Course Descriptions

The following is a complete listing of courses offered at MCC. You can also visit our Programs of Study page for a list of course requirements necessary to complete your degree.

AAD - Applied Art and Design
ACC - Accounting
ACD - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency
AGS - Agricultural Studies
ANT - Anthropology
ARA - Arabic/Foreign Language
ART - Art
ASL - American Sign Language/Foreign Language
ATP - Automotive Technology
BIO - Biology
BUS - Business
CDL - Interdisciplinary
CE - Cooperative Education-Disney World
CE - Hospitality
CE - Office Technology
CEL - Leadership
CHE - Chemistry
CHI - Chinese/Foreign Language
CIN - Cinema Studies
CIS - Computer Information Systems
CIT - Civil and Construction Technology
CLT - Clinical Laboratory Technician
COM - Communication
COS - College Success
CPT - Computer Technology
CRC - Computer Related Curricula
CRJ - Criminal Justice
CSC - Computer Science
DAS - Dental Assisting
DEN - Dental Hygiene
EBL - Experience Based Learning
ECE - Education and Early Care
ECO - Economics
EDU - Education
ELT - Electrical Engineering Technology/Electronics
EMS - Emergency Medical Services
ENG - English Literature
ENG - English Writing
ENR - Engineering Science
ESL - English For Speakers Of Other Languages (ESOL)
FPT - Fire Protection Technology
FRE - French/Foreign Language
FSA - Food Service Administration
GEG - Geography
GEO - Geology
GER - German/Foreign Language
GLF - Golf Management
HBR - Hebrew/Foreign Language
HED - Health Education
HEG - Health Education Global
HIM - Health Information Technology
HIS - History
HMN - Humanities
HON - Honors Studies
HPR - Health Professions
HSM - Homeland Security Administration
HSP - Hospitality
HTL - Hotel Technology
HUM - Human Services
HVA - Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning
IDE - Interior Design
ITA - Italian/Foreign Language
JPN - Japanese/Foreign Language
LAW - Law
LDS - Leadership
MAR - Marketing
MET - Mechanical Technology
MFG - Manufacturing Technology: Automation / Robotics
MTH - Mathematics
MUS - Music
MUS 101 - Music Appreciation

3 Credits

Interest, taste and discrimination in music and its relationship to other art forms; survey of style periods of Western Music; Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Twentieth Century; survey of musical forms, instruments of the orchestra, and music in national cultures; biographical sketches of composers; listening to records essential. Three class hours. (SUNY-H)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Listen to and discuss musical examples from the Middle Ages to the 20th Century.
2. Analyze musical examples for form and content from the Middle Ages to the 20th Century.
3. Identify musical works by composers from the Middle Ages to the 20th Century.
4. Discuss the historical context for the major developments in Western music.
5. Analyze for the four musical textures in Western music from the Middle Ages to the 20th Century.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 108 - College Chorus

1 Credit

Performance of a wide variety of choral music. Musical selections range from traditional to contemporary and include such diverse styles as madrigals, songs, chorales, folk music, jazz and rock. Three class hours. (May be repeated for additional credit.) (SUNY-A)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate proper vocal production, including breath control and stylistically appropriate tone.
2. Identify the musical genres of selected music for the course
3. Produce proper vocal diction.
4. Participate in ensemble rehearsals.
5. Perform in public concerts

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 109 - Music Theory I

4 Credits

Instruction in music theory, ear-training, and sight-singing based on the techniques of the Common Practice Period. Activities include: sight-singing of diatonic melodies, melodic, harmonic and rhythmic dictation, study of intervals, scales, triads, the dominant seventh chord and non-harmonic tones in analysis, and the connection of triads in four-voice writing. Computer software is incorporated to reinforce music theory concepts and for ear training practice. Four class hours. (SUNY-A)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Read scales.
2. Read key signatures.
3. Read triads.
4. Read intervals.
5. Properly beam rhythms based on simple or compound time signatures.
6. Analyze simple melodies.
7. Analyze simple harmonies.
8. Write scales.
9. Write key signatures.
10. Write triads.
11. Write intervals.

