Course Descriptions

The following is a complete listing of courses offered at MCC. You can also visit our Programs of Study page for a list of course requirements necessary to complete your degree.

AAD - Applied Art and Design
ACC - Accounting
ACD - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency
AGS - Agricultural Studies
ANT - Anthropology
ARA - Arabic/Foreign Language
ART - Art
ASL - American Sign Language/Foreign Language
ATP - Automotive Technology
BIO - Biology
BUS - Business
CDL - Interdisciplinary
CE - Cooperative Education-Disney World
CE - Hospitality
CE - Office Technology
CEL - Leadership
CHE - Chemistry
CHI - Chinese/Foreign Language
CIN - Cinema Studies
CIS - Computer Information Systems
CIT - Civil and Construction Technology
CLT - Clinical Laboratory Technician
COM - Communication
COS - College Success
CPT - Computer Technology
CRC - Computer Related Curricula
CRJ - Criminal Justice
CRJ 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 Credits

Examines all three segments of criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts, and corrections, including study of their evolution, structure, agencies, career opportunities and requirements, responsibilities, and ethics. Role of Constitution and state and federal laws, current problems of each. Three class hours.

Prerequisite(s): College English placement and Accuplacer reading score above 70 or College English placement and Accuplacer reading score below 70 and REA 100 or TRS 200 or TRS 105 and REA 100 if Accuplacer reading score is not above 70. Co-requisite(s): TRS 200 or TRS 105 and REA 100 if Accuplacer reading score is not above 70.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Evaluate his/her attitudes and attributes in relation to criminal justice careers and choose an appropriate curricular emphasis.
2. Illustrate and describe the process of a criminal prosecution from occurrence of alleged offense to discharge.
3. Identify the major components of the criminal justice system and explain their interrelationships.
4. Identify and explain the “sources of law” and their interrelationships.
5. Identify various theories of crime causation and describe their effects on the criminal justice system.
6. Differentiate key terms and concepts in the criminal justice system.
7. Identify ethical issues that are present throughout the criminal justice system and describe acceptable responses to them.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 102 - Introduction to Private Security/Loss Prevention

3 Credits

This course will cover the development, role, responsibility, limitations and liabilities of the private security industry within society from its beginnings to its current state. Specific attention will be spent on describing the relationship between private security professionals, law enforcement and representatives of the legal system. Additional topics such as work place violence, organized retail theft, the conduct of internal and external investigations, interviewing techniques, current role and impact technology, and career opportunities will also be analyzed and evaluated. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain the evolving impact of technological advances within various contexts, which could include the social, business, or private security spheres.
2. Compare the responsibilities of a private security professional with those of a law enforcement officer.
3. Explain how the work of private security professionals is compatible with the American criminal and civil legal system.
4. Analyze how private security teams, in partnership with law enforcement officials, address various issues related to organized retail
5. Explain how private security professionals can address the rise of violence in the workplace.
6. Explain how private security professionals deal with white collar crime.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 103 - Constitutional Law and Rights of People

3 Credits

A study of the Federal Constitution and the Bill of Rights with regard to the rights of the individual, as interpreted by leading U.S. Supreme Court decisions. The first, fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth, and fourteenth amendments will be primarily focused upon with an emphasis on their law enforcement impact. Three class hours.

Prerequisite(s): College English placement and Accuplacer reading score above 70 or College English placement and Accuplacer reading score below 70 and REA 100 or TRS 200 or TRS 105 and REA 100 if Accuplacer reading score is not above 70. Co-requisite(s): TRS 200 or TRS 105 and REA 100 if Accuplacer reading score is not above 70.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify and describe legal principles included in the Articles and Amendments of the United States Constitution.
2. Discuss the purpose and methods of continuously updating knowledge of changes in constitutional law.
3. Compare and contrast New York State specific constitutional rules and rights with federal rules.
4. Apply core areas of the law to law enforcement applications critical to law enforcement operations.
5. Illustrate and explain the appellate court process.
6. Utilize proper legal terminology.
7. Analyze cases using the case law method.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 104 - Criminal Law

3 Credits

A study of the fundamental concepts of the substantive criminal law, including a short history of and purposes of the law, classification of offenses and sentences. A detailed study of mental culpability, defenses, such as infancy, insanity and the anticipatory crimes, offenses against the person; and those involving intrusion upon property, fraud, public administration, and public order. Three class hours. (Need not be taken in sequence.)

