<p><strong>Marisol Galarza-Ruiz: Friday, February 7, 12-12:50 p.m. in 8-200</strong></p>
<p><strong><br /></strong>Professor Marisol Galarza-Ruiz (World Languages and Cultures) teaches Spanish at Monroe Community College, where she also serves as faculty advisor to the Downtown Spanish Club. A long-time volunteer with several organizations serving the Latino community, Professor Galarza-Ruiz became a 2019 Community College Internationalization Fellow from Cornell University's Latin American Studies Program. For her Filling Station presentation, Galarza-Ruiz will discuss her views and experiences surrounding relief efforts in Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in 2017. As Galarza-Ruiz notes, "Over 3 million Americans who live on the island of Puerto Rico face a lingering economic crisis, government bankruptcy, and a recent major political scandal." Under Galarza-Ruiz's leadership, MCC participated in the NY stands with Puerto Rico Recovery and Rebuilding Initiative, which is an ongoing collaboration between the NY state governor's office, SUNY, and UNICEF. "They pledge to send 500 students and staff from SUNY to help in the reconstruction of Puerto Rico," says Galarza-Ruiz. She adds: "MCC was the only community college to lead a group in 2018 and had the opportunity again in 2019 to lead another group."</p>
<p>​<strong>Jonathon Little: Friday, March 6, 12-12:50 p.m. in 8-200<br /></strong></p>
<p>Jonathon Little is an Associate Professor of Geography at MCC where he teaches a number of Physical Geography and Geospatial Technology courses. He coordinates the Geospatial Information Science &amp; Technology (GIST) Certificate and is the Principal Investigator (PI) of a SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grant to develop remote workforce opportunities and a virtual desktop. He was the PI for a National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education grant to develop a GIST Certificate program and create a workforce pipeline between high schools and the college. He is a Board Member of a local GIS organization and the New York Geographic Alliance, serves on the NY state GIS Education committee, and is the National Geographic New York State Steward. He traveled to Kazakhstan as a Fulbright Specialist June of 2019 where he trained faculty on remote sensing. For his Filling Station presentation, Little says he will "share his experience in Kazakhstan and will discuss other global-based initiatives." Moreover, he will be "implementing remote workforce opportunities for Geospatial Information Science &amp; Technology (GIST) and Geography students in Colombia, Kazakhstan, and Costa Rica spring of 2020."</p>
<p><strong>Mike Jacobs: Friday, April 17, 12-12:50 p.m. in 8-200<br /></strong></p>
<p>Dr. Michael Jacobs is Dean, Humanities and Social Sciences at MCC and Executive Deputy Director of the Community College Humanities Association. Before becoming an administrator, he taught literature, writing, and film at Berkeley College in New York City (where he served as English Department Chair) and New York University. His research and scholarship largely focus on modernist documentary literature. For Filling Station Jacobs will deliver a presentation called "What's Old is New Again: Radical Journalism in 20th Century America." In his own words: "In the 1960s and 70s, a new breed of journalist rose to prominence in the United States. Dubbed the "New Journalists," these writers' inventive, often subversive and irreverent approach to both representing reality and communicating the humanity of their subjects infused their work with a range of literary devices; consequently, their writing often reads more like fiction than journalism. This presentation explores seminal works of New Journalism from writers such as Norman Mailer, Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Hunter S. Thompson, and Tom Wolfe, as well as the sociopolitical and cultural conditions that gave rise to the form. It also challenges the idea that the New Journalism was completely new by examining its origins within an established tradition of literary nonfiction developed during the Great Depression--a tradition that had somehow been forgotten in a single generation."</p>

MCC Daily Tribune

Save the Dates for Filling Station's Spring 2020 Season

Filling Station: A Faculty Research Presentation Series
Spring 2020 Lineup

Marisol Galarza-Ruiz: Friday, February 7, 12-12:50 p.m. in 8-200


Professor Marisol Galarza-Ruiz (World Languages and Cultures) teaches Spanish at Monroe Community College, where she also serves as faculty advisor to the Downtown Spanish Club. A long-time volunteer with several organizations serving the Latino community, Professor Galarza-Ruiz became a 2019 Community College Internationalization Fellow from Cornell University's Latin American Studies Program. For her Filling Station presentation, Galarza-Ruiz will discuss her views and experiences surrounding relief efforts in Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in 2017. As Galarza-Ruiz notes, "Over 3 million Americans who live on the island of Puerto Rico face a lingering economic crisis, government bankruptcy, and a recent major political scandal." Under Galarza-Ruiz's leadership, MCC participated in the NY stands with Puerto Rico Recovery and Rebuilding Initiative, which is an ongoing collaboration between the NY state governor's office, SUNY, and UNICEF. "They pledge to send 500 students and staff from SUNY to help in the reconstruction of Puerto Rico," says Galarza-Ruiz. She adds: "MCC was the only community college to lead a group in 2018 and had the opportunity again in 2019 to lead another group."

Jonathon Little: Friday, March 6, 12-12:50 p.m. in 8-200

Jonathon Little is an Associate Professor of Geography at MCC where he teaches a number of Physical Geography and Geospatial Technology courses. He coordinates the Geospatial Information Science & Technology (GIST) Certificate and is the Principal Investigator (PI) of a SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grant to develop remote workforce opportunities and a virtual desktop. He was the PI for a National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education grant to develop a GIST Certificate program and create a workforce pipeline between high schools and the college. He is a Board Member of a local GIS organization and the New York Geographic Alliance, serves on the NY state GIS Education committee, and is the National Geographic New York State Steward. He traveled to Kazakhstan as a Fulbright Specialist June of 2019 where he trained faculty on remote sensing. For his Filling Station presentation, Little says he will "share his experience in Kazakhstan and will discuss other global-based initiatives." Moreover, he will be "implementing remote workforce opportunities for Geospatial Information Science & Technology (GIST) and Geography students in Colombia, Kazakhstan, and Costa Rica spring of 2020."

Mike Jacobs: Friday, April 17, 12-12:50 p.m. in 8-200

Dr. Michael Jacobs is Dean, Humanities and Social Sciences at MCC and Executive Deputy Director of the Community College Humanities Association. Before becoming an administrator, he taught literature, writing, and film at Berkeley College in New York City (where he served as English Department Chair) and New York University. His research and scholarship largely focus on modernist documentary literature. For Filling Station Jacobs will deliver a presentation called "What's Old is New Again: Radical Journalism in 20th Century America." In his own words: "In the 1960s and 70s, a new breed of journalist rose to prominence in the United States. Dubbed the "New Journalists," these writers' inventive, often subversive and irreverent approach to both representing reality and communicating the humanity of their subjects infused their work with a range of literary devices; consequently, their writing often reads more like fiction than journalism. This presentation explores seminal works of New Journalism from writers such as Norman Mailer, Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Hunter S. Thompson, and Tom Wolfe, as well as the sociopolitical and cultural conditions that gave rise to the form. It also challenges the idea that the New Journalism was completely new by examining its origins within an established tradition of literary nonfiction developed during the Great Depression--a tradition that had somehow been forgotten in a single generation."

Leuzzi, Anthony
English/Philosophy
12/06/2019