Course Descriptions

The following is a complete listing of courses offered at MCC. You can also visit our Programs of Study page for a list of course requirements necessary to complete your degree.

AAD - Applied Art and Design
ACC - Accounting
ACD - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency
AGS - Agricultural Studies
ANT - Anthropology
ARA - Arabic/Foreign Language
ART - Art
ASL - American Sign Language/Foreign Language
ATP - Automotive Technology
BIO - Biology
BUS - Business
BUS 104 - Introduction to Business

3 Credits

An introductory study of business including organizational forms, the function of production, finance, marketing and human resources. Additional topics will be environmental factors which impact business such as government business ethics and current business issues. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify the challenges that businesses face in today’s global environment.
2. Explain why ethical behavior and social responsibility are important to businesses.
3. Contrast the advantages and disadvantages of the various forms of business organization.
4. Explain the importance of entrepreneurship to the US economy.
5. Describe characteristics of successful entrepreneurs.
6. Explain the four basic management functions including how managers motivate employees.
7. Identify key tasks involved in designing a production process.
8. Explain how the marketing mix of product, price, place and promotion are used to create successful businesses.
9. Discuss how internal and external users of financial information analyze financial statements.
10. Discuss key economic concepts such as scarcity, supply or demand.
11. Explain the role of human resource management in modern organizational settings.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BUS 110 - Entrepreneurial Studies I

3 Credits

First of two small business courses designed for those interested in learning how to start and manage a small business. It begins by defining and explaining the nature of small business in today's economy and entrepreneurs in the context of the free enterprise system. The topics include small business opportunities, legal forms of ownership, franchising, starting a new venture, sources of financing, developing marketing strategies and human resource management. Students will also learn the key components of a business plan, review case studies, and undertake a major project. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Assess students’ skills, interests, risk averseness and abilities to identify their entrepreneurial potential and career opportunities.
2. Identify the critical factors that are used to identify business start-up ideas.
3. Analyze the best start-up method that fits the student’s entrepreneurial objectives, financial resources and skills.
4. Choose the best form of legal organization to decrease risk, manage tax liabilities, decrease costs and start-up time, and increase long-term profitability.
5. Analyze the business planning process to increase chances for business success, to seek out financing sources, and develop a “blue print” for the business.
6. Develop a marketing plan for a small business.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BUS 135 - Supervising for the 21st Century

3 Credits

This course is designed to teach supervisors the concepts and skills they need to manage work and lead people in a diverse workforce. Its emphasis is on planning, problem-solving, communication, decision making, and employee motivation skills through the practical application of these concepts. It includes practice in hiring, training, performance appraisal, meetings, time management, and compliance with government regulations for equal opportunity, safety, and health. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Use effective communication skills to resolve common workplace issues from a supervisory perspective.
2. Use the scientific method to solve problems and make decisions common to first line supervisors.
3. Explain how motivation theories are used to accomplish organization goals through supervisory tasks, which may include task delegation, performance appraisal, counseling or discipline.
4. Apply the principles of quality and customer focus to the responsibilities of first line supervisors
5. Explain the challenges of effectively supervising an ethnically and culturally diverse workforce.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BUS 200 - Legal Environment of Business

3 Credits

This course is a study of laws relevant to the non-lawyer business professional. It includes such basic legal topics as court systems, stages of a lawsuit, torts, real property and contracts, as well as such business-specific topics as intellectual property, consumer law, criminal law of businesses, antitrust law, environmental law, and regulations adopted by government agencies. This course is required for A.A.S. students in Entrepreneurial and Applied Business Studies and A.A.S. students in Accounting: General. This course is not recommended as a Business Elective for students enrolled in A.S. programs in Business Administration or International Business. NOTE: Bus 201, Business Law I, is the required law course for students enrolled in A.S. programs in Business Administration or International Business. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Define the process of pursuing a lawsuit from beginning to end.
2. Compare and contrast the alternative methods of resolving disputes including mediation, arbitration and summary jury trial.
3. Analyze what conduct will subject their business to liability based on tort laws, including negligence; infringement of trademark, copyright or patent; interference with contractual relations; disclosure of trade secrets; and more.
4. Apply their lessons to create a valid contract, and predict the consequences for breaching it.
5. List forms of ownership of real property; describe methods of transferring real property; recall special laws particular to condominiums; cite what eminent domain laws require; categorize the special obligations of landlords and tenants; predict and question the circumstances when the government can take property using eminent domain; discuss zoning laws; define trespass and nuisance.
6. Point out rights of employees and how those rights impact work environments.
7. Explain how government agencies operate, both in creating regulations and in enforcement responsibilities; describe mandates of environmental laws and enforcement mechanisms.
8. Report the purpose of the antitrust laws and their content; describe international laws relevant to transactions between companies from two different countries.
9. Synthesize various consumer laws that impact rights of manufacturers, retailers and consumers.
10. Define what constitutes a crime and the accompanying penalties.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BUS 201 - Business Law I

