Skip to main content

<p>As you may know, eating disorders are serious, life-threatening illnesses in which people &ndash; of any size, shape, race, gender identity, and age &ndash; experience a preoccupation with food, weight, and body shape.</p>

<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/get-involved/nedawareness">28.8 million Americans struggle with an eating disorder</a>, and they are the second most deadly mental illness.</li>
<li>Contrary to popular opinion, <a href="https://anad.org/eating-disorders-statistics/">less than 6% of those diagnosed are underweight</a>, and therefore eating disorders are often invisible conditions.</li>
</ul>

<p>This year, for <strong>#NEDAwareness Week</strong>, we were all invited to <strong><em>See the Change, Be the Change</em></strong><em>. </em>The annual campaign seeks to educate the public about the realities of eating disorders and provide hope and support to those who are suffering. We can all work to talk more about body positivity. Body positivity is a term that&rsquo;s used often in popular culture, but perhaps you are wondering what it means and how you can get involved in spreading the message.</p>

<p><strong><a href="https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-body-positivity-4773402">What body positivity means:</a> </strong></p>

<ul>
<li>All people deserve to have a positive body image, no matter their size, shape, appearance, or what messages society sends about what is &ldquo;beautiful&rdquo; or &ldquo;ideal.&rdquo;</li>
<li>Challenging how society views the body.</li>
<li>Addressing unrealistic body/beauty standards.</li>
<li>Promoting acceptance of all bodies.</li>
<li>Helping people build confidence and acceptance of their own body.</li>
</ul>

<p><strong>Some steps to consider taking:</strong></p>

<ul>
<li>Replace negative self-talk about your body with more neutral statements or gratitude about all the positive things your body can do for you (for example: taste your favorite food, smell freshly baked cookies, play your favorite game, and hug your loved ones).</li>
<li>Disrupt other people&rsquo;s negative self-talk: if you hear a friend say something negative about themselves, gently challenge it and encourage them to understand that their physical appearance is not what defines them.</li>
<li>Look for the beauty in strangers: let go of any potential judgement and/or negativity while scrolling through social media or people-watching out in public. Acknowledge every person has something that makes them beautiful. If you&rsquo;re feeling up for it, tell them! Most people appreciate a sincere compliment.</li>
<li>Even if you don&rsquo;t have a positive view of your own body, work to embrace the fact that this is the body you have and think of how you can care for it so it continues to do the things you love to do: eat balanced meals because it makes you feel energized, move your body in a way that feels good and fun to you etc.</li>
<li>Identify your values and what makes your life feel purposeful: how can accepting and caring for your body help you create the life you&rsquo;ve dreamed of in accordance with your values? What people and energy do you surround yourself with to inspire you to achieve that life?</li>
</ul>

<p>If you or someone you know are struggling with eating disordered behaviors or body image concerns, reaching out to the NEDA Helpline can get you connected with a compassionate support person who will listen nonjudgmentally and if needed, connect you to additional resources:</p>

<p><strong>Online Chat</strong>: myneda.org/helpline</p>

<p><strong>Call or Text</strong>: (800)- 931-2237</p>

<p><strong>Crisis Text Line</strong>: Text &ldquo;NEDA&rdquo; to 741741</p>

<p>With warm regards,</p>

<p>Your Counseling Center &amp; Disability Services Team</p>

<p>Phone: (585) 292-2140</p>

<p>Email: <a href="mailto:counselingservices@monroecc.edu">counselingservices@monroecc.edu</a> &amp; <a href="mailto:disabilityservices@monroecc.edu">disabilityservices@monroecc.edu</a></p>

MCC Daily Tribune

National Eating Disorders Awareness

This past week, February 21-27, was National Eating Disorders Awareness Week and it is our hope to highlight this important topic by sharing the below facts and tips with our college community.

As you may know, eating disorders are serious, life-threatening illnesses in which people – of any size, shape, race, gender identity, and age – experience a preoccupation with food, weight, and body shape.

This year, for #NEDAwareness Week, we were all invited to See the Change, Be the Change. The annual campaign seeks to educate the public about the realities of eating disorders and provide hope and support to those who are suffering. We can all work to talk more about body positivity. Body positivity is a term that’s used often in popular culture, but perhaps you are wondering what it means and how you can get involved in spreading the message.

What body positivity means:

  • All people deserve to have a positive body image, no matter their size, shape, appearance, or what messages society sends about what is “beautiful” or “ideal.”
  • Challenging how society views the body.
  • Addressing unrealistic body/beauty standards.
  • Promoting acceptance of all bodies.
  • Helping people build confidence and acceptance of their own body.

Some steps to consider taking:

  • Replace negative self-talk about your body with more neutral statements or gratitude about all the positive things your body can do for you (for example: taste your favorite food, smell freshly baked cookies, play your favorite game, and hug your loved ones).
  • Disrupt other people’s negative self-talk: if you hear a friend say something negative about themselves, gently challenge it and encourage them to understand that their physical appearance is not what defines them.
  • Look for the beauty in strangers: let go of any potential judgement and/or negativity while scrolling through social media or people-watching out in public. Acknowledge every person has something that makes them beautiful. If you’re feeling up for it, tell them! Most people appreciate a sincere compliment.
  • Even if you don’t have a positive view of your own body, work to embrace the fact that this is the body you have and think of how you can care for it so it continues to do the things you love to do: eat balanced meals because it makes you feel energized, move your body in a way that feels good and fun to you etc.
  • Identify your values and what makes your life feel purposeful: how can accepting and caring for your body help you create the life you’ve dreamed of in accordance with your values? What people and energy do you surround yourself with to inspire you to achieve that life?

If you or someone you know are struggling with eating disordered behaviors or body image concerns, reaching out to the NEDA Helpline can get you connected with a compassionate support person who will listen nonjudgmentally and if needed, connect you to additional resources:

Online Chat: myneda.org/helpline

Call or Text: (800)- 931-2237

Crisis Text Line: Text “NEDA” to 741741

With warm regards,

Your Counseling Center & Disability Services Team

Phone: (585) 292-2140

Email: counselingservices@monroecc.edu & disabilityservices@monroecc.edu

Morgan Kennell
Counseling Center & Disability Services
02/28/2022