Course Descriptions

The following is a complete listing of courses offered at MCC. You can also visit our Programs of Study page for a list of course requirements necessary to complete your degree.

AAD - Applied Art and Design
ACC - Accounting
ACD - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency
AGS - Agricultural Studies
ANT - Anthropology
ARA - Arabic/Foreign Language
ART - Art
ASL - American Sign Language/Foreign Language
ATP - Automotive Technology
BIO - Biology
BUS - Business
CDL - Interdisciplinary
CE - Cooperative Education-Disney World
CE - Hospitality
CE - Office Technology
CEL - Leadership
CHE - Chemistry
CHI - Chinese/Foreign Language
CIN - Cinema Studies
CIS - Computer Information Systems
CIT - Civil and Construction Technology
CLT - Clinical Laboratory Technician
COM - Communication
COS - College Success
CPT - Computer Technology
CRC - Computer Related Curricula
CRJ - Criminal Justice
CSC - Computer Science
DAS - Dental Assisting
DEN - Dental Hygiene
EBL - Experience Based Learning
ECE - Education and Early Care
ECO - Economics
EDU - Education
ELT - Electrical Engineering Technology/Electronics
EMS - Emergency Medical Services
ENG - English Literature
ENG - English Writing
ENR - Engineering Science
ESL - English For Speakers Of Other Languages (ESOL)
FPT - Fire Protection Technology
FRE - French/Foreign Language
FSA - Food Service Administration
GEG - Geography
GEO - Geology
GER - German/Foreign Language
GLF - Golf Management
HBR - Hebrew/Foreign Language
HED - Health Education
HEG - Health Education Global
HIM - Health Information Technology
HIS - History
HMN - Humanities
HON - Honors Studies
HPR - Health Professions
HSM - Homeland Security Administration
HSP - Hospitality
HTL - Hotel Technology
HUM - Human Services
HVA - Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning
IDE - Interior Design
ITA - Italian/Foreign Language
JPN - Japanese/Foreign Language
LAW - Law
LDS - Leadership
MAR - Marketing
MET - Mechanical Technology
MFG - Manufacturing Technology: Automation / Robotics
MTH - Mathematics
MUS - Music
NUR - Nursing
OFT - Office Technology
OPT - Optical Systems Technology
PE - Physical Education--Coed
PEC - Physical Education--Coed
PEJ - Physical Education-Criminal Justice
PEM - Physical Education--Men
PEW - Physical Education-Women
PHL - Philosophy
PHO - Photography
PHY - Physics
PHY 100 - Preparatory Physics

4 Credits

This course is suggested for those who have not successfully completed high school physics or have an inadequate preparation in mathematics or physics. It is also a preparatory course for students intending to follow the Applied Physics sequence. Topics will include problem solving techniques, velocity, acceleration, force, Newton’s Laws of Motion, momentum, energy, and conservation laws. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a natural science elective. Three class hours, two laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: MTH 104 or MTH 135 taken concurrently or previously completed.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Apply good problem solving techniques to the solution of physics word problems.
2. Determine the solution of motion problems using the equations of constant acceleration and Newton’s laws of motion.
3. Analyze the motion of particles using energy and momentum conservation.
4. Use proper techniques in lab to measure position, velocity, mass and force.
5. Apply the methods of algebra in the solution of mechanics problems.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHY 105 - Automotive Physics

4 Credits

The objective of this course is to provide automotive technicians with an understanding of the physical principles that apply to the automotive systems that they must maintain and repair. Topics will include mechanics, gases, fluids, heat transfer, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and electronics. Proper use of measurement equipment and data acquisition systems will be stressed. (SUNY-NS).

Prerequisite: Permission of the Automotive Technology Program Coordinator.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify the physical principles that govern the function of common automotive components.
2. Explain how automotive components function using physical concepts.
3. Solve for an unknown variable in a word problem involving a physical concept related to an automotive component or system.
4. Accurately record data using physics equipment.
5. Perform an experiment.
6. Assemble a mechanical apparatus.
7. Measure the electrical properties of circuitry.
8. Perform precise calculations using experimental data.
9. Draw conclusions from experimental results.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHY 120 - Physics for Non-Majors Laboratory

