Course Descriptions

The following is a complete listing of courses offered at MCC. You can also visit our Programs of Study page for a list of course requirements necessary to complete your degree.

AAD - Applied Art and Design
ACC - Accounting
ACD - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency
AGS - Agricultural Studies
ANT - Anthropology
ARA - Arabic/Foreign Language
ART - Art
ASL - American Sign Language/Foreign Language
ATP - Automotive Technology
BIO - Biology
BUS - Business
CDL - Interdisciplinary
CE - Cooperative Education-Disney World
CE - Hospitality
CE - Office Technology
CEL - Leadership
CHE - Chemistry
CHI - Chinese/Foreign Language
CIN - Cinema Studies
CIS - Computer Information Systems
CIT - Civil and Construction Technology
CLT - Clinical Laboratory Technician
COM - Communication
COS - College Success
CPT - Computer Technology
CRC - Computer Related Curricula
CRJ - Criminal Justice
CSC - Computer Science
DAS - Dental Assisting
DEN - Dental Hygiene
EBL - Experience Based Learning
ECE - Education and Early Care
ECO - Economics
EDU - Education
ELT - Electrical Engineering Technology/Electronics
EMS - Emergency Medical Services
ENG - English Literature
ENG - English Writing
ENR - Engineering Science
ESL - English For Speakers Of Other Languages (ESOL)
FPT - Fire Protection Technology
FRE - French/Foreign Language
FSA - Food Service Administration
GEG - Geography
GEO - Geology
GER - German/Foreign Language
GLF - Golf Management
HBR - Hebrew/Foreign Language
HED - Health Education
HEG - Health Education Global
HIM - Health Information Technology
HIS - History
HMN - Humanities
HON - Honors Studies
HPR - Health Professions
HSM - Homeland Security Administration
HSP - Hospitality
HTL - Hotel Technology
HUM - Human Services
HVA - Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning
IDE - Interior Design
ITA - Italian/Foreign Language
JPN - Japanese/Foreign Language
LAW - Law
LDS - Leadership
MAR - Marketing
MET - Mechanical Technology
MFG - Manufacturing Technology: Automation / Robotics
MTH - Mathematics
MUS - Music
NUR - Nursing
OFT - Office Technology
OPT - Optical Systems Technology
PE - Physical Education--Coed
PEC - Physical Education--Coed
PEJ - Physical Education-Criminal Justice
PEM - Physical Education--Men
PEW - Physical Education-Women
PHL - Philosophy
PHO - Photography
PHY - Physics
PLE - Police: Law Enforcement
PLS - Paralegal Studies
POR - Portuguese/Foreign Language
POS - Political Science
PPE - Physical Studies/Physical Education
PSC - Public Safety Communications
PSC - Public Safety Training
PST - Public Safety Training
PSY - Psychology
REA - Reading
SBS - Honors Studies
SBS - Social & Behavioral Sciences
SCI - Science
SCR - Computer Security
SGT - Surgical Technology
SMT - Sports Management
SOC - Sociology
SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology - WR

3 Credits

A survey of the major concepts employed in the systematic study of human relationships, with emphasis on society, culture, social interaction, socialization, groups, bureaucracy, institutions, collective behavior, social stratification, social control, social change and sociology as a field of knowledge. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS)

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Summarize the theoretical perspectives: structural-functionalism, conflict theory, symbolic interactionism, and feminism.
2.Examine the use of the scientific approach in conducting sociological research.
3.Identify and describe the components of culture.
4.Apply sociological concepts to the development of self.
5.Differentiate between the normative and sociological understanding of deviance and conformity.
6.Examine the impact of structural inequality.
7.Recognize social institutions.
8.Interpret sociological concepts with a global perspective.
9.Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis, or evaluation of material covered in this course.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

SOC 102 - Social Problems- WR

3 Credits

An analysis of major social problems in contemporary society, their nature, development and social causes. The course examines the impact of problems such as poverty, crime, drug addiction and prejudice on the individual and society. Possible solutions for social problems are discussed. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify the origins of social problems in the structure of existing social institutions.
2. Explain the central role of race as a source of division and inequality in society.
3. Explain the central role of class as a source of division and inequality in society.
4. Explain the central role of gender as a source of division and inequality in society.
5. Explain the central role of sexuality as a source of division and inequality in society.
6. Evaluate competing social scientific theories regarding the origins of social problems.
7. Analyze the role of power in the definition and labeling of social problems.
8. Critically evaluate current political discourse regarding social problems' causes and potential remedies.
9. Critically evaluate current social movement activity regarding social problems' causes and potential remedies.
10. Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis or evaluation of material covered in this course.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

