive.
4. Use the concepts of homeostasis and feedback control appropriately within the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems.
5. Demonstrate an understanding of, and relationship between, the basic chemical, biochemical, and physical concepts within the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems.
6. Collect measurements of simple physiological data and relate it/them to function(s) within the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, digestive, and reproductive systems.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 136 - Introductory Forensic Science

4 Credits

This is an introductory natural science course designed for the non-science, primarily criminal justice, major. The course will cover those biological and chemical fundamentals necessary for the student to understand topics of instrumentation and techniques employed in a crime laboratory. Topics such as matter, atomic theory, chemical bonding, chromatography, hair and fiber examination, blood and drug analysis, toxicology, and DNA typing will be included. The laboratory will include demonstrations and hands-on activities of methods used to study chemical and biological evidence. This course complements the existing CRJ 209 course which emphasizes the investigative procedures involved at the crime scene. A student may earn credit for BIO 136 or CHE 136, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses. Three class hours, three laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite:MCC LEVEL 6 MATHEMATICS PLACEMENT OR MTH 098 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF C

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain the importance of measurements,their conversions, and their use in the metric system. Describe the structure and composition of DNA. Explain DNA replication and gene expression in the determining protein structure.
2. Be able to apply biological and chemical principles and the scientific method to forensic science.
3. Describe the basic concepts of matter, atoms,elements,chemical bonding, molecules,and chemical formulas.
4. Identify and describe types of biological molecules and their functions.
5. Describe basic cell structure and function and apply to different cell types.
6. Describe the structure and composition of DNA. Explain DNA replication and gene expression in the determining protein structure.
7. Describe the role of DNA in analyzing forensic trace evidence.
8. Explain the basic theory behind the instrumentation and techniques employed in the analysis of crime scene evidence.
9. Be able to analyze biological and chemical data collected from analytical instrumentation and draw conclusions with regards to crime scene evidence.

Course Offered Fall only

BIO 144 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

4 Credits

The first course of a 2-semester comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include body organization, homeostasis, cells and tissues, integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and special senses. Laboratory study includes microscope work, substantial organ and animal dissection, and experiments designed to illustrate normal function and physiologic responses to specific stresses. Designed for students in Nursing, Radiologic Technology and other health related programs. Three class hours, three laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

A grade of C or better in a college biology course with lab (BIO 120, BIO 132/133, BIO 155) or a C or better in high school biology, in addition to a C or better in a college chemistry course (CHE 100, CHE 124, CHE 145, or CHE 151) or a C or better in high school chemistry.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Use appropriate terminology related to human anatomy in selected organ systems.
2. Use appropriate terminology related to human physiology in selected organ systems.
3. Identify selected anatomical structures within the human body in selected organ systems.
4. Explain selected physiological functions in selected organ systems.
5. Explain the principle of homeostasis as it relates to selected human physiological processes.
6. Explain how feedback loops are used to control selected human physiological systems.
7. Explain selected anatomical and physiological interrelationships in selected organ systems.
8. Demonstrate or explain laboratory procedures used to evaluate selected physiological functions within selected organ systems.
9. Explain selected basic chemical processes occurring at the cellular level.
10. Describe selected processes of human cellular metabolism.
11. Create graphs depicting selected anatomical or physiological data.
12. Interpret graphs depicting selected anatomical or physiological data.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 145 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

4 Credits

A continuation of BIO 144 and the comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic and immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, reproductive system, and fluid, electrolyte and acid/base balance. Laboratory study includes microscope work, substantial organ and animal dissection, and experiments designed to illustrate normal function and physiologic responses to specific stresses. Designed for students in Nursing, Radiologic Technology and other health-related programs.Three class hours, three laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite: BIO 144

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Use appropriate terminology related to human anatomy in selected organ systems.
2. Use appropriate terminology related to human physiology in selected organ systems.
3. Identify selected anatomical structures within the human body in selected organ systems.
4. Explain selected physiological functions in selected organ systems.
5. Explain the principle of homeostasis as it relates to selected human physiological processes.
6. Explain how feedback loops are used to control selected human physiological systems.
7. Explain selected anatomical and physiological interrelationships in selected organ systems.
8. Demonstrate or explain laboratory procedures used to evaluate selected physiological functions in selected organ systems.
9. Explain selected physiological processes used to regulate fluid balance in the body.
10. Explain selected physiological processes used to regulate pH in the body.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 148 - Fundamentals of Biology and Inheritance