Prerequisites: CRJ 101, CRJ 103 or permission of instructor

Course Learning Outcomes
1. State the basic principles of criminal law and explain how those principles are reflected in New York’s Penal Law.
2. Identify the major categories of New York‘s Penal Law offenses.
3. Explain the basic elements and aggravating circumstances of each category of offense in New York's Penal law.
4. Apply with proficiency the New York State Penal Law statutes to hypothetical problems or other fact patterns.
5. Explain how statutory law is impacted by constitutional law or case law with specific examples in the New York State Penal Law.
6. Discuss the purpose and methods of continuously updating changes in statutory law and relevant case law.
7. Demonstrate proficiency in using the New York State Penal Law as a reference tool.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 105 - Criminal Procedure Law

3 Credits

A study of the fundamental concepts of the procedural criminal law including such concepts as double jeopardy, immunity, statute of limitations, the filing of accusatory instruments, arrest without a warrant, the issuance and execution of a warrant of arrest, arraignments, preliminary hearings, bail, trial, grand and petit juries. Three class hours. (Need not be taken in sequence.)

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103. Recommended not to be taken concurrently with CRJ 104.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Outline the chronology of a New York State criminal prosecution from filing of the first accusatory instrument through appeal.
2. Compare and contrast each step of the New York State criminal prosecution process for both felony and misdemeanor offenses.
3. Explain New York’s grand jury system.
4. Describe the role of the grand jury system in the investigation and prosecution of offenses.
5. Apply with proficiency the New York Criminal Procedure Law statutes to hypothetical problems and other fact patterns.
6. Explain how statutory law is impacted by constitutional law and case law with specific examples in the New York Criminal Procedure Law.
7. Discuss the purpose and methods of continuously updating changes in statutory law and the relevant case law.
8. Discuss the relationship between basic federal and state constitutional principles and their statutory corollaries in areas such as arrest, search and seizure, or the trial process.
9. Demonstrate proficiency in using the New York State Criminal Procedure Law as a reference tool.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 121 - Criminal Justice Education Internship I

3 Credits

An activity designed to enhance both the theoretical and educational concepts learned in the practical work experience gained by working 90 hours during a semester in an approved criminal justice agency. This course is also designed to assist you in your career exploration. You are required to find the right agency in which to do your internship. To get the most out of this course you should be working in an agency and in a position that best represents your career goal. Papers and assignments will be completed on the work experiences and their educational value.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of CRJ 101,CRJ 103, CRJ 104 or CRJ 171, and CRJ 204, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Discuss the relationship between Formal Education and Work Experience in career preparation.
2. Analyze interpersonal problems experienced in the workplace.
3. Explain strategies employed by agencies to deal with interpersonal problems in the workplace.
4. Discuss changes in personal attitudes as a result of incidents and experiences in the workplace.
5. Develop a career achievement plan which may include; self-assessment, goal setting or job search strategies.
6. Discuss potential ethical problems associated with employment in a Criminal Justice agency.
7. Explain strategies employed by Criminal Justice agencies to deal with ethical problems.
8. Discuss the purpose and importance of Performance evaluation in the workplace.
9. Discuss the purpose and importance of the Mission Statement in a Criminal Justice agency.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 170 - Introduction to Corrections

3 Credits

This course focuses on the major programs within the corrections component of the criminal justice system. It includes analysis of probation, institutional treatment, parole, and community corrections programs. Development of corrections philosophy, theory, and practice will be presented with emphasis on constitutional rights of offenders. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Discuss the corrections component of the criminal justice system.
2. Describe the conflicting purposes, goals, and objectives of the corrections system.
3. Describe the various correctional philosophies and how they affect the system.
4. Identify the choices available to the correction system, such as incarceration, probation, or community-based corrections.
5. Discuss the basic differences between jail and prison.
6. Discuss the basic differences between probation and parole.
7. Discuss the basic differences between community-based corrections and current correctional practices.
8. Identify ethical issues in the corrections system and describe acceptable responses to them.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 171 - Legal Aspects of Corrections

3 Credits

A review of the Constitution, Bill of Rights, civil rights of institutional inmates and those under supervision; legal authority and responsibilities of institutional, probation and parole officers; procedural law with an explanation of the court systems of the U.S. at all levels, emphasizing adversary proceedings in the criminal and civil courts as they apply to corrections. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Discuss the purpose and methods of continuously updating knowledge of constitutional law affecting prisons and prisoner.
2. Compare and contrast New York State specific constitutional requirements and New York State Minimum Standards with those mandated by federal court decisions.
3. Apply basic knowledge of the federal and state constitutions to critical issues in the area of corrections.
4. Illustrate and explain the appellate court process.
5. Utilize legal terminology with proficiency.
6. Analyze cases using the case law method.