Course Offered Fall only

MUS 110 - Music Theory II

4 Credits

This course is a continuation of the ear training, sight singing and written materials of MUS 109 in greater depth and detail. Instruction is based on the techniques of the Common Practice Period. Principles of harmonic progression, diatonic common chord modulation, non-harmonic tones, the Classic Period, developmental techniques and small homophonic forms. Computer software is incorporated to reinforce music theory concepts, for ear training practice, and to typeset homework assignments. Four class hours.

Prerequisite: MUS 109 or permission of the instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Read non-harmonic tones.
2. Read triads in a four-voice texture.
3. Read diatonic 7th chords in a four-voice texture.
4. Notate dictated chromatic melodies.
5. Operate music notation programs at a basic level.
6. Analyze intermediate melodies.
7. Analyze intermediate harmonies.
8. Write non-harmonic tones.
9. Write triads in a four-voice texture.
10. Write diatonic 7th chords in a four-voice texture.

Course Offered Spring only

MUS 113 - Song Writing

3 Credits

The study of successful song forms and creative imitation of student's own experience into original parodies and songs. Three class hours. (SUNY-A)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Analyze various song forms found in Blues, Simple songs or Pop songs.
2. Create an original Blues lyric based on the AAB form.
3. Compose an original melody.
4. Articulate good prosody or how words and music fit together.
5. Record at least one finished song in digital form.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 114 - Contemporary A Cappella Ensemble

1 Credit

Performance of the genre of contemporary a cappella music. Musical selections will range from a variety of contemporary popular genres such as Rhythm and Blues, Rock, Alternative, Soul, Fusion, and Hip Hop. Three class hours (May be repeated for additional credit.)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate proper vocal production, including breath control and stylistically appropriate tone.
2. Identify the musical genres of the selected music for the course.
3. Produce proper vocal diction.
4. Participate in ensemble rehearsals.
5. Perform in public concerts

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 118 - Broadway Musicals

3 Credits

A survey of musicals, revues and Broadway shows which represent the growth and development of American musical theatre as an art form. Students will learn to recognize and identify the characters, plot, best-known show tunes and other important facets of musical theatre. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Examine selected components of American Musical Theater from early 20th century to modern musical theater.
2. Examine how theater was influential in the development of our culture.
3. Articulate how one or more of the composers, lyricists, designers, directors, performers, producers, and choreographers developed the modern theater musical.
4. Examine the components of creating a musical theater production from concept and writing to the casting and producing of the final stage production.
5. Describe the creative relationship of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein with the development of the modern musical through the study of one or more librettos and view one or more film adaptations of their musical shows.

Course Offered Spring only

MUS 119 - Music in World Cultures

3 Credits

A diverse overview of classical, popular, and folk music traditions comprising all of the major world cultures. The objectives of the course are to look closely at how we define what music is and what social and cultural roles it serves in our lives. Students will listen to music from other cultures and discuss how the music reflects differences in the way that another society defines music and its role in their lives. This process will also show how diverse and global our own musical traditions already are. The course will also explore the role of music as ritual, mode of communication, work accompaniment and artistic expression. Three class hours, two experiential hours. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a social science elective. (SUNY-A/H)

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Define elements of music from all over the world.
2.Describe how our own popular, classical or folk music have been influenced by other cultures throughout history.
3.Differentiate between music as entertainment and as a vital element of a culture.
4.Classify the many different ways one can define, create, or interpret music.
5.Explain how closely related music is to one's culture and society historically.
6.Discuss the way in which they listen to or appreciate music.
7.Identify the differences, creativity or unique musical contributions of musical traditions from around the world, both historically and today.
8.Group and identify by ear the most influential musical artists from a variety of cultural history.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 120 - Jazz in American Society

3 Credits

A survey course in the evolution of jazz in America. Historical significances are identified and traced from rhythmic worksongs and spirituals of the late 1800s through avant-garde jazz of the 1970s. Specific concentration as to personalities and musical styles occurs for the major eras and trends in jazz; e.g., Ragtime, Dixieland, Swing, Bebop, Progressive, Modern, Third Stream, Rock, Jazz. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a social science elective. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Aurally identify the major eras in jazz history: Early New Orleans Jazz > Swing > Bebop > Cool > Hard Bop > Free Jazz > Fusion > Contemporary
2. Focus listening skills to hear and describe the music on multiple levels including meter, instrumentation, texture, and tempo.
3. Differentiate the sounds of two different voices on the same instrument. An example of this would be the two tenor saxophone players Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young. By listening to and discussing recordings of these two musicians, the students learn how to hear the differences in their tone, vocabulary and phrasing.
4. Evaluate the correlation between sociological developments in American society and artistic developments in jazz music.
5. Appraise and discuss the three stages (imitation, assimilation, innovation) of mastering any verbal, musical or artistic language.