3 Credits

Principles of biology with an emphasis on cellular structure and function, genetics and population genetics. Topics will include cellular metabolism, molecular genetics, gene expression, Mendelian genetics and population genetics. This course is an introductory biology course for science-interested students. This course may also fulfill a natural science elective for programs that do not require a laboratory science. Three class hours. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequitie(s): High school biology with a grade of C or better, or BIO 120 with a grade of C or better, and high school chemistry with a grade of C or better, or any college chemistry course with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe the scientific process.
2. Compare and contrast different organic macromolecules.
3. Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
4. Explain the various mechanisms of molecular transport across the plasma membrane.
5. Summarize common metabolic processes such as cellular respiration or fermentation.
6. Summarize the events of the cell cycle.
7. Describe the sources of genetic variation in sexually-reproducing organisms.
8. Explain Mendel’s laws of segregation and independent assortment.
9. Distinguish various mechanisms of genetic inheritance such as complete dominance, codominance, multiple alleles, or sex linkage.
10. Describe DNA replication.
11. Explain the processes involved in gene expression.
12. Explain the general principles of population genetics.

Course Offered Spring only

BIO 150 - Introduction to Biological Evolution

3 Credits

Introduction to the basic principles and concepts of the theory of evolution. Topics will include natural selection and other forces driving evolution, speciation, evolutionary genetics, hominid evolution, and major lines of evidence supporting the theory of evolution. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain basic Mendelian genetics and the role of genetics in the evolutionary process.
2. Identify key people involved in the development of evolutionary theory, evaluate their impacts on the theory, and discuss the history of the theory of evolution.
3. Outline and summarize major components of the theory of evolution including natural selection, sexual selection, mutation, speciation, coevolution, extinction, and hominid evolution.
4. Critically evaluate the evidence supporting the theory of evolution and criticisms to the theory
5. Read and critically evaluate evolutionary studies
6. Analyze the biological and medical significance of the theory of evolution.
7. Discuss the role of evolution in biodiversity and the changes in biodiversity across time.

Course Offered Spring only

BIO 155 - General Biology I

4 Credits

Principles of biology with an emphasis on cellular structure and function, and organic evolution. Topics will include cellular metabolism, molecular genetics, gene expression, Mendelian genetics, natural selection and speciation. The laboratory features activities and experiments that reinforce the concepts presented in lecture. This course is the first in a two-semester sequence in introductory biology for science majors or science-interested students. This course may also fulfill a natural science elective for science-interested students. Two class hours, one conference hour, three laboratory hours. WR (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite: High school biology with a grade of B or better, or BIO 120 with a grade of C or better, and high school chemistry with a grade of C or better, or any college chemistry course with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Formulate a hypothesis and identify the variables in a scientific experiment.
2. Concisely write experimental methods and results in correct scientific journal format.
3. Compare and contrast the structure and function of different organic macromolecules.
4. Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
5. Explain the various mechanisms of molecular transport across the plasma membrane.
6. Summarize common metabolic processes such as cellular respiration, fermentation, or photosynthesis.
7. Summarize the events of the cell cycle.
8. Describe the sources of genetic variation in sexually-reproducing organisms.
9. Explain Mendel’s laws of segregation and independent assortment.
10. Distinguish various mechanisms of genetic inheritance such as complete dominance, codominance, multiple alleles, or sex linkage.
11. Describe the structure and replication of DNA.
12. Explain the processes involved in gene expression.
13. Discuss the role of natural selection in the evolutionary process.
14. Explain the mechanisms involved in speciation.
15. Demonstrate the correct way to use biological laboratory equipment (which may include a compound microscope, a spectrophotometer, or a micropipettor).