Course Offered Spring only

CRJ 172 - Institutional Procedures and Treatment of Inmates

3 Credits

The function of the correctional officer is examined: attitude, obligations and authority. Institutional procedures in reception, classification, program assignment and release procedures are reviewed. Trends in jail programs, work release programs, half-way houses, narcotic addiction control centers and contract program planning are described and evaluated. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Discuss inmate attitudes and functioning in a jail/prison atmosphere.
2. Explain jail/prison procedures from reception to release from the staff point of view.
3. Explain jail/prison procedures from reception to release from the inmate point of view.
4. Explain current trends regarding inmate procedures and programs.
5. Identify the New York State Minimum Standards and how they apply to the operation of a New York State correctional facility.
6. Describe the various programs available to inmates.
7. Evaluate the purposes and success of programs available to inmates.

Course Offered Spring only

CRJ 201 - Criminal Investigations

3 Credits

A study of the qualities of an investigation, general criminal investigative methods, procedures and techniques, and phases of investigation. Three class hours.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain the role of investigations in the criminal justice process.
2. Identify skills required to successfully investigate crimes.
3. Process physical evidence at a crime scene.
4. Define physical parameters of a crime scene.
5. Document all phases of the criminal investigation process.
6. Identify solvability factors.
7. Prioritize evidence of the crime with an eye towards prosecution.
8. Evaluate elements of a crime with an eye towards prosecution
9. Identify ethical issues that are present throughout the criminal justice system.
10. Describe acceptable responses to ethical issues as they pertain to investigation.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 203 - Private Security/ Loss Prevention Investigations

3 Credits

This course will cover the process of initiating, conducting and completing an investigation within the private security field. Particular attention will focus on the role of technology within private security investigations, analyzing different types of investigations, defining the multiple components of an investigation, describing skills an investigator must possess, explaining the interviewing process of witnesses and suspects, and the obtaining of written statements. Finally, additional topics such as legal liabilities, investigator and business responsibilities, the role of law enforcement, and the future of private investigative services will be discussed. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: CRJ 102

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain the different types of technology which can be used to assist a private security investigation.
2. Assess the necessary steps an investigator must follow to conduct and fully complete a private security investigation.
3. Differentiate between the conduct of a private security investigation and a law enforcement investigation.
4. Summarize the purpose of interviewing witnesses and suspects from a private security perspective.
5. Describe the process of obtaining written statements from witnesses and suspects from a private security perspective.
6. Contrast how the investigative process will vary in different private security investigations.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 204 - Juvenile Justice

3 Credits

Juvenile delinquency and the role of the criminal justice practitioner in handling juvenile matters is examined. The philosophy and history of juvenile proceedings, including trends in prevention, placements, current court decisions and "rights of children" are emphasized. The Family Court Law of New York and handling of juvenile matters are explored. Three class hours.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe his/her attitudes and attributes in relation to juvenile justice careers.
2. Describe the various theories of crime causation.
3. Describe the effects of crime causation on the juvenile justice system.
4. Discuss the major components of the juvenile justice system.
5. Explain the interrelationships of the major components of the juvenile justice system.
6. Define key terms and concepts in the juvenile justice system.
7. Differentiate among key terms and concepts in the juvenile justice system.
8. Compare and contrast key terms in juvenile justice with those in criminal justice.
9. Discuss the problems unique to juveniles in contemporary culture.
10. Discuss the applicable federal and New York State law relevant to juvenile procedures.
11. Illustrate and explain the process of an adjudication from occurrence of the alleged act to disposition.
12. Discuss current trends in juvenile justice, which could include prevention, investigation, treatment, or rehabilitation.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 207 - Criminal Evidence

3 Credits

A study of rules of evidence in criminal matters. Particular emphasis is placed on rules of evidence in the fourth, fifth, and sixth amendments of the Bill of Rights which safeguard such fundamental individual liberties as personal security, protection from self-incrimination, and right to counsel, with emphasis on New York law. Three class hours.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Discuss the purpose of continuously updating knowledge of the rules of evidence.
2. Discuss the methods of continuously updating knowledge of the rules of evidence.
3. Outline chain of custody from discovery at crime scene to admission of evidence at court.
4. Explain the rules of evidence to include privileged communications, exclusionary rule, hearsay, documents, or photographs.
5. Identify the key elements of testifying effectively.
6. Express legal literacy.
7. Compare and contrast New York State specific rules of evidence with federal rules.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 209 - Crime Scene Management