SOC 201 - Sociology of Race and Ethnicity - WR

3 Credits

This course explores the relationships between majority and minority populations in the United States. We will begin to understand the concepts of race and ethnicity not as static, but as changing phenomena. What is the nature of American identity? What are the social structural causes of inequality? This course will provide a sociological perspective centered on questions of race, identity and inter-group relations. We will explore such topics as the nature of prejudice and racism, policies affecting minorities, the social construction of race and immigration to the United States. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS)

Prerequisite: SOC 101

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain the social construction of race.
2. Identify and describe the social structural causes of inequality.
3. Examine the relative status of various racial and ethnic groups.
4. Compare and contrast attitudinal and institutional discrimination.
5. Critique how meritocratic ideology justifies racial inequality in the U.S.
6. Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis or evaluation of material covered in this course.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

SOC 202 - WR - Urban Sociology

3 Credits

This course focuses on the social, political, economic, and cultural factors associated with development of urban communities, the characteristics of urban institutions, trends in urban planning, ecological processes, and the effects upon urban communities of development and migration. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS)

Prerequisite: SOC 101

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe the evolution of urban communities from a variety of theoretical perspectives.
2. Describe the evolution of social institutions from a variety of theoretical perspectives.
3. Apply theories learned to analyze past developments and their impact on the urban community.
4. Analyze the conditions that impact urban and suburban communities.
5. Evaluate the effectiveness of contemporary urban institutions in dealing with the challenges that face urban communities today.
6. Evaluate the effectiveness of social movements in dealing with the challenges that face urban communities today.
7. Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis or evaluation of material covered in this course.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

SOC 203 - Criminology-WR

3 Credits

The course emphasizes the historical and contemporary theories of crime causation. Problems involving attempts to develop a scientific and objective approach to the phenomena of crime are analyzed. Issues such as the role of law, the political and economic institutions and the social structure which generate crime are investigated. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS)

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 or SOC 102

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Apply introductory sociological concepts and theories to their learning of crime causation, deviance, victimization and the social responses to those behaviors.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of the various microlevel and macrolevel theories of crime causation.
3. Evaluate the methodologies and issues surrounding the scientific measurement of crime.
4. Analyze the role of law and the larger social structures that generate crime and other types of social inequalities within a sociological perspective.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

SOC 204 - Sociology of the Family - WR

3 Credits

A sociological analysis of the family as a social institution: its origin, structure and variations; and patterns of intimate relationships. Examines family organization and disorganization through analysis of mate selection, sexuality, gender and family roles, marriage and divorce, parenthood, and the diversity of family composition. Investigates key concerns for contemporary American families including communication and power, the balance of work and family obligations, the impact of social change, and current social policy issues. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: SOC 101

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Describe the historical social trends of family organization.
2.Describe the contemporary social trends of family organization.
3.Apply micro level sociological perspectives to learn about the family system in the U.S.
4.Apply macro level sociological perspectives to learn about the family system in the U.S.
5.Evaluate the influence of demographic variables (such as social class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation) on variations in family experience in the U.S. today.
6.Analyze cultural representations of contemporary family using sociological research and methodologies.
7.Analyze the role of society in shaping family behavior patterns using sociological research and methodologies.
8.Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis or evaluation of material covered in this course.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

SOC 205 - African-American Family - WR

3 Credits

A comprehensive examination of the diverse and complex issues surrounding the African-American family unit as it has evolved from pre-slavery to contemporary period. It focuses on historical, social, cultural, political, economic and global conditions that have affected that institution. The course discusses key issues, themes and debates in the field and analyzes a variety of theoretical perspectives of examining the African-American family life. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or SOC 102

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Outline the key issues surrounding the African-American family throughout its history.
2. Summarize the condition of the African-American family during slavery.
3. Describe the social forces that have impacted the African-American family as it has evolved in the last one and a half centuries.
4. Summarize the cultural condition of the African-American family in slavery and freedom.
5. Outline the political and economic conditions that have shaped the contemporary African-American family.
6. Recall key issues and debates in the field of African-American families.
7. Analyze the main theoretical perspectives of examining the African-American family.
8. Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis or evaluation of material covered in this course.