Course Offered Fall only

MUS 121 - Voice Class

3 Credits

Group instruction in the mastery of vocal techniques, the study of common vocal problems, the development of basic musicianship and the cultivation of expressive singing ability. Students will perform songs covering a wide variety of moods, styles, and textual subjects. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate proper vocal production, including breath control and stylistically appropriate tone.
2. Produce proper vocal diction.
3. Perform correct style for a variety of solo songs, such as folk songs, Pop songs, Broadway show tunes and classical art songs
4. Perform in collaboration with instrumental accompaniment.
5. Perform music in a foreign language.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 122 - Piano Class I

3 Credits

Group instruction in fundamental piano technique designed for the beginner. Pupils learn to read music, improvise chordal accompaniments, and develop technical proficiency through performance of elementary piano music. Two class hours, one laboratory hour. (SUNY-A)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate basic note reading of piano pieces/exercises from textbook.
2. Perform solos and ensembles in a variety of styles.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 124 - Guitar Class I

3 Credits

An introductory course in the fundamentals of guitar playing, designed for the beginning student. A dual approach to the instrument will be taught: 1) as an accompaniment for singing; the student will learn chords, progressions, strums, and finger-picking; 2) as a solo instrument; the student will learn the fundamentals of reading music, as applied to the guitar; e.g. staff-notation, meters, rhythms, scales, positions with emphasis on developing dexterity. Three class hours. Students must provide their own guitars. (SUNY-A)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Memorize guitar strings, chords and scales.
2. Understand and demonstrate how to tune the guitar.
3. Interpret different folk songs.
4. Perform basic classical guitar repertoire.
5. Make up simple blues improvisations.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 126 - Applied Piano Minor I

1 Credit

A practical course in piano skills (scales, arpeggios, improvisation and accompanying) designed for students currently studying a major applied instrument or major vocal applied. Students should possess skills in music theory and be able to read music. One and one-half laboratory hours. (SUNY-A)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Perform major scales with correct fingering with the right hand two octaves up and down.
2. Perform major scales with correct fingering with the left hand two octaves up and down.
3. Perform major scales with correct fingering with the both hands together one octave up and down.
4. Perform selected piano solos in a variety of styles.

Course Offered Fall only

MUS 127 - Applied Piano Minor II

1 Credit

A continuation of MUS 126 for students currently studying voice or an instrument. One and one-half laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: MUS 126 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Perform harmonic and melodic minor scales with correct fingering with the right hand two octaves up and down.
2. Perform harmonic and melodic minor scales with correct fingering with the left hand two octaves up and down.
3. Perform harmonic and melodic minor scales with correct fingering with the both hands one octave up and down.
4. Transpose selected pieces and exercises at the interval of major and minor seconds.
5. Perform selected piano solos in a variety of styles.

Course Offered Spring only

MUS 129 - MIDI Recording Techniques

3 Credits

An introductory course in computer-assisted music production. Students will learn the fundamentals of the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) as they pertain to MCC's own MIDI studio. Using the synthesizer, drum machine and tone generator, students will produce high quality demo tapes of the music of their choice. Three class hours. (SUNY-A)

Prerequisite: Basic keyboard proficiency or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate use of digital keyboards, MIDI interfaces, and computer-based sequencing software to produce a multitrack music demo.
2. Memorize pull down menus in a digital recording & sequencing software program as well report and be tested on text readings.
3. Demonstrate understanding of the MIDI studio environment by employing production techniques efficiently, exporting to notation programs to print music out/publish music, and using other MIDI associated programs like ear training programs in a MIDI environment.
4. Compose and arrange original music, choose sound programs, textures, chord progressions, and melodies to express one's creativity through 16 channel multi-timbral synthesizer keyboards, and then converting to a WAV or AIFF to be burned onto a compact disc.
5. Discuss history of MIDI's development since 1983 in class and evaluate MIDI sequence 'events' versus larger files of real time samples of digital audio waveforms, how they differentiate in usefulness and how they can be used separately or together to finish a demo project.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 131 - Studio Production