1 Credit

A laboratory course to supplement class lectures in PHY 121. Exercises will cover motion, Newton's Laws, energy, electricity, magnetism, optics and modern physics. Computers will be used extensively to collect and analyze data, process video images, and run simulations. Two laboratory hours. NOTE: This course only meets SUNY General Education Natural Science requirements when both PHY 120 and PHY 121 are successfully completed. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisites: PHY 121 may be taken concurrently or previously completed.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate competency with basic lab instruments.
2. Differentiate between good and bad data.
3. Construct a rudimentary hypothesis.
4. Write a reasonable conclusion for a laboratory experiment.
5. Explain the answer to a physics question using physics concepts and deductive/inductive reasoning.
6. Predict the outcome of an experiment using physics concepts and deductive reasoning.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHY 121 - Physics for Non-Majors I

3 Credits

A non-mathematical course in classical and modern physics; intended for those seeking a natural science elective. Topics include gravitation, electricity and magnetism, the nature of light, Einstein's Theories of Relativity, Quantum Mechanics, blackholes, and the Big Bang. Students interested in taking a transferable laboratory science course should enroll in PHY 120 concurrently. Three class hours. NOTE: Students who successfully complete PHY 121 may, with addition of PHY 120, complete the requirement of SUNY Natural Science General Education. PHY 120 may be taken concurrently or in a later semester, but the student will not have satisfied the SUNY requirement until both PHY 120 and PHY 121 are successfully completed. (SUNY-NS)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain the scientific method, its strengths, and its limitations.
2. Apply knowledge of science to determine whether a claim is scientific.
3. Summarize the history of science especially as it applies to how scientific knowledge is continuing to evolve.
4. State the concepts and relationships of classical physics.
5. Employ the utility of science in addressing social issues such as global warming or resource depletion.
6. Identify information on topics in modern physics, especially in areas such as: special relativity, general relativity, cosmology, or quantum mechanics.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHY 131 - Applied Physics I

4 Credits

An introductory course in physics at an intermediate mathematical level. Appropriate for non-science majors and those in the engineering technologies. Topics to include statics, dynamics, mechanical work and energy, conservation of momentum, and rotational dynamics. Three class hours, two laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite: MTH 140 or MTH 165 taken concurrently or previously completed.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Solve a 1-step vector problem using elementary trigonometry.
2. Solve a 1-step 2-D kinematics problem using elementary trigonometry.
3. Solve a 2-step Newton's laws of motion problem using algebra.
4. Solve a 1-step work and energy problem using algebra.
5. Solve a 1-step simple machines problem for a new physical situation using algebra.
6. Solve a 1-step impulse and momentum problem using algebra.
7. Solve a 1-step rotational kinematics problem using algebra.
8. Solve a 2-step rotational statics and dynamics problem using algebra.
9. Demonstrate competency with basic lab instruments.
10. Differentiate between good and bad data.
11. Write a conclusion for a laboratory experiment.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHY 132 - Applied Physics II

4 Credits

A continuation of PHY 131. Topics to include the properties of materials, temperature, heat and thermodynamics, vibrational motion, wave motion, sound, and geometrical and physical optics. Three class hours, two laboratory hours.

Prerequisites: PHY 131; MTH 141 or MTH 165 taken concurrently or previously completed.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Solve a 1-step temperature and the kinetic theory of gases problem that requires algebra.
2. Solve a 1-step thermal expansion problem that requires algebra.
3. Solve a 2-step mechanical waves problem using algebra.
4. Solve a 1-step superposition and standing waves problem using trigonometry and algebra.
5. Solve a 2-step reflection and refraction of light problem using algebra.
6. Solve a 1-step interference and diffraction problem using algebra.
7. Demonstrate competency with basic lab instruments.
8. Differentiate between good and bad data.
9. Write a conclusion for a laboratory experiment.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHY 141 - Radiographic Physics

3 Credits

An introductory course in electricity, magnetism, and radiation physics, stressing the basic principles underlying the operation of x-ray equipment and auxiliary devices. Topics will include AC and DC circuits, electromagnetism, electronics, production and detection of x-rays, and x-ray machine circuitry. Spring semester only. Two class hours, two laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite: XRT 111

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain the scientific method as it applies to measurements, analysis, and problem solving.
2. Apply appropriate mathematical techniques to problem solving.
3. State the fundamental principles of electrical engineering as relevant to radiologic equipment.
4. Discuss the physical nature of x-rays.
5. Describe the processes that produce x-rays in radiological equipment.
6. Demonstrate competency with basic lab instruments.
7. Differentiate between good and bad data.
8. Write a reasonable conclusion for a laboratory experiment.