Course Offered Spring only

SOC 206 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality - WR

3 Credits

This course introduces students to the sociological study of gender and sexuality in contemporary U.S. society by examining the ways in which each are socially constructed. The role of gender and sexuality in institutional structures, including the economy, law, education and media will be examined. Historical and cross-cultural variations in gender and sexuality are explored as well as variations by race, ethnicity, and social class. Sociological theory and research will be used to provide analysis for systems of inequality as well as how the meanings and experiences of gender and sexuality have changed over time. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: SOC 101

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Apply sociological micro level perspectives to learn about the changing roles of females and males in the U.S.
2.Apply sociological macro level perspectives to learn about the changing roles of females and males in the U.S.
3.Describe historical social trends surrounding sex and gender.
4.Describe cross-cultural social trends surrounding sex and gender.
5.Describe contemporary social trends surrounding sex and gender.
6.Evaluate gender as a social construction which perpetuates global inequalities and stratification.
7.Analyze sociological research methodologies and data relative to the scientific study of sex and gender.
8.Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis or evaluation of material covered in this course.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

SOC 209 - Environmental Sociology - WR

3 Credits

An introduction to the key theoretical approaches and research within the emerging field of environmental sociology, and an examination of the ongoing research on how environmental problems have roots in social processes, such as culture, community, social inequality, social organization and social structure. Students will examine how human values about the environment and the relationships between humans and our physical environment are socially constructed. Students will develop a working knowledge of sociological research methods and theoretical perspectives in their analyses of the relationship between human societies and the physical environment. Course offered Fall, Spring and Summer. Three class hours.

Prerequisite: SOC 101

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Examine the development of environmental sociology as a discipline.
2.Define major concepts within environmental sociology.
3.Identify theoretical perspectives used in environmental sociology.
4.Analyze the social origins of current environmental problems.
5.Analyze the impact of environmental problems on human populations globally.
6.Apply sociological research methods to conduct new research in the discipline of environmental sociology.
7.Evaluate current environmental debates.
8.Evaluate the development of global environmental policies.
9.Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis or evaluation of material covered in this course.

SOC 210 - Global Interdependence - WR (formerly SOC 150)

3 Credits

Individuals, local communities, business enterprises, and nation-states are today inextricably involved in and affected by global relationships. This course provides an overview of the emergence and characteristics of global, social, economic, political, and ecological interdependence, particularly as these developments are affected by rapid social and technological change. In analyzing global problems, students evaluate conventional interpretations, refine analytical frameworks, and consider alternative strategies for coping with planetary issues. Students also assess their individual needs in the context of human survival and global interdependence. Three class hours. (SUNY-OWC)

Prerequisite: SOC 101.

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Explain the process of globalization.
2.Explain the historical context of the Global North and Global South.
3.Discuss global interdependence through an informed perspective of global economics.
4.Discuss global interdependence through an informed perspective of global politics.
5.Discuss global interdependence through an informed perspective of global culture.
6.Discuss global institutions that inform global interdependence.
7.Analyze a specific global interdependent relationship between two countries or two global regions based on historical or current research.
8.Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis or evaluation of material covered in this course.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

SOC 211 - Sociology of Work - WR

3 Credits

This course applies sociological research to a study of what it means to be a worker and how work has evolved historically. This course also investigates the impact of structural inequality on workers as it relates to race, age, gender and the institution of the family. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS)

Prerequisite: SOC 101

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Examine the use of the scientific approach in conducting sociological research.
2. Apply sociological research to a study of what it means to be a worker.
3. Examine how work has evolved historically.
4. Investigate the impact of structural inequality on workers as it relates to race.
5. Research the impact of structural inequality on workers as it relates to age.
6. Investigate the impact of structural inequality on workers as it relates to gender.
7. Analyze the impact of structural inequality on workers as it relates to the social institution of the family.
8. Utilize writing to communicate an understanding, application, analysis or evaluation of material covered in this course.

Course Offered Spring only

SOC 216 - Special Topics in Sociology - WR

3 Credits

This course is designed to address specific topics of interest in sociology. Offerings are more specific and focused than the introductory surveys. Examples of potential offerings could include Sociology of the Body, Sociology of Deviance, or Sociology of Pop Culture. Topics may change from semester to semester based on faculty and student interest. The classes will be primarily lecture and discussion based. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe and explain the social phenomenon within a cultural and structural context.
2. Analyze different theories and perspectives regarding the social phenomenon.
3. Investigate the limits and supports placed on purposeful action by social processes, institutions, and practices.
4. Compare how the phenomenon is socially constructed globally, situationally,and historically.
5. Create typologies from the components of the social phenomenon being studied.
6. Critique faulty mainstream assumptions and hegemonically constructed beliefs about the social phenomenon.
7. Explain how individual understandings of the topic help to create societal reality as well as how institutional definitions of the topic help to influence individual understandings using the sociological imagination.
8. Demonstrate critical thinking skills by synthesizing theoretical, empirical, and analytical understandings of the social phenomenon.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

SOC 290 - Independent Study - WR

Variable Credit

See the Department Chairperson.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

SPA - Spanish/Foreign Language
SPC - Speech Communication
STT - Solar Thermal Technology
SUS - Sustainability Studies
SVL - Service Learning
TAM - Tooling and Machining
TEK - Technology
THE - Theatre
TOY - Toyota
TRS - Transitional Studies
TVL - Travel And Tourism
XRT - Radiologic Technology