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 156 - General Biology II

4 Credits

Principles of biology with an emphasis on the diversity of life, the structure and function of plants and animals, and general ecological principles. The laboratory features activities and experiments that reinforce the concepts presented in lecture. This course is the second in a two-semester sequence in introductory biology for science majors or science-interested students. This course may also fulfill a natural science elective for science-interested students. Two class hours, one conference hour, three laboratory hours. WR (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite: BIO 155 with a grade of C- or higher.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. List the general characteristics of the domains and kingdoms of living organisms. List differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.
2. Describe the hierarchical system for classification of organisms, the species concept, and be able to apply the basic rules of Phylogenetic Systematics (cladistics) to show evolutionary relationships among taxa.
3. Compare the characteristics of selected taxonomic groups of: bacteria, fungi, protists, animals and plants with respect to evolutionary relationships, cell and/or tissue types, body plans, modes of reproduction, and life cycles (including development.
4. Describe the evolutionary changes necessary for aquatic organisms to make the transition to life on land.
5. Describe the structure of an energy flow through ecosystems.
6. Provide examples of contemporary environmental issues.
7. Describe the tissues and organs present in plants in terms of both structure and function; explain the mechanisms of growth, and transport of nutrients and water in plants.
8. Define homeostasis and provide examples of homeostatic regulation in plants and animals.
9. Compare the osmoregulatory mechanisms, developmental processes and patterns, and the structure and function of other selected organ systems in animals.
10. Demonstrate written communication competency in the form of laboratory reports, writing assignments, or short answer/essay exam questions.
11. Demonstrate problem-solving skills as they relate to biological topics.
12. Demonstrate competency in the performance of appropriate experimental protocols.
13. Demonstrate competency in the analysis and interpretation of experimental data.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 195 - Field Studies in Biology

Variable Credit

This course is designed for students who wish to study a particular natural habitat or environment in a focused, hands-on, field setting. The majority of course work is completed in the field at a local or distant location depending upon the title and focus of the course for a given semester. Students will conduct field observations, record data, participate in and design field experiments and construct a field notebook detailing all aspects of their field experience. Credit hours are variable depending upon the field experience offered. Additional fees for travel, lodging, food, and other field expenses may apply. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite: One Biology lab course preferred. Permission of instructor required.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe the physical, biological, and chemical factors that help shape the environment studied.
2. Make and record observations of natural biology, geology, chemistry, and atmospheric features of a particular habitat or environment.
3. Develop inferences and explanations for observations made in the field.
4. Demonstrate the proper use of scientific equipment used for the collection of field data.
5. Construct a scientific field notebook that details field observations, organizes field data, records field experiment procedures, and documents inferences and explanations for observed field phenomenon.
6. Execute a field-based scientific experiment.
7. Report the results of a field-based scientific experiment.
8. Identify and describe significant organisms common to the environment studied.
9. Discuss the distribution and the relative abundance of organisms observed in the environment studied.

Course Offered Fall only

BIO 202 - Microbiology

4 Credits

A one term course for health professionals. A brief introduction to principles of general microbiology with major emphasis on control of microorganisms by physical and chemical processes. Medical microbiology including pathogenicity and epidemiology of infectious diseases, and immunology. Three class hours, two laboratory hours.

Prerequisites: BIO 134 or BIO 143 or BIO 145 or BIO 155 or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate knowledge and laboratory skills in microscopy, aseptic technique, control of microbial growth and microbial identification.
2. Describe and demonstrate an understanding of the functions of a prokaryotic cell and its parts
3. Describe and demonstrate an understanding of the prokaryotic metabolic functions, virulence factors and adaptations for survival.
4. Describe and demonstrate an understanding of host mechanisms for fighting microbial infections
5. Describe and demonstrate an understanding of microbial diseases including the symptoms, etiology, transmission and the body systems they affect.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 209 - General Microbiology

4 Credits

A survey of microorganisms: bacteria, viruses, rickettsia, protozoa, algae and fungi. Major emphasis is placed upon bacteria: classification, genetics, ecology, morphology, physiology, physical and chemical control and economic importance. An introduction to applications of microbiology to food and water analysis, industry and medicine, including principles of immunology and transmission of infectious diseases. This course is designed for the Liberal Arts or science-interested student. Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

