Course Descriptions

The following is a complete listing of courses offered at MCC. You can also visit our Programs of Study page for a list of course requirements necessary to complete your degree.

AAD - Applied Art and Design
ACC - Accounting
ACD - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency
AGS - Agricultural Studies
ANT - Anthropology
ARA - Arabic/Foreign Language
ART - Art
ASL - American Sign Language/Foreign Language
ATP - Automotive Technology
BIO - Biology
BUS - Business
CDL - Interdisciplinary
CE - Cooperative Education-Disney World
CE - Hospitality
CE - Office Technology
CEL - Leadership
CHE - Chemistry
CHI - Chinese/Foreign Language
CIN - Cinema Studies
CIS - Computer Information Systems
CIT - Civil and Construction Technology
CLT - Clinical Laboratory Technician
COM - Communication
COS - College Success
CPT - Computer Technology
CRC - Computer Related Curricula
CRJ - Criminal Justice
CSC - Computer Science
DAS - Dental Assisting
DEN - Dental Hygiene
EBL - Experience Based Learning
ECE - Education and Early Care
ECO - Economics
EDU - Education
ELT - Electrical Engineering Technology/Electronics
EMS - Emergency Medical Services
ENG - English Literature
ENG - English Writing
ENR - Engineering Science
ESL - English For Speakers Of Other Languages (ESOL)
FPT - Fire Protection Technology
FRE - French/Foreign Language
FSA - Food Service Administration
GEG - Geography
GEO - Geology
GER - German/Foreign Language
GLF - Golf Management
HBR - Hebrew/Foreign Language
HED - Health Education
HEG - Health Education Global
HIM - Health Information Technology
HIS - History
HMN - Humanities
HON - Honors Studies
HPR - Health Professions
HSM - Homeland Security Administration
HSP - Hospitality
HTL - Hotel Technology
HUM - Human Services
HVA - Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning
IDE - Interior Design
ITA - Italian/Foreign Language
JPN - Japanese/Foreign Language
LAW - Law
LDS - Leadership
MAR - Marketing
MET - Mechanical Technology
MFG - Manufacturing Technology: Automation / Robotics
MTH - Mathematics
MUS - Music
NUR - Nursing
OFT - Office Technology
OPT - Optical Systems Technology
PE - Physical Education--Coed
PEC - Physical Education--Coed
PEJ - Physical Education-Criminal Justice
PEM - Physical Education--Men
PEW - Physical Education-Women
PHL - Philosophy
PHO - Photography
PHY - Physics
PLE - Police: Law Enforcement
PLS - Paralegal Studies
POR - Portuguese/Foreign Language
POS - Political Science
POS 101 - Introduction to Political Science - WR (formerly POS 110)

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of several of the basic areas of study in the discipline of political science. This course will focus on the nature of both domestic and global politics. This includes an investigation of the impact of politics in our everyday lives; the nature and function of politics and government; modern ideologies; political participation; the branches of government; and an analysis of the global system. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify the various sub-fields of political science
2. Describe the relevance of politics in our lives
3. Explain basic theories associated with the study of politics
4. Explain basic ideologies associated with the study of politics
5. Describe the complexities of political behavior
6. Identify and describe a variety of government structures
7. Identify and describe the political process in a variety of political systems
8. Explain the various forms of political participation
9. Recognize what constitutes the essential features of the international system
10. Analyze essential issues in the international system

Course Offered Fall and Spring

POS 102 - American National Government - WR (formerly POS 120)

3 Credits

This course is a study of the American political system, its constitutional foundation, national institutions and contemporary issues. This course examines how the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, in addition to other national institutions, interact with each other and citizens. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS, SUNY-AH)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain essential concepts in Political Science and American Government.
2. Articulate the ideal of Democracy versus the practice of Democracy.
3. Describe the Constitution and its historical context.
4. Summarize the essential components of the Constitution.
5. Compare and contrast the differences and tensions between Federalism and anti-Federalism
6. Assess the effects of media and public opinion on political processes.
7. Articulate the role of the U.S. government in fostering and affecting international relations.
8. Explain the impacts of social movements on American government.
9. Identify the relationship between American government and public policy outputs.
10. Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis, or evaluation of material covered in this course.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

POS 203 - Civil Liberties and Rights in the U.S. - WR (formerly POS 230)

3 Credits

An examination of controversial issues in Constitutional history. This includes a focus on the decision making process of the federal court system with regards to the civil liberties and rights enumerated in the Constitution. Students will read landmark Supreme Court cases which determine both the limits and content of government powers and vital personal freedoms. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain the structure of the U.S. Supreme Court within the context of the Constitution
2. Explain the process of the U.S. Supreme Court within the context of the Constitution
3. Describe and explain the content of rulings of the Supreme Court in areas of public policy
4. Assess the principles of legal interpretation that shape the Supreme Court’s analysis of major public policy issues
5. Evaluate the impact of the Supreme Court’s rulings on the American government and society
6. Explain the role of the Supreme Court and its decisions relating to international issues
7. Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis, or evaluation of material covered in this course.