3 Credits

Designed to give the students practical experience in recording live music using digital multi-track recorders. The students will understand the use of microphones, mixers, multi-effects units and MIDI (Musical Instruments Digitally Interfaced) applications. Students will be given an overview of how past, present and future technological changes in the music industry impact recording techniques. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: MUS 129 is strongly recommended.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Choose an appropriate microphone from various types of dynamic or 48 volt-powered condenser microphones available for recording one or more specific instruments (ex. piano, drums, bass, guitar) in a recording studio environment.
2. Place a microphone at an appropriate distance and angle from a sound source for optimum capture of that sound in a recording studio environment.
3. Engage HPF (high pass filter, a.k.a. bass roll-off) and attenuation pad switches on a condenser microphone when appropriate to record for capturing the best possible sound.
4. Reproduce procedures for setting input levels on studio preamps going to recording media (computer hard drive) via USB or firewire connections.
5. Describe and recreate signal flow to track multiple channels of audio to corresponding digital channels on a software audio recording program at various sampling rates and bit resolution for quality recordings.
6. Alter recorded sounds utilizing one or more DSP (digital signal processing) effects such as echo, reverb, delay, dynamics, or EQ (equalization) in a recording studio environment.
7. Blend volumes of various audio recorded channels and determine their placement in a stereo sound field (panning) together to create a final stereo mix.
8. Bounce multiple channels of audio down to create a master stereo audio wave form (.AIFF or .WAV) to burn to a CD.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 140 - Jazz Ensemble

1 Credit

Rehearsal and performance of jazz, Latin, and pop instrumental, music for big band (piano, bass, drums, saxophones, trumpets, trombones, and guitar). Rehearsals include study of playing with good time, intonation, jazz inflections, articulations, and correct interpretation of classic jazz literature to modern styles. Concert performances include major concerts twice each semester in MCC's Theatre, and there is the potential for additional on-campus or off-campus performances. (This course may be repeated for credit.) Three laboratory hours, 10+ experiential hours.

Prerequisite: Prior experience in a jazz band or permission of instructor. Recommended corequisites: MUS 143/144 is highly recommended .

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Reproduce melodic and rhythmic note patterns in published musical arrangements by repeated rehearsal in class towards a goal of a successful performance in concert.
2. Recognize how to balance one's sound and tuning against others in a small section (brass, woodwinds, rhythm section) and then the larger group by active listening and following director's conducting and visual cues.
3. Analyze and critique recorded student performances by listening to professional recordings and then comparing them to the recordings of student performances.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 141 - Madrigal Singers

1 Credit

A select group of singers rehearsing and performing vocal music from the Medieval and Renaissance time periods. Emphasis will be on developing musicianship and ensemble singing with the goal of understanding these musical styles and experiencing the joy of public performance. May be repeated for additional credit. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: Audition or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate proper vocal production, including breath control and stylistically appropriate tone.
2. Identify the musical genres of the selected music for the course.
3. Produce proper vocal diction.
4. Participate in ensemble rehearsals.
5. Perform in public concerts.

Course Offered Fall only

MUS 142 - Musical Production

3 Credits

A select group of actor/singers and musicians whose main goal is to rehearse and perform a Broadway musical production. Students will learn the vocal and dance portion of performing in a full scale musical production. Students will experience costumed and staged live performances. May be repeated for additional credit. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: Audition or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate proper vocal production, including breath control and stylistically appropriate tone.
2. Discuss the historical context of the programmed musical.
3. Produce proper vocal diction.
4. Participate in musical rehearsals.
5. Perform in public concerts.