3 Credits

A study of legal principles applied to business transactions. Topics covered include: contracts, criminal law and business, business torts, court systems, and commercial paper. This course is required for A.S. students in Business Administration and A.S. students in International Business. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Define and describe the legal principles applied to business transactions covered in the course including contracts, criminal law and business, torts, court systems, and commercial paper.
2. Apply the legal principles to practical business situations.
3. Describe how to foresee and avoid legal difficulties in the business world and in personal dealings.
4. Recognize when individuals may handle legal situations on their own and when they should seek the advice and guidance of an attorney.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BUS 202 - Business Law II

3 Credits

A continuation of BUS 201 of the study of legal principles applied to business transactions. Topics covered include: corporations, limited liability companies, partnerships, agency, franchises, bankruptcy, real property, personal property, sales, and secured transactions. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Define and describe the legal principles applied to business transactions covered in the course including corporations, limited liability companies, partnerships, agency, franchises, bankruptcy, real property, personal property, sales, and secured transactions.
2. Apply the legal principles to practical business situations.
3. Describe how to foresee and avoid legal difficulties in the business world and in personal dealings.
4. Recognize when individuals may handle legal situations on their own and when they should seek the advice and guidance of an attorney.

Course Offered Spring only

BUS 204 - Management: Theory and Practice

3 Credits

A study of the theories and practices that are used in the organization and management of profit and non-profit business and institutions. Topics will include planning, decision making, organizing, staffing, leading and controlling. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: BUS 104 with a grade of C or higher

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Apply traditional management theories to current management case problems.
2. Apply course content about interpersonal skills such as conflict resolution, employee motivation, and team building by working in groups to research and prepare projects, presentations, and other assigned group
activities
3. Analyze information in text cases and examples to compare performance of management functions in organizations to one another and to ideal theoretical models.
4. Evaluate information about companies and organizations to assess their current and future situations using such management tools as SWOT Analysis, Porter’s Strategies Model, Philosophies of Ethical and Social Responsibility, Cost:Benefit Analysis, and Portfolio Analysis.
5. Use the scientific problem solving process to create alternative solutions and new approaches to case problems by using course presented concepts and theories.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BUS 207 - Human Resources Management

3 Credits

An introduction to the principles, practices, and techniques used in the development and implementation of an effective Human Resources/Personnel Management program. The course includes a discussion of employment, training, compensation, labor relations, health and safety and federal laws governing human resource management. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe the field of human resource management and its relevance to managers and employees in work organizations.
2. Analyze case studies to determine how laws regulate human resources functions which may include recruiting, hiring, pay, evaluation and promotion.
3. Develop a job description and specification using a job analysis that follows acceptable design principles.
4. Analyze a job for motivational characteristics.
5. Develop a training plan which could include needs assessment, objectives, training methods, or evaluation systems.
6. Describe the methods used in performance management which could include counseling, discipline or performance evaluation.
7. Identify components of compensation systems and describe how they can be used to motivate employees.
8. Describe how labor relations affect organizations.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BUS 208 - Organizational Behavior

3 Credits

Organizational behavior provides a conceptual and experiential basis for motivating and coordinating people to manage change in organizations. This course is intended for those who want to develop the tools for understanding, analyzing and changing the work behaviors of individuals and groups in an increasingly diverse workforce. It will use a combination of exercises, self-assessment techniques, cases and role plays to develop insights that facilitate self-knowledge and teamwork in a dynamic global environment. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: BUS 104 with a C or higher