3 Credits

Examines the application of the physical and biological sciences to criminal investigation. Modern technology will be detailed as it applies to crime scene management, fingerprint science and photography. Emphasis is placed on the inter-relationship between science and law enforcement. The student will have the opportunity, in a classroom equipped with laboratory materials, to demonstrate their learning with hands-on activities directly related to the contemporary crime scene. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe the History of Forensic Science.
2. Utilize proper Forensic Science terminology.
3. Apply appropriate Forensic Science principles to Investigations.
4. Explain the “Synergistic Process” involved in Forensic Science investigations.
5. Describe crime scene investigation principles to include; reconstruction, evidence collection, preservation of evidence, photography and documentation.
6. Describe orally all aspects of a Crime Scene Forensic Investigation in preparation for court testimony.
7. Demonstrate methods of collection, processing, analysis, and evaluation of evidence.
8. Identify and discuss ethical issues regarding crime scene management.
9. Develop competence in oral and written documentation relating to crime scene management.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 211 - Community Values and the Administration of Justice

3 Credits

The inter-relationship of community values and ethical conduct in the administration of justice is explored. Through interaction and study, the student will become aware of how community and professional expectations can affect role performance. Open communication and accountability within and without the justice process will be stressed. (It is strongly suggested that students register for this course during their final semester before graduation.) Three class hours.

Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101, CRJ 103, CRJ 104 or CRJ 171, CRJ 121, CRJ 204, or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: CRJ 121

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Discuss contemporary problems in the area of criminal justice.
2. Identify and describe acceptable responses to current ethical problems in criminal justice.
3. Analyze contemporary criminal justice issues utilizing media or other sources of information.
4. Identify and describe issues with regard to partnerships between criminal justice agencies and the community.
5. Apply critical thinking and reasoning techniques to the criminal justice issues.
6. Research contemporary criminal justice issues.
7. Participate in debates on contemporary criminal justice issues.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRJ 217 - Community Based Corrections

3 Credits

A seminar which explores alternatives to incarceration in centralized penal institutions. Problems of work-release and school-release programs are discussed. Management of halfway houses, probation, and parole are reviewed. The success and failure of community-based corrections programs in the United States and in Europe are also explored. Three class hours.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe the basis for community corrections as an alternative to incarceration.
2. Explain the historical development of community corrections.
3. Discuss contemporary trends in deinstitutionalization.
4. Explain how community-based corrections or diversion is a component of a comprehensive corrections system.
5. Define the different forms of diversion programs.
6. Evaluate the need for various services within pre-trial release programs.
7. Compare and contrast probation and parole.
8. Evaluate critically the effectiveness of various community corrections programs currently utilized in the United States.

Course Offered Fall only

CRJ 290 - Independent Study

Variable Credit

See the Department Chairperson.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CSC - Computer Science
DAS - Dental Assisting
DEN - Dental Hygiene
EBL - Experience Based Learning
ECE - Education and Early Care
ECO - Economics
EDU - Education
ELT - Electrical Engineering Technology/Electronics
EMS - Emergency Medical Services
ENG - English Literature
ENG - English Writing
ENR - Engineering Science
ESL - English For Speakers Of Other Languages (ESOL)
FPT - Fire Protection Technology
FRE - French/Foreign Language
FSA - Food Service Administration
GEG - Geography
GEO - Geology
GER - German/Foreign Language
GLF - Golf Management
HBR - Hebrew/Foreign Language
HED - Health Education
HEG - Health Education Global
HIM - Health Information Technology
HIS - History
HMN - Humanities
HON - Honors Studies
HPR - Health Professions
HSM - Homeland Security Administration
HSP - Hospitality
HTL - Hotel Technology
HUM - Human Services
HVA - Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning
IDE - Interior Design
ITA - Italian/Foreign Language
JPN - Japanese/Foreign Language
LAW - Law
LDS - Leadership
MAR - Marketing
MET - Mechanical Technology
MFG - Manufacturing Technology: Automation / Robotics
MTH - Mathematics
MUS - Music
NUR - Nursing
OFT - Office Technology
OPT - Optical Systems Technology
PE - Physical Education--Coed
PEC - Physical Education--Coed
PEJ - Physical Education-Criminal Justice
PEM - Physical Education--Men
PEW - Physical Education-Women
PHL - Philosophy
PHO - Photography
PHY - Physics
PLE - Police: Law Enforcement
PLS - Paralegal Studies
POR - Portuguese/Foreign Language
POS - Political Science
PPE - Physical Studies/Physical Education
PSC - Public Safety Communications
PSC - Public Safety Training
PST - Public Safety Training
PSY - Psychology
REA - Reading
SBS - Honors Studies
SBS - Social & Behavioral Sciences
SCI - Science
SCR - Computer Security
SGT - Surgical Technology
SMT - Sports Management
SOC - Sociology
SPA - Spanish/Foreign Language
SPC - Speech Communication
STT - Solar Thermal Technology
SUS - Sustainability Studies
SVL - Service Learning
TAM - Tooling and Machining
TEK - Technology
THE - Theatre
TOY - Toyota
TRS - Transitional Studies
TVL - Travel And Tourism
XRT - Radiologic Technology