Course Offered Fall only

MUS 145 - Jazz Combo

1 Credit

Rehearsal and performance of traditional jazz standards, Latin, avant-garde and pop instrumental, music for small combo (piano, bass, drums, guitar, and some horns such as saxophone and trumpet ). Rehearsals include study of playing compositions with an emphasis on improvising in a small group format. Correct interpretation of classic jazz literature to modern styles is studied in this context of a small combo. Concert performances include major concerts twice each semester in MCC's Theatre, Atrium, or Student Center and there is the potential for additional on-campus or off-campus performances. (This course may be repeated for credit.) Three laboratory hours, 10+ experiential hours.

Prerequisite: Prior experience improvising in a jazz band or permission of instructor; corequisite: MUS 143/MUS 144 is highly recommended

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Read music and recall previous rehearsals in class for correct way to perform music studied.
2. Interpret different forms and styles in performing traditional jazz standards, Latin, avant-garde and pop instrumental within the general classification of jazz in a small group format.
3. Apply and demonstrate jazz feel, articulation, melodic-haromonic concepts, and rhythms in rehearsal and performance.
4. Criticize and evaluate performances through CD recordings of student concerts and studio recordings as well as in rehearsals in class for the purpose of improving one's performance and understanding of this American art form.
5. Create spontaneous (improvised) solos over harmonic structures studied in class that 'tell a story', draw the listener in, thereby demonstrating knowledge of jazz music vocabulary.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 146 - Vocal Jazz/Show Choir

1 Credit

A select group of singers and instrumentalists rehearsing and performing vocal music from the jazz and show choir repertoire. Emphasis will be on developing musicianship and ensemble singing with the goal of understanding these musical styles and experiencing the joy of public performance. May be repeated for additional credit. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: Audition or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Produce proper vocal production for vocal jazz such as straight tone, scoops and fall offs.
2. Identify the musical genres of the selected music for the course.
3. Perform in public concerts.
4. Participate in ensemble rehearsals.
5. Produce proper vocal diction for various vocal jazz and show tune styles.

Course Offered Spring only

MUS 150 - History of Rock 'n Roll

3 Credits

A survey course that traces the roots of rock 'n roll from its origins in blues and rock 'a billy through to present day styles. In addition to the musical styles, the course will also look at the cultural, economic and social influences that shaped this American musical pheonmena. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a social science elective. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify different Rock styles.
2. Create concert reviews of live concerts.
3. Compare cover recordings to originals.
4. Write papers on various topics related to Rock 'n Roll.
5. Research a favorite band for the final project.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 151 - Music Performance and Lessons

2 Credits

Provides students with an opportunity to develop their music abilities through solo or ensemble performances before college audiences, through individualized private study of instrumental or vocal music under the supervision of qualified teachers. A recital is performed during the semester in class and a jury (musical exam) is performed for the music faculty during exam week. A minimum of twelve (12) one-hour lessons is required. Cost of lessons is not included in MCC tuition. Technology of recording is studied including selection and placement of microphones, mixing of tracks to a digital computer program, and conversion to MP3s to create an audio portfolio. One class hour plus one hour of private instruction. (May be repeated for additional credit.) (SUNY-A) 2 Credits.

Prerequisite: Music Department audition.

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Demonstrate technical studies, etudes, and compositions assigned by private teacher on your primary instrument by analyzing individual components in a piece of music (melody, harmony, rhythm, phrasing, diction, articulation, pitch, tone) resulting in a performance in a recital in class.
2.Memorize at least one composition to be performed as one of three contrasting pieces to be performed in a jury in a formal music exam.
3.Listen, critique, and evaluate recording of recital with private teacher to show what has been accomplished and where there is need for improvement.
4.Interpret musical phrases with respect to dynamics, tempo, intensity, and other artistic as well as technical parameters of a musical performance by adding one's own individual stylistic ideas.
5.Communicate individual expression and feelings by thorough examination and practice of a piece of music, adding emotional content resulting in a refined technically accurate and spiritually moving performance culminating in a complete experience for the listener.
6.Choose an appropriate microphone(s) for recording specific instruments or set input levels to digital recording software for CD quality recording.
7.Mix down (balance volumes, edit, add EFX to recital tracks) to stereo and convert to MP3.
8.Dub a copy of the MP3 onto CD or flash drive for future college auditions or audio portfolio.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 159 - Aural Skills I

1 Credit

This course reinforces Music Theory concepts and develops skills in sight singing as well as melodic and rhythmic dictation. One class hour.