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe specific theories related to perception, learning, motivation, leadership, job design, and organizational change.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of ethics and social responsibility in organizational behavior.
3. Describe and evaluate methods of motivating and rewarding individuals and groups within a business organization.
4. Identify appropriate decision making tools and models and apply them to organizational situations.
5. Integrate individual, group, and organizational level concepts to workplace related behavior, values and attitudes.
6. Perform a literature review on topics related to organizational behavior, summarize articles and identify their important points.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BUS 210 - Entrepreneurial Studies II

3 Credits

Second of two courses designed for those interested in learning how to start and manage a small business. It builds on the preceding course concerning the establishment of the small business and deals with management of the on-going venture. This course takes a functional approach to managing the small business through a discussion of more advanced topics including entrepreneurial characteristics, financial planning and control, business operations, risk management, regulations, business valuation and succession issues, and other current topics. Students will develop a business plan. Three class hours. Course offered during the Spring only during the evening.

Prerequisite: BUS 110 with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Utilize effective purchasing procedures, inventory control systems and quality control procedures to improve business operations.
2. Create and use performance standards to analyze business operations.
3. Analyze the financial structure of a business and use the tools of tax planning to develop a profitability plan for a business.
4. Analyze the risk position of a business and utilize the various risk management tools to decrease its risk exposure and liability.
5. Develop a business plan for a business venture.

BUS 220 - Applied Business Applications

3 Credits

A case study approach to the use of office productivity software to solve business problems and manage business processes. Emphasis will be on the use of spreadsheet and database applications to analyze data. Word processing and presentation software will be used to document and present solutions. Several major projects will be assigned to be completed outside of class. Each student will create a semester-long portfolio of related work. Basic knowledge of the PC, keyboard, and mouse are required. This course requires the use of the Microsoft Windows version of Office, including Microsoft Access, which is not available for the Macintosh version of Office. Two class hours, two lab hours. 3 Credits.

Prerequisite: BUS 104 with a grade of C or higher

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Manage data (add, delete, update records) in an existing relational database using the tables, queries, forms, and reports objects provided in a database management system.
2.Apply business functions using a spreadsheet application for the purpose of business performance analysis.
3.Apply word processing, spreadsheet, and database software to develop a business proposal based on a business case study.
4.Create a presentation of the business proposal developed by the student.
5.Describe the major hardware and software components of a computer system.
6.Describe how data is represented and stored in a computer system.
7.Describe the major hardware and software components of a computer network, including internet technologies.
8.Utilize effective file organization and management skills.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

BUS 250 - International Management and Marketing

3 Credits

This seminar has been designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop knowledge and understanding of the processes, procedures and challenges that arise in conducting business across national borders. Representatives from business or government involved in international trade will be invited to present information and conduct a discussion in various areas of international business expertise. This course is intended for students who are in the last semester of the degree program. Three class hours.

Prerequisites: BUS 104, MAR 200, ECO 111, ECO 112, ACC 101, ENG 101, Three credits of foreign language, SOC 150 and GEG 211 or permission of instructor. SOC 150 and GEG 211 can be taken concurrently. Students in business programs other than International Business are not required to have the foreign language, SOC 150 and GEG 211 prerequisites for this course. Please contact the course instructor or department chair before registering for the course to discuss course expectations..

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Discuss how the management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling are utilized in a global business enterprise.
2. Describe the issues and skills necessary to manage a successful multicultural workforce and market in a global economy.
3. Analyze how the global trade and investment environment can affect the success and profitability of a company’s global strategy.
4. Choose the most effective market entry strategy to pursue global business opportunities.

Course Offered Spring only

BUS 275 - Business Cooperative Education

4 Credits

This cooperative education course is limited to students enrolled in Business and Computer Information Systems AAS degree programs. Students who work or desire to work either full time or part time at jobs related to their college major (AAS Accounting, AAS Computer Information Systems, AAS Entrepreneurial Studies) are eligible for this course. Students take a career-related classroom seminar for two hours each week while working a minimum of 180 hours during the semester at a job in the area of their degree program. Successful completion of the seminar and a minimum of 180 hours of work experience in any one semester entitle a student to receive four credit hours. This will be one of the last business courses that a student will take. The classroom seminar and work experience will provide a practical application of the student's academic experiences and tie the skills and competencies that the student has learned to a work experience. This course will assess the student's understanding and command of academic learning in the degree program and gauge how well the student is prepared for the work force in their specific field. Two class hours each week, 180 hours of work experience during the semester. Course offered Fall and Spring as a Hybrid.