Prerequisites: BIO 156 as prerequisite or corequisite, and CHE 145 or CHE 151 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor. Students who have completed BIO 156 with a grade below C- are advised to repeat BIO 156 before attempting BIO 209.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe the prokaryotic cell structures and their functions.
2. Describe the dynamics of bacterial growth, some of the factors that influence bacterial growth, and some methods of controlling microbial growth (physical, chemical, and antimicrobial).
3. Describe the metabolic processes that bacteria employ to derive energy (aerobic respiration, anaerobic respiration, fermentation) and those processes that bacteria employ in biosynthesis (photosynthesis, DNA synthesis, transcription, translation).
4. Describe the bacterial sexual processes of transformation, conjugation, and transduction, and explain how these processes promote genetic diversity.
5. Describe the diversity of prokaryotic organisms in terms of their metabolic characteristics and habitats.
6. Describe virus structure and modes of viral replication.
7. Discuss some of the important bacterial, viral, fungal, and protozoan diseases that affect humans with emphasis on: etiologic agents, body systems affected,modes of transmission
8. Describe the human body’s innate immune response and the specific immune response that involves B and T lymphocytes.
9. Discuss the importance of microorganisms to food production, environmental microbiology, and industrial microbiology.
10. Demonstrate knowledge of the following laboratory procedures: brightfield microscopy, various bacterial staining methods, aseptic and pure culture techniques,physical, chemical and antimicrobial control of microorganisms,standard plate counting of microorganisms,isolation of bacterial mutants and bacterial conjugation,quality testing of water, milk, and foods, microbial identification

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 217 - Nutrition

3 Credits

The study of nutrients needed for healthy functioning of human beings and the biochemical functions of these nutrients in the body. The nutrient content of foods and its application to meal planning. Special nutritional needs of infants, pregnant women, nursing mothers and the elderly. The course is designed for students in Nursing, Dental Hygiene, Radiologic Technology, and other Health Related Programs. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: BIO 135 or BIO 143 or BIO 145 or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. List and identify the function(s) of the six classes of nutrients vital to human life and describe the chemical composition of each class.
2. State the current nutrient recommendations for humans throughout the lifespan.
3. Describe the metabolic pathways through which humans create cellular energy.
4. Describe selected synthetic metabolic pathways available to human cells.
5. Indicate how and where the nutrients flux through catabolic and synthetic metabolic pathways.
6. Analyze and appraise current dietary habits through a diet analysis project.
7. Perform calculations relevant to nutrition (i.e., relative and absolute contributions, estimated energy requirements, body mass index, conversions between units of measurement, etc.).
8. Explain how nutrient standards were devised and how/why they are updated.
9. State safe food handling processes.
10. Evaluate current dietary trends within the U.S.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 221 - Principles of Biochemistry

4 Credits

A study of the major chemical constituents of cells including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Structure and function will be emphasized. Enzyme kinetics, regulation of enzyme activity, and metabolic pathways will also be covered. Laboratory activities include isolation of biological molecules from different biological samples using a variety of common biochemistry techniques with subsequent analysis and characterization. Fall semester only. Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

Prerequisites: BIO 156 with a grade of C- or better, and CHE 151 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. List the 4 major classes of biomolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids) and explain their structure and function.
2. Define the concepts of pH and buffers, and describe the application of buffer solutions.
3. Describe the basic principles of enzyme catalysis, and explain enzyme kinetics in terms of the Michaelis-Menten rate equation.
4. Distinguish between competitive and noncompetitive enzyme inhibition.
5. Describe carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, citric acid cycle) and lipid metabolism (primarily fatty acid catabolism/anabolism) in terms of cellular energetics, regulation of enzyme activity, and enzyme/coenzyme involvement.
6. Describe the role of the electron transport chain and Mitchell’s Chemiosmotic Hypothesis in oxidative phosphorylation.
7. Describe the lipid bilayer structure of biomembranes and provide ultrastructural details.
8. Describe amino acid metabolism in terms of deamination reactions, the urea cycle, and the role of the citric acid cycle in both catabolism and anabolism of amino acids.
9. Describe nucleotide metabolism in terms of de novo and salvage pathways for biosynthesis, regulation of biosynthetic pathways, and purine and pyrimidine catabolism.
10. Collect, analyze and interpret experimental data, and summarize the findings in written laboratory reports.