Corequisite: MUS 109 or permission of instructor

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Transfer and apply scales from Music Theory I to the development of Aural Skills.
2. Sight read rhythms separate from melodies.
3. Sight sing intervals and diatonic melodies in tune with solfege and numbers.
4. Transcribe music in regards to intervals, rhythms, and diatonic melodies.
5. Transfer and apply key signatures from Music Theory I to sight sing melodies.

Course Offered Fall only

MUS 160 - Aural Skills II

1 Credit

This course is a continuation of Aural Skills I. It reinforces Music Theory concepts and develops skills in sight singing as well as melodic and rhythmic dictation. One class hour.

Prerequisite: MUS 159 or permission of instructor; corequisite: MUS 110 or permission of instructor

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Apply chromatic melodies of Music Theory II into the development of Aural Skills.
2. Sight sing diatonic and chromatic melodies in tune with numbers and solfege.
3. Take accurate music dictation of diatonic and chromatic melodies.
4. Sight sing arppeggiated chords in major and minor.
5. Transcribe intermediate melodies.

Course Offered Spring only

MUS 201 - History of Music I

3 Credits

Music from antiquity through 1750, covering Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque style periods; essential score reading and listening to records outside of class. Three class hours. This course fulfills the MCC requirement of humanities or social science elective. (SUNY-WC)

Prerequisites: Completion of a music theory course or music appreciation, and elementary skill in music reading or permission of the instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Listen to and discuss musical examples from Antiquity to the Baroque Period.
2. Analyze musical examples for form and content from Antiquity to the Baroque Period.
3. Identify musical works by composers from Antiquity to the Baroque Period.
4. Discuss the historical context for the major developments in Western music.
5. Analyze for the four musical textures in Western music from Antiquity to the Baroque Period.
6. Discuss the change in Western tuning systems from Pathagorian to equal temperament.
7. Discuss the role of technology in the development of music halls and instruments.

Course Offered Fall only

MUS 202 - History of Music II

3 Credits

Music from 1750 through the present covering Classical, Romantic and Twentieth Century style periods; essential score reading and listening to records outside of class. Three class hours. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a humanities or social science elective. (SUNY-WC)

Prerequisite: MUS 201 or permission of the instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Listen to and discuss musical examples from the Classical period to the 20th Century.
2. Analyze musical examples for form and content from the Classical period to the 20th Century.
3. Identify musical works by composers from the Classical period to the 20th Century.
4. Discuss the historical context for the major developments in Western music.
5. Analyze for the four musical textures in Western music from the Classical period to the 20th Century.
6. Discuss the role of technology in the development of music halls, instruments, and audio recording.

Course Offered Spring only

MUS 209 - Music Theory III

4 Credits

A study of diatonic seventh chords, borrowed chords, secondary dominants, augmented sixth chords, chromatic and in harmonic modulation and musical forms of the Classic and Romantic Periods, sight-singing and harmonic and melodic dictation related to chromatic harmony, early 20th century techniques. Computer software is incorporated to reinforce music theory concepts, for ear training practice, and to typeset homework assignments. Four class hours.

Prerequisite: MUS 110 or permission of the instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Read harmonic progressions using secondary dominant chords.
2. Read harmonic progressions using secondary leading tone chords.
3. Read harmonic progressions using borrowed chords.
4. Read harmonic progressions using the Neapolitan chord.
5. Read harmonic progressions using augmented 6th chords.
6. Analyze advanced melodies.
7. Analyze advanced harmonies.
8. Write harmonic progressions using secondary dominant chords.
9. Write harmonic progressions using secondary leading tone chords.
10. Write harmonic progressions using borrowed chords.
11. Write harmonic progressions using the Neapolitan chord.
12. Write harmonic progressions using augmented 6th chords.

Course Offered Fall only

MUS 210 - Music Theory IV

4 Credits

Studies of 20th century techniques, with student compositions performed and evaluated in class. Computer software is incorporated to reinforce music theory concepts, for ear training practice, and to typeset homework assignments. Four class hours.