Course Offered Fall only

POS 205 - Comparative Political Systems - WR (formerly POS 225)

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of analytical concepts and tools used in the study of a variety of political systems. This includes the descriptive and analytical examination of political systems generally classified as democratic, non-democratic, or undergoing transition. Particular attention is paid to government institutions and political processes, current leadership, and major public policy of those selected systems under review. Three class hours. (SUNY-OWC)

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Describe the important terms and concepts associated with the study of comparative political systems.
2.Relate terms and concepts associated with the academic study of comparative political systems.
3.Compare and contrast the institutions integral to the study of comparative political systems.
4.Distinguish between the history of political cultures and government institutions of Western countries.
5.Distinguish between the history of political cultures and government institutions of non-Western countries.
6.Compare and contrast the foundations of legitimacy on which political regimes rest, such as the norms and rules of ordered society; different forms of citizen participation; group behavior; or institutional activities in Western countries.
7.Compare and contrast the foundations of legitimacy on which political regimes rest, such as the norms and rules of ordered society; different forms of citizen participation; group behavior; or institutional activities in non-Western countries.
8.Explain the history of socio-economic forces with the evolution of various types of political systems in Western countries.
9.Explain the history of socio-economic forces with the evolution of various types of political systems in non-Western countries.
10.Compare and contrast selected public policy issues of countries with different government structures in both Western and non-Western countries.
11.Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis, or evaluation of material covered in the course.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

POS 206 - International Politics - WR (formerly POS 220)

3 Credits

This course critically analyzes the structure and principles of the global system. The objective of this course is to give students a fundamental understanding of contemporary international affairs through a systematic examination of those theories, concepts, and events that directly relate to the global system. Topics relating to both state and human security will be addressed. This includes war and peace, terrorism, foreign policy-making, nationalism, and those areas of security relating to the environment, health, and economy. The important function of international law and organizations, and the international political economy will also be introduced. Emphasis will be placed on the role of state and non-state actors, as well as an analysis of both important historical and current events. Three class hours. (SUNY-OWC)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe the important terms and concepts associated with the study of international relations
2. Identify and explain the important current developments in international relations
3. Compare and contrast theories associated with the academic study of international relations
4. Describe the institutions associated with the study of international relations
5. Appraise the diversity and complexities of the international system
6. Show how major global events have impacted the evolution of the international system
7. Examine the impact of globalization on the interaction of state and non-state actors in the international system
8. Identify and describe the major issues and problems associated with the international system
9. Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis, or evaluation of material covered in this course.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

POS 210 - Introduction to Political Thought - WR

3 Credits

This course offers a survey of western political thought from classical Greece to the present. This course pays attention to the historical context out of which the political thought of Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke and others arose. Through the examination of the development of political thought, this course will grow an understanding of the nature and foundations of modern governments. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS)

Course Learning Outcomes
1.State the social, economic, or political issues that philosophers face.
2.Describe the methods philosophers use to address social, economic, or political issues.
3.Compare and contrast the influence of various political philosophies on society, economy or politics in an historical and modern context.
4.Explain how political philosophies have evolved over time.
5.Explain why political philosophies have evolved over time.
6.Analyze how philosophy is used to develop a personal political belief structure.
7.Relate various philosophies to an understanding of the global system.
8.Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis, or evaluation of material covered in the course.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

POS 216 - Special Topics in Political Science -WR

3 Credits

This course is designed to address specific topics of interest in political science. Offerings are more specific and focused than the introductory surveys. Examples of potential offerings could include The American Presidency, Comparative Public Policy, American National Security, and Urban Politics in a Comparative Perspective. Topics may change from semester to semester based on faculty and student interest. The classes will be primarily lecture and discussion based. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain political events or phenomena within the framework of political science.
2. Analyze theories or concepts used in political science regarding political events or phenomena.
3. Assess the limits on the power of government or people in domestic or international contexts.
4. Compare the historical or social influences on political events or phenomena.
5. Describe policy alternatives to current political institutions.
6. Explain the organization and development of varying political systems or patterns of governance.
7. Assess the influences and processes in which the United States constructs foreign or national security policy.
8. Synthesize theoretical, empirical, or analytical understandings of political events or phenomena.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

POS 234 - Model United Nations - WR

4 Credits

This course offers opportunities for academic, career and personal growth for those interested in international affairs and the political arena. Students will work together researching the history, culture and relevant domestic issues of the assigned country, and will learn about one of the most important international organizations in the world: the United Nations. In the process, this class will provide students with the knowledge and leadership skills (i.e., negotiating, team building, public speaking, etc.) to prepare students as delegates to the Model United Nations Conference. In contrast to standard lecture courses, students will be actively involved in team directed preparation and content delivery. Attendance at the Model United Nations Conference is mandatory. Two class hours, two conference hours.

Prerequisite: Registration in this course is by permission only, following an application and selection process that takes place in the Fall Semester.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify and describe the historic and current role of the United Nations in the international system
2. Explain the process of politics between national and international organizations
3. Analyze the problems and potential solutions faced by the United Nations
4. Complete an intensive study of a selected country’s actual participation in the United Nations
5. Develop leadership and diplomatic skills such as problem solving; negotiating; analysis; critical thinking
6. Utilize a variety of skill sets such as research; writing; speaking; teambuilding
7. Formulate an appreciation of diversity and inclusion
8. Apply skills learned toward participation at an international Model United Nations held in New York City

Course Offered Spring only

POS 290 - Independent Study - WR

Variable Credit

See the Department Chairperson.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PPE - Physical Studies/Physical Education
PSC - Public Safety Communications
PSC - Public Safety Training
PST - Public Safety Training
PSY - Psychology
REA - Reading
SBS - Honors Studies
SBS - Social & Behavioral Sciences
SCI - Science
SCR - Computer Security
SGT - Surgical Technology
SMT - Sports Management
SOC - Sociology
SPA - Spanish/Foreign Language
SPC - Speech Communication
STT - Solar Thermal Technology
SUS - Sustainability Studies
SVL - Service Learning
TAM - Tooling and Machining
TEK - Technology
THE - Theatre
TOY - Toyota
TRS - Transitional Studies
TVL - Travel And Tourism
XRT - Radiologic Technology