Course Offered Fall only

BIO 225 - Bioanalytical Techniques I

4 Credits

An introduction to the principles and methods of analytical technique as they relate to quantitative measures of determination. Laboratory experiments include instruction in the use of balances and volumetrics, spectrophotometric analysis, and a variety of titrimetric methods. Fall semester only. Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: CHE 151 or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Apply introductory analytical techniques for quantifying chemical concentrations;
2. Discuss the operation of basic laboratory equipment used in the field of analytical chemistry (i.e. pH meter, analytical balance, spectrophotometer, etc.).
3. Apply the concepts of thermodynamics, acid/base chemistry, or electrochemistry to problems relating to quantitative measurements.
4. Distinguish the titration techniques by different chemical reactions, compute the concentration using appropriate units, and analyze the data using basic statistical methods.
5. Describe the principle of operation of the compound microscope and the transmission and scanning electron microscopes, and discuss some methods of use for each using appropriate terminology.
6. Describe the basic components of the various spectrophotometers and discuss some use of each using appropriate terminology; apply the concept of Beer’s Law to quantify the absorption of radiant energy.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BIO 226 - Bioanalytical Techniques II

4 Credits

An in-depth study of the theory and practice of separation techniques that would be employed in the isolation and purification of biomolecules such as proteins, enzymes, and nucleic acids. Laboratory experiments involve immunology, chromatography, electrophoresis, and blotting techniques (western and southern blots). Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: BIO 156 with a grade of C- or better or BIO 225, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Distinguish the major biological molecules; differentiate the staining and labeling techniques for the detection and identification of biological molecules; describe the methods for concentrating the molecules, comparing the usefulness and efficiency of each.
2. Describe the basic principle of gel electrophoresis; distinguish the different forms of electrophoresis and their applications to biotechnology; analyze and/or interpret data from various forms of electrophoresis.
3. Compare the common blotting and sequencing techniques and demonstrate how these techniques have furthered biotechnology and forensic science.
4. Distinguish monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, comparing the production and benefits of each; describe the immunological methods relevant to biotechnology.
5. Describe the general principle of chromatographic separations; distinguish the chromatography techniques used in the separation of biological molecules; compare each of the techniques based on effectiveness; apply these techniques to the separation of a hypothetical protein sample.
6. Compare the various tissue culture methods employed for the growth and analysis of eukaryotic organisms; describe applications of the culture methods for research.
7. Discuss the stages in the industrial microbiology process.
8. Apply centrifugation techniques to the separation of biological samples; comparing the separation of different biological components.

Course Offered Spring only

BIO 227 - Biotechnology Seminar

1 Credit

A discussion based capstone course that will integrate the topics and concepts of the Biotechnology Program. Emphasis will be on applications of biotechnology, current issues, societal/ethical concerns, and laboratory management. One class hour.

Corequisite: BIO 226

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain practices pertinent to laboratory management such as GMP, SOP, documentation, and instrument validation.
2. Evaluate and discuss scientific articles to distinguish between “good” science and “bad” science.
3. Explain and discuss some of the many applications of biotechnology to plants, animals, and humans.
4. Discuss societal and ethical issues associated with biotechnology.
5. Give an oral presentation of a scientific journal article that integrates the information acquired in the Biotechnology Program.

Course Offered Spring only

BIO 230 - Molecular Genetics

4 Credits

A study of the transmission of genetic information with emphasis on the structure and function of nucleic acids. The genetics of prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses will be covered. The molecular basis of replication, repair, recombination, and gene expression will also be examined. Lab experiments introduce a variety of molecular biology techniques such as replica plating, bacterial conjugation and transformation, the isolation and restriction enzyme cleavage of plasmid DNA, and restriction mapping. Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

Prerequisites: BIO 156 with a grade of C- or better and CHE 151 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Diagram and explain the mechanisms of inheritance in classical Mendelian mono- and dihybrid crosses, in incomplete dominance, in codominance, in gene interaction and epistasis, and in sex-linked crosses.
2. Determine linkage and construct simple eukaryotic chromosome maps by doing diploid and haploid mapping.
3. Explain the bacterial sexual processes of transformation, transduction and conjugation, and construct simple bacterial chromosome maps using these processes.
4. Describe the chemistry and structure of nucleic acids, and the structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic chromosomes.
5. Describe the details of DNA replication, transcription, and translation at the molecular level.
6. Describe the regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and also the genetic control of cancer and eukaryotic development.
7. Distinguish between the DNA repair mechanisms of photoreactivation, excision repair, mismatch repair, postreplication repair, and error-prone repair.
8. Apply complementation testing, deletion mapping, and restriction mapping to selected genetic problems.
9. Describe the basic “tools” of genetic engineering (egs. restriction enzymes, vectors, ligase, host cells, etc.), some of the strategies for gene cloning and screening, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the 2 methods for sequencing DNA.
10. Collect, analyze and interpret data from molecular biology experiments, and summarize the findings in written laboratory reports.