Course Offered Spring only

PHY 145 - College Physics I

4 Credits

An introductory course in classical mechanics at the mathematical level of intermediate algebra and trigonometry. Intended for transfer students seeking a laboratory science elective and for those in life science and pre-professional programs. Topics include vectors, translational and rotational kinematics and dynamics, work and energy, impulse and momentum, and simple harmonic motion. Available both fall and spring, and summer. Three class hours, two laboratory hours, one conference hour. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite: Either MTH 140 or MTH 165 taken concurrently or previously completed.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Solve a 2-step vector problem using trigonometry.
2. Solve a 2-step 1-D kinematics problem using algebra.
3. Solve a 2-step Newton's laws of motion problem for a new physical situation using algebra.
4. Solve a 1-step work and energy problem using algebra.
5. Solve a 3-step impulse and momentum problem using trigonometry.
6. Solve a 1-step rotational kinematics problem using algebra.
7. Solve a 3-step rotational statics and dynamics problem for a new physical situation using algebra.
8. Solve a 1-step simple harmonic motion problem using algebra.
9. Demonstrate competency with lab instruments.
10. Differentiate between valid and invalid data.
11. Write a conclusion for a laboratory experiment.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHY 146 - College Physics II

4 Credits

A continuation of PHY 145. Topics include electrostatics, electric potential and energy, DC circuits, magnetism and electromagnetic induction, electromagnetic waves and wave properties, optics, and modern physics. Available both fall and spring. Three class hours, two laboratory hours, one conference hour. (SUNY-NS)

(Prerequisites: PHY 145 with a grade of C or higher; MTH 141 (may be taken concurrently)or MTH 165.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Solve a 2-step electric forces and fields problem using trigonometry.
2. Solve a 1-step electric potential problem using algebra.
3. Solve a 3-step electric current and circuits problem for a new situation using algebra.
4. Solve a 2-step magnetic forces and fields problem using trigonometry.
5. Solve a 1-step electromagnetic induction problem using algebra.
6. Solve a 2-step alternating current problem using algebra.
7. Solve a 2-step electromagnetic waves problem using algebra.
8. Solve a 2-step reflection and refraction of light problem using algebra.
9. Solve a 2-step interference and diffraction problem using algebra.
10. Solve a 2-step modern physics problem using algebra.
11. Demonstrate competency with lab instruments.
12. Differentiate between good and bad data.
13. Write a conclusion for a laboratory experiment.
14. Design a rudimentary experiment.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHY 154 - General Physics I

4 Credits

An introductory course in classical mechanics and waves using calculus. The course is intended primarily for transfer students pursuing computer science and pre-professional programs that require the study of physics using calculus. Offered only during the summer session. Three class hours, three laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite: MTH 210 completed prior to beginning PHY 154.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Solve a 2-step vector problem using trigonometry and algebra.
2. Solve a 2-step 2-D kinematics problem that requires a symbolic solution.
3. Solve a 3-step Newton's laws of motion problem for a new physical situation using calculus.
4. Solve a 2-step work and energy problem using algebra.
5. Solve a 3-step impulse and momentum problem using trigonometry and algebra.
6. Solve a 2-step special relativity problem for a new physical situation using algebra.
7. Solve a 2-step rotational kinematics problem using calculus.
8. Solve a 2-step oscillations problem that requires a symbolic solution.
9. Solve a 2-step mechanical waves problem using trigonometry and algebra.
10. Solve a 2-step superposition and standing waves problem using trigonometry and algebra.
11. Solve a 2-step fluid mechanics problem for a new physical situation using algebra.
12. Solve a 2-step temperature and the kinetic theory of gases problem that requires a symbolic solution.
13. Demonstrate competency with lab instruments.
14. Differentiate between good and bad data.
15. Evaluate data using error analysis.
16. Write a hypothesis for a laboratory experiment.
17. Write a conclusion for a laboratory experiment.
18. Design an experiment.

Course Offered Summer only

PHY 155 - General Physics II

4 Credits

A continuation of PHY 154. Topics to include electricity and magnetism, DC and AC circuits, optics, and topics from modern physics. Offered only during the summer session. Three class hours, three laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite: PHY 154 with a grade of C or higher.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Solve a 2-step electric forces and fields problem using trigonometry.
2. Solve a 1-step electric potential problem using calculus.
3. Solve a 3-step electric current and circuits problem for a new situation using algebra.
4. Solve a 2-step magnetic forces and fields problem using trigonometry.
5. Solve a 1-step electromagnetic induction problem using calculus.
6. Solve a 2-step alternating current problem using algebra.
7. Solve a 2-step electromagnetic waves problem using algebra.
8. Solve a 2-step reflection and refraction of light problem using algebra.
9. Solve a 3-step interference and diffraction problem using algebra.
10. Solve a 2-step modern physics problem using algebra.
11. Demonstrate competency with lab instruments.
12. Differentiate between good and bad data.
13. Write a conclusion for a laboratory experiment.
14. Design a rudimentary experiment.