Prerequisite: MUS 209 or permission of the instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Read modal music.
2. Read nonfunctional music.
3. Read impressionistic music.
4. Read serial music.
5. Read music using advanced (higher-numbered) chords.
6. Analyze music of the 20th century.
7. Write modal music.
8. Write nonfunctional music.
9. Write impressionistic music.
10. Write serial music.
11. Write music using advanced (higher-numbered) chords.

Course Offered Spring only

MUS 221 - Voice Class II

3 Credits

Intermediate collegiate level study of vocal music with emphasis on developing diction, breath control, increasing vocal resonance, improving stage presence, and cultivating accuracy, artistry and musicianship. Students will study a wide variety of vocal materials; e.g., Elizabethian lute songs, classical and romantic art songs, as well as standards, "pop" styles, and Broadway show tunes. Three class hours.

Prerequisites: MUS 121, prior vocal experience, or by audition.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate proper breath support.
2. Reproduce Bel Canto style vocal production.
3. Interpret and perform a wide variety of advanced solo repertoire.
4. Articulate good diction.
5. Perform advanced singing styles in recital.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 226 - Applied Piano Minor III

1 Credit

A course designed to increase essential keyboard skills and score reading; improve technique through the study and performance of collegiate level intermediate difficulty piano studies; and provide instruction in proper methods of accompanying, melodic and harmonic improvisation, and transposition. One and one-half laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: MUS 127 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate score sight-reading of piano pieces/exercises from textbook and perform pieces with intermediate college-level piano technique.
2. Apply music theory knowledge and piano technique to synthesize appropriate accompaniments melodically, harmonically, and transpositionally.

Course Offered Fall only

MUS 227 - Applied Piano Minor IV

1 Credit

A continuation of practical keyboard studies at the advanced intermediate (collegiate) level of study. Continued development of keyboard skills including SATB vocal score reading, harmonization, improvisation, transposition, and modulation. Instrumental score reading and instrumental accompaniment. One and one-half laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: MUS 226 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate four part SATB (soprano, alto, tenor, bass) score reading with advanced intermediate piano technique.
2. Produce instrumental accompaniment, creating harmonization, modulation and improvisation based on simple melodies and chord symbol analysis.

Course Offered Spring only

MUS 253 - Music Business

3 Credits

This course will introduce the student to the different facets of the music business. The course will aim to increase the participant's knowledge of the inner workings of the business, as well as how they relate to one another. Areas of concentration are music publishing, income sources, recording studios, copyrights, recording companies, and other related avenues. Whether the student wants a career in teaching or performing, this course will give an overview of some of the things to expect. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Analyze career options in the Music Business.
2. Summarize how the Music Business works.
3. Interpret general copyright law.

Course Offered Spring only

MUS 259 - Aural Skills III

1 Credit

This course is a continuation of Aural Skills II. It reinforces Music Theory concepts and develops skills in sight singing as well as melodic and rhythmic dictation. One class hour.

Prerequisite: MUS 160 or permission of instructor; corequisite: MUS 209 or permission of instructor

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Transfer and apply harmonic progressions of Music Theory III into the development of Aural Skills.
2. Sight sing and transpose diatonic and chromatic melodies.
3. Accurately take music dictation of diatonic progressions.
4. Transcribe advanced melodies.
5. Transcribe bass line and soprano lines in a simple harmonic progression.

Course Offered Fall only

MUS 260 - Aural Skills IV

1 Credit

This course is a continuation of Aural Skills III. It reinforces Music Theory concepts and develops skills in sight singing as well as melodic and rhythmic dictation. One class hour.

Prerequisite: MUS 259 or permission of instructor; corequisite: MUS 210 or permission of instructor

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Apply advanced chord structures of Music Theory IV into the development of Aural Skills.
2. Sight sing modal, chromatic, and modulating melodies.
3. Take accurate music dictation of modal, chromatic, or modulating progressions.
4. Sight sing advanced melodic or harmonic progressions.
5. Transcribe 4 part harmonies in simple or intermediate harmonic progressions.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

MUS 290 - Independent Study

Variable Credit

See the Department Chairperson.

Course Offered Fall only

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