Course Offered Spring only

BIO 235 - Pathophysiology

3 Credits

An introductory course for students in health related disciplines designed to facilitate further learning in their areas of specialization and promote effective interactions as members of the health care team. The course provides an overview of human diseases, their frequency, significance, diagnosis and treatment. The course moves from basic pathological processes to diseases by organs or organ systems to multiple system diseases and associated processes. Three class hours.

Prerequisites: BIO 135, or BIO 143, or BIO 145 or permission of instructor

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Define basic terminology of pathology and discuss types of tests and procedures used to diagnose disease.
2. Discuss the basic categories of disease by general mechanism (e.g. genetic/ developmental, inflammatory/degenerative, hyperplastic/neoplastic) and specific cause (e.g. ischemic, infectious, immune, metabolic, trauma, idiopathic).
3. Describe various processes of altered cellular growth including hypertrophy, hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia and neoplasia.
4. Discuss the similarities and differences between the biological behaviors of benign versus malignant neoplasms.
5. Discuss the basic functions of the wound healing, tissue repair, the immune system and describe specific types of immune system diseases.
6. Discuss the causative agents and general mechanisms of infectious disease.
7. Distinguish between chromosomal abnormalities, single gene abnormalities and multifactorial inheritance as causes of disease.
8. Apply the following to selected organs or organ systems (heart, blood vessels, upper respiratory system, lung, gastrointestinal tract, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, urinary system, male and female reproductive systems, breast, nervous system, musculoskeletal system);.(a) Name and list signs and symptoms of the most frequent and significant diseases of each organ or organ system; (b) Provide an example of each of the following categories of disease (if applicable): genetic/developmental, inflammatory/degenerative (including infectious), and hyperplastic/neoplastic (including cancer); (c) Describe the following aspects of the most frequent or significant diseases: incidence or prevalence, cause, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis.

Course Offered Fall only

BIO 242 - Human Dissection

1 Credit

For students in programs leading to a degree in an allied health field. Careful dissection of the human body by students under faculty supervision will be used to reinforce and enrich the student's study of anatomy. Students gain experience in making educated decisions concerning the dissection, as well as in dissection technique and identification of human anatomical structures. Three laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: BIO 142 and permission of the instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate proper, effective and non-destructive dissection technique.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of human anatomy by being able to identify anatomical structures on a dissected cadaver after completing pre-lab assignments at home.
3. Discuss the importance and structure of organs as they are being dissected.
4. Identify the structures and organs of a human cadaver while providing a "tour" of the specimen.

Course Offered Spring only

BIO 252 - Topics in Biology Seminar

1 Credit

A discussion based seminar course that will integrate and apply biological concepts. Emphasis will be on discussing current scientific issues, library/internet instruction and research, student presentations, and developing technology and teamwork skills. One class hour.

Prerequisite: BIO 156 with a grade of C- or better and one 200 level Biology course with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Read and summarize articles on selected scientific topics.
2. Discuss issues associated with selected scientific topics.
3. Prepare and give an oral presentation on a selected scientific topic.
4. Develop library/internet research skills.
5. Explain some of the applications of scientific databases.
6. Demonstrate proper documentation of sources.
7. Demonstrate the use of current presentation software.
8. Develop teamwork skills by planning a group presentation.

Course Offered Spring only

BIO 260 - General Ecology

4 Credits

An introduction to the interactions between living organisms and their physical, chemical and biological environment. Several levels of ecological organization are examined. These include the study of different types of populations, communities and ecosystems. Topics include population structure and growth, species interaction, energy flow, nutrient cycling, succession, and applications to current environmental management issues. Students perform ecological experiments in the field as well as in the laboratory. Two class hours, one conference hour, three laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: BIO 155 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe major habitats found on land and in water and explain adaptations of organisms to the variation in abiotic factors found in major habitat types.
2. Explain the use of distribution patterns, life tables, age structures, survivorship curves and population growth curves in describing the structure of populations.
3. Describe factors that affect the outcome of competitive interactions between individuals of different species and outline other types of interactions that may occur between organisms.
4. Describe the relationships between predator and prey populations and outline the structure of food webs and trophic interactions in a community.
5. Trace the flow of energy through an ecosystem and describe some major biogeochemical cycles associated with ecosystem function.
6. Discuss some of the current applied ecological issues including the effects of habitat fragmentation and loss, invasive species, and pollution.

