<p>In order to help maintain mental health, it is recommended that people should be cognizant of the mind-body connection. To help maintain one's overall wellbeing, the following is suggested:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Exercise</strong> regularly. Regular exercise can release the body's chemicals like endorphins. These "feel good" brain chemicals enhance one's thoughts and feelings.</li>
<li><strong>Eat a healthy diet</strong>. Avoid diets that are loaded with processed, high-calorie foods.</li>
<li><strong> Social support</strong>. An individual's social support network is important in preventing a decline in one's sense of wellbeing. The growing field of epigenetics continues to make it clear that stressful and depressing environments (e.g. poverty) can alter the way genes behave in triggering mental health issues. Recent studies have indicated that our mental health is impacted not only by our food intake but also by food insecurities.</li>
<li><strong>Sleep</strong>. One should get adequate rest/sleep to repair and rejuvenate one's biopsychosocial self.</li>
<li><strong>Alcohol Consumption</strong>-The intake of alcoholic beverages should be in moderation. Research indicates alcohol can cause or exacerbate mental health difficulties. Its impacts the production of brain chemicals such as Serotonin. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that relays signals from one area of the brain to another. It affects mood, sexual functions, appetite, memory, body temperature regulation, learning, some social behaviors, etc.</li>
</ul>
<p>National, state, and local data paint the same picture of student mental health. The latest data from a study conducted by the University of California at Berkeley indicates anxiety disorders among 18 to 24-year-olds since 2008 has doubled. The report by the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCD) indicated that the top four presenting issues in counseling students are:</p>
<ol>
<li>Anxiety</li>
<li>Stress</li>
<li>Depression</li>
<li>Suicidal Ideation</li>
</ol>
<p>These findings mirror MCC's Counseling Center data. Additionally, all higher education surveys, studies, and reports indicate that request for counseling services continues to increase all institutions. MCC data indicates that requests for counseling services have increased by approximately 60% over the last academic year.</p>
<p>MCC will have a number of events during the month of May focused on mental health:</p>
<ul>
<li>Mental Health First Aid Training-facilitated by Counselor Michael Johnson and Title IX Director Shannon Glasgow (May 28th and 29th, from 9 am to 2 pm at the Downtown Campus). For more information, contact Shannon Glasgow at sglasgow@monroecc.edu.</li>
<li>Mental health screenings ,Wednesdays 11 am to 2 pm, at the Brighton Counseling Center.</li>
<li>Meditation - May 3, 6,8,10 13 (9-152 facilitated by Donna Burke) for more information contact Donna Burke at dburke@monroecc.edu.</li>
<li>Visit by the Coordinator of the Rochester Community Mobile Crisis Team (a countywide psychiatric emergency department on wheels), Keenan Steverson at the Brighton Campus-Wednesday May 15th-1 pm to 3 pm, table by the Counseling and Disability Services Center.</li>
<li>Visit by Genesee Mental Health Treatment Center therapists, Bill Pierson, at the Brighton Campus-Tuesday-May 21st(10 to 12 pm) table by the Counseling and Disability Services Center.</li>
<li>Visit by the Evelyn Brandon Center Mental Health Treatment Center's Clinical Director, Jamie Watt, at the Brighton Campus-Monday May 20th, 2 to 3:30 pm table by the Counseling and Disability Services Center.</li>
<li>Healthy Eating Habits tabling event, May 17th, 12 pm to 1:30 pm, at the Brighton Campus Counseling Center, facilitated by Jessica Kouzan of the Cornell Cooperative Ext. table by the Counseling and Disability Services Center.</li>
<li>Open AA meetings-every Wednesday 12:05 to 12:50 pm-Bldg. 9A, room 117.</li>
</ul>

MCC Daily Tribune

May is Mental Health Awareness Month

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. Mental health awareness is represented by wearing a green ribbon. Mental Health Awareness Month was established in 1949 to raise awareness of the importance of mental health and wellness in general.

In order to help maintain mental health, it is recommended that people should be cognizant of the mind-body connection. To help maintain one's overall wellbeing, the following is suggested:

  • Exercise regularly. Regular exercise can release the body's chemicals like endorphins. These "feel good" brain chemicals enhance one's thoughts and feelings.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Avoid diets that are loaded with processed, high-calorie foods.
  • Social support. An individual's social support network is important in preventing a decline in one's sense of wellbeing. The growing field of epigenetics continues to make it clear that stressful and depressing environments (e.g. poverty) can alter the way genes behave in triggering mental health issues. Recent studies have indicated that our mental health is impacted not only by our food intake but also by food insecurities.
  • Sleep. One should get adequate rest/sleep to repair and rejuvenate one's biopsychosocial self.
  • Alcohol Consumption-The intake of alcoholic beverages should be in moderation. Research indicates alcohol can cause or exacerbate mental health difficulties. Its impacts the production of brain chemicals such as Serotonin. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that relays signals from one area of the brain to another. It affects mood, sexual functions, appetite, memory, body temperature regulation, learning, some social behaviors, etc.

National, state, and local data paint the same picture of student mental health. The latest data from a study conducted by the University of California at Berkeley indicates anxiety disorders among 18 to 24-year-olds since 2008 has doubled. The report by the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors (AUCCCD) indicated that the top four presenting issues in counseling students are:

  1. Anxiety
  2. Stress
  3. Depression
  4. Suicidal Ideation

These findings mirror MCC's Counseling Center data. Additionally, all higher education surveys, studies, and reports indicate that request for counseling services continues to increase all institutions. MCC data indicates that requests for counseling services have increased by approximately 60% over the last academic year.

MCC will have a number of events during the month of May focused on mental health:

  • Mental Health First Aid Training-facilitated by Counselor Michael Johnson and Title IX Director Shannon Glasgow (May 28th and 29th, from 9 am to 2 pm at the Downtown Campus). For more information, contact Shannon Glasgow at sglasgow@monroecc.edu.
  • Mental health screenings ,Wednesdays 11 am to 2 pm, at the Brighton Counseling Center.
  • Meditation - May 3, 6,8,10 13 (9-152 facilitated by Donna Burke) for more information contact Donna Burke at dburke@monroecc.edu.
  • Visit by the Coordinator of the Rochester Community Mobile Crisis Team (a countywide psychiatric emergency department on wheels), Keenan Steverson at the Brighton Campus-Wednesday May 15th-1 pm to 3 pm, table by the Counseling and Disability Services Center.
  • Visit by Genesee Mental Health Treatment Center therapists, Bill Pierson, at the Brighton Campus-Tuesday-May 21st(10 to 12 pm) table by the Counseling and Disability Services Center.
  • Visit by the Evelyn Brandon Center Mental Health Treatment Center's Clinical Director, Jamie Watt, at the Brighton Campus-Monday May 20th, 2 to 3:30 pm table by the Counseling and Disability Services Center.
  • Healthy Eating Habits tabling event, May 17th, 12 pm to 1:30 pm, at the Brighton Campus Counseling Center, facilitated by Jessica Kouzan of the Cornell Cooperative Ext. table by the Counseling and Disability Services Center.
  • Open AA meetings-every Wednesday 12:05 to 12:50 pm-Bldg. 9A, room 117.

Watkins, E.
Counseling Center & Disability Services
05/13/2019