Prerequisite for AC01: 30 credits or more with a cumulative 2.0 GPA and the following courses: ACC 101, BUS 104 with a grade of C or higher, CRC 125 or BUS 220, ECO 101 (or ECO 111), ENG 101 and review and approval of co-op job placement by the Career Services Office. Prerequisite for CI01: 30 credits or more with a cumulative 2.0 GPA and the following courses: ACC 101, BUS 104 with a grade of C or higher, BUS 220, CIS 101(or CSC101), CIS 110, ENG 101 and review and approval of co-op job placement by the Career Services Office. Prerequisite for EP01: 30 credits or more with a cumulative 2.0 GPA and the following courses: ACC 130 (OR ACC 101), BUS 104 with a grade of C or higher, BUS 220, ECO 101 (or ECO 111), ENG 101, MAR 200, and review and approval of co-op job placement by the Career Services Office.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Apply basic standards of professional behavior in the workplace.
2. Develop co-op learning outcomes with a supervisor.
3. Demonstrate proficiency in co-op learning outcomes.
4. Assess personal inventories in areas which may include time management, values, personality, interpersonal communication, conflict resolution, job satisfaction, needs, or leadership style.

BUS 290 - Independent Study

Variable Credit

See the Department Chairperson.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CDL - Interdisciplinary
CE - Cooperative Education-Disney World
CE - Hospitality
CE - Office Technology
CEL - Leadership
CHE - Chemistry
CHI - Chinese/Foreign Language
CIN - Cinema Studies
CIS - Computer Information Systems
CIT - Civil and Construction Technology
CLT - Clinical Laboratory Technician
COM - Communication
COS - College Success
CPT - Computer Technology
CRC - Computer Related Curricula
CRJ - Criminal Justice
CSC - Computer Science
DAS - Dental Assisting
DEN - Dental Hygiene
EBL - Experience Based Learning
ECE - Education and Early Care
ECO - Economics
EDU - Education
ELT - Electrical Engineering Technology/Electronics
EMS - Emergency Medical Services
ENG - English Literature
ENG - English Writing
ENR - Engineering Science
ESL - English For Speakers Of Other Languages (ESOL)
FPT - Fire Protection Technology
FRE - French/Foreign Language
FSA - Food Service Administration
GEG - Geography
GEO - Geology
GER - German/Foreign Language
GLF - Golf Management
HBR - Hebrew/Foreign Language
HED - Health Education
HEG - Health Education Global
HIM - Health Information Technology
HIS - History
HMN - Humanities
HON - Honors Studies
HPR - Health Professions
HSM - Homeland Security Administration
HSP - Hospitality
HTL - Hotel Technology
HUM - Human Services
HVA - Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning
IDE - Interior Design
ITA - Italian/Foreign Language
JPN - Japanese/Foreign Language
LAW - Law
LDS - Leadership
MAR - Marketing
MET - Mechanical Technology
MFG - Manufacturing Technology: Automation / Robotics
MTH - Mathematics
MUS - Music
NUR - Nursing
OFT - Office Technology
OPT - Optical Systems Technology
PE - Physical Education--Coed
PEC - Physical Education--Coed
PEJ - Physical Education-Criminal Justice
PEM - Physical Education--Men
PEW - Physical Education-Women
PHL - Philosophy
PHO - Photography
PHY - Physics
PLE - Police: Law Enforcement
PLS - Paralegal Studies
POR - Portuguese/Foreign Language
POS - Political Science
PPE - Physical Studies/Physical Education
PSC - Public Safety Communications
PSC - Public Safety Training
PST - Public Safety Training
PSY - Psychology
REA - Reading
SBS - Honors Studies
SBS - Social & Behavioral Sciences
SCI - Science
SCR - Computer Security
SGT - Surgical Technology
SMT - Sports Management
SOC - Sociology
SPA - Spanish/Foreign Language
SPC - Speech Communication
STT - Solar Thermal Technology
SUS - Sustainability Studies
SVL - Service Learning
TAM - Tooling and Machining
TEK - Technology
THE - Theatre
TOY - Toyota
TRS - Transitional Studies
TVL - Travel And Tourism
XRT - Radiologic Technology