Course Offered Fall only

BIO 265 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

4 Credits

A study of vertebrate structure, function and evolution. Relationships between the structural and functional adaptations of the different vertebrate groups and their environment are examined. The laboratory features dissections and experiments that illustrate these adaptations in both aquatic and terrestrial vertebrates. Two class hours, one conference hour, three laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: BIO 156 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of vertebrates and what makes both chordates and vertebrates unique among animals.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the evolutionary history of vertebrates and the evolutionary relationships among different groups of vertebrates.
3. Compare and contrast the many physiological, ecological, and behavioral adaptations of the different groups of vertebrates
4. Compare and contrast the external anatomy, skeletal features, and internal organ systems of the different groups of vertebrates.
5. Observe and discuss field and laboratory techniques used in the study of vertebrates.

Course Offered Spring only

BIO 290 - Independent Study

Variable Credit

See the Department Chairperson for more information on Independent Study courses.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BUS - Business
CDL - Interdisciplinary
CE - Cooperative Education-Disney World
CE - Hospitality
CE - Office Technology
CEL - Leadership
CHE - Chemistry
CHI - Chinese/Foreign Language
CIN - Cinema Studies
CIS - Computer Information Systems
CIT - Civil and Construction Technology
CLT - Clinical Laboratory Technician
COM - Communication
COS - College Success
CPT - Computer Technology
CRC - Computer Related Curricula
CRJ - Criminal Justice
CSC - Computer Science
DAS - Dental Assisting
DEN - Dental Hygiene
EBL - Experience Based Learning
ECE - Education and Early Care
ECO - Economics
EDU - Education
ELT - Electrical Engineering Technology/Electronics
EMS - Emergency Medical Services
ENG - English Literature
ENG - English Writing
ENR - Engineering Science
ESL - English For Speakers Of Other Languages (ESOL)
FPT - Fire Protection Technology
FRE - French/Foreign Language
FSA - Food Service Administration
GEG - Geography
GEO - Geology
GER - German/Foreign Language
GLF - Golf Management
HBR - Hebrew/Foreign Language
HED - Health Education
HEG - Health Education Global
HIM - Health Information Technology
HIS - History
HMN - Humanities
HON - Honors Studies
HPR - Health Professions
HSM - Homeland Security Administration
HSP - Hospitality
HTL - Hotel Technology
HUM - Human Services
HVA - Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning
IDE - Interior Design
ITA - Italian/Foreign Language
JPN - Japanese/Foreign Language
LAW - Law
LDS - Leadership
MAR - Marketing
MET - Mechanical Technology
MFG - Manufacturing Technology: Automation / Robotics
MTH - Mathematics
MUS - Music
NUR - Nursing
OFT - Office Technology
OPT - Optical Systems Technology
PE - Physical Education--Coed
PEC - Physical Education--Coed
PEJ - Physical Education-Criminal Justice
PEM - Physical Education--Men
PEW - Physical Education-Women
PHL - Philosophy
PHO - Photography
PHY - Physics
PLE - Police: Law Enforcement
PLS - Paralegal Studies
POR - Portuguese/Foreign Language
POS - Political Science
PPE - Physical Studies/Physical Education
PSC - Public Safety Communications
PSC - Public Safety Training
PST - Public Safety Training
PSY - Psychology
REA - Reading
SBS - Honors Studies
SBS - Social & Behavioral Sciences
SCI - Science
SCR - Computer Security
SGT - Surgical Technology
SMT - Sports Management
SOC - Sociology
SPA - Spanish/Foreign Language
SPC - Speech Communication
STT - Solar Thermal Technology
SUS - Sustainability Studies
SVL - Service Learning
TAM - Tooling and Machining
TEK - Technology
THE - Theatre
TOY - Toyota
TRS - Transitional Studies
TVL - Travel And Tourism
XRT - Radiologic Technology