Course Offered Summer only

PHY 161 - University Physics 1

4 Credits

An introductory course in classical mechanics using calculus; intended for those seeking a concentration in engineering, mathematics, or natural science. Topics include kinematics, Newton's Laws, work, energy, momentum, rotational motion of rigid bodies, and harmonic motion. Three class hours, three laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisites: MTH 211 taken concurrently or previously completed; high school Regents physics with a grade of 70 or higher or PHY 131 with a grade of C or higher, or PHY 145 with a grade of C or higher.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Solve a 2-step vector problem using trigonometry and calculus.
2. Solve a 2-step 1-D kinematics problem that requires a symbolic solution.
3. Solve a 3-step Newton's laws of motion problem for a new physical situation using algebra.
4. Solve a 2-step work and energy problem using algebra.
5. Solve a 3-step impulse and momentum problem that requires a symbolic solution.
6. Solve a 2-step rotational kinematics problem using calculus.
7. Solve a 3-step rotational dynamics problem for a new physical situation using calculus.
8. Demonstrate competency with complex lab instruments.
9. Differentiate between good and bad data.
10. Evaluate data using error analysis.
11. Write a hypothesis for a laboratory experiment.
12. Draw a conclusion for a laboratory experiment and rewrite a hypothesis.
13. Design a complex experiment.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHY 261 - University Physics II

4 Credits

An introduction to electric and magnetic fields. Topics include Coulomb's, Gauss's, Biot-Savart, Ampere's, Faraday's Laws, and Maxwell's Equations. Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

Prerequisite(s): PHY 161 with a grade of C or higher and MTH 211 with a grade of C or higher.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Solve for the net electric field from two or more discrete charges.
2. Solve for the electric field from a continuous charge distribution using calculus.
3. Solve for the net magnetic field from current-carrying wires.
4. Solve for the trajectory of a charged particle moving in a magnetic field.
5. Solve a 2-step electromagnetic induction problem using calculus.
6. Solve for the time response of a resistor and capacitor circuit.
7. Solve a 2-step electromagnetic waves problem using algebra.
8. Solve a double-slit interference problem.
9. Demonstrate competency with complex lab instruments.
10. Differentiate between good and bad data.
11. Evaluate data using error analysis.
12. Write a hypothesis for a laboratory experiment.
13. Draw a conclusion from a laboratory experiment and rewrite a hypothesis, if necessary.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHY 262 - Modern Physics

4 Credits

An introductory course in modern physics for those who have completed two semesters of University Physics. Topics include relativity, quantum mechanics, and the application of quantum mechanics to atomic and nuclear structure. Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

Prerequisites: PHY 261 with a grade of C or higher; MTH 212 or MTH 225 taken concurrently or previously completed.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Solve a relativistic velocity addition problem.
2. Solve a problem requiring the use of the Lorentz transformation.
3. Solve a relativistic collision problem requiring energy and momentum conservation.
4. Solve a diffraction of matter waves problem.
5. Solve the Schrodinger equation for a piecewise-constant potential.
6. Solve for the expectation value and uncertainty of position and momentum given a specified wavefunction.
7. Solve for the net energy release of a given nuclear reaction.
8. Demonstrate competency with complex lab instruments.
9. Differentiate between good and bad data.
10. Evaluate data using error analysis.
11. Write a hypothesis for a laboratory experiment.
12. Draw a conclusion from a laboratory experiment and rewrite a hypothesis, if necessary.

Course Offered Spring only

PHY 290 - Independent Study

Variable Credit

See the Department Chairperson.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PLE - Police: Law Enforcement
PLS - Paralegal Studies
POR - Portuguese/Foreign Language
POS - Political Science
PPE - Physical Studies/Physical Education
PSC - Public Safety Communications
PSC - Public Safety Training
PST - Public Safety Training
PSY - Psychology
REA - Reading
SBS - Honors Studies
SBS - Social & Behavioral Sciences
SCI - Science
SCR - Computer Security
SGT - Surgical Technology
SMT - Sports Management
SOC - Sociology
SPA - Spanish/Foreign Language
SPC - Speech Communication
STT - Solar Thermal Technology
SUS - Sustainability Studies
SVL - Service Learning
TAM - Tooling and Machining
TEK - Technology
THE - Theatre
TOY - Toyota
TRS - Transitional Studies
TVL - Travel And Tourism
XRT - Radiologic Technology