<p><em>I would like to know why CSEA employees are not permitted to work 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.<br />Students, faculty, and some service offices are open at this time. Having earlier hours will be beneficial to students, faculty and will provide additional coverage at MCC. This is a benefit to the College not a negative. I believe in giving employees flexibility when it is not detrimental to the operation of the College. Allowing employees to work earlier hours is a win-win for both the College and the employee. </em></p>
<p><em>How can people apply to have their position adjusted to 80%? At one time the college had a number of 80%'ers but we shifted away from that model - are we shifting back along with job sharing?</em></p>
<p><em>I've heard that Student Services offices are staying open later. How are they being staffed? Are individuals being required to work additional hours?</em></p>
<p>I agree that MCC should re-examine the issue of work day flexibility--and we will. Human Resources will take the lead and begin with a review of 80% positions. Specifically, I've asked for a report that identifies the following: why MCC eliminated these positions; SUNY community colleges with 80% positions and their impact on these institutions; and areas of MCC in which the restoration of 80% positions might be possible. Following this report, HR will review work day time-shifting, then job sharing.</p>
<p>Some of these options may be easier to implement or re-implement than others. The College's ability to provide flexibility in the work day is first and foremost dependent upon its impact on serving our students. We also must consider the impact on the work load of other employees, the need to provide fair opportunity for access to work day flexibility to all interested employees in an office area, and the ramifications of such flexibility on any contractual bargaining agreements.</p>
<p>The Student Services example offers insight into how MCC currently shifts work hours to meet demonstrated student demand. In this case, evening students asked for longer, later hours in service offices. The division created a process: first, ask for volunteers who wish to time-shift their schedule (arrive later, leave later); second, if volunteers do not emerge, use existing part-time funds to hire staff to cover these hours.</p>
<p>----</p>
<p><em>Employees and students continue to smoke just outside the doors to our campuses. It violates posted policy and the smell of cigarettes fills the entry ways and stairwells. What can MCC do to stop this behavior? </em></p>
<p>The first thing each of us can do, if comfortable, is remind individuals of MCC's <a href="https://www.monroecc.edu/fileadmin/SiteFiles/GeneralContent/depts/policy/documents/2-6tobacco-freepolicy.pdf">Tobacco-free, Smoke-free, and Vape-free Campus Policy</a>. If you are not comfortable having this conversation, contact Public Safety and indicate where you encountered the smokers. They will step up patrols and advise individuals of the policy. Vaping on campus is a growing issue; students and employees have reported peers vaping inside campus buildings. Nicotine is addictive and breaking that habit can be very difficult. The goal of the policy is to educate individuals about the negative health consequences of vaping and smoking and chewing tobacco. Employees seeking assistance with smoking cessation or nicotine addiction should contact Human Resources and students should contact Health Services. While our focus is on education, it is important to remember that violating any policy could result in disciplinary consequences.</p>
<p>----</p>
<p><em>I just completed Cybersecurity Training. Why do I have to do it again? This is [you can fill in the blank].</em></p>
<p><em>I'm an adjunct. Last time I did the training, I was paid. I shouldn't have to take this training on my own time and dime.</em></p>
<p>Each employee needs to complete the College's cybersecurity training annually. Because some individuals did not complete last year's training until late summer, they may, indeed, have "just completed it" when asked to take it again.</p>
<p>Cybersecurity training takes about 45 minutes, truly does offer valuable information, and is updated each year. Employees across the College reported that the training stopped them from falling for phishing emails, clicking on faked links, and downloading virus-laden attachments. Cybersecurity concerns top the lists of risks for both SUNY and MCC--for good reason. Each day, cyberattacks become more sophisticated. Already this year, such attacks at both SUNY and MCC have disrupted office operations and online services. Our computer network is now as much a part of our College infrastructure as our classrooms and offices. We all have a responsibility to safeguard it: completing the required training helps assure its safety.</p>
<p>Adjuncts will be compensated for completing cybersecurity training. But, this training is just one item on a growing list of workplace educational requirements associated with state and federal laws and MCC initiatives. Human Resources is contacting offices across campus to identify training that impacts our adjuncts. This list already includes the much-discussed cybersecurity training, as well as education related to Title IX, the Clery Act, Graham-Leach-Bliley Information Security provisions. The intent is to use this list to create comprehensive and compensated training opportunities for adjuncts to be offered in January and June.</p>
<p>Please share your thoughts on <a href="https://www.monroecc.edu/updates">the blog</a>.</p>
<p>If you have other questions or comments, you can submit them at any time via our <a href="https://monroe.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_emIUemOgeBJKg3X">anonymous portal. </a></p>

MCC Daily Tribune

President's Wednesday Message

Over the next two weeks, I'll be responding to more of your questions. Thank you for sharing them!

I would like to know why CSEA employees are not permitted to work 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Students, faculty, and some service offices are open at this time. Having earlier hours will be beneficial to students, faculty and will provide additional coverage at MCC. This is a benefit to the College not a negative. I believe in giving employees flexibility when it is not detrimental to the operation of the College. Allowing employees to work earlier hours is a win-win for both the College and the employee.

How can people apply to have their position adjusted to 80%? At one time the college had a number of 80%'ers but we shifted away from that model - are we shifting back along with job sharing?

I've heard that Student Services offices are staying open later. How are they being staffed? Are individuals being required to work additional hours?

I agree that MCC should re-examine the issue of work day flexibility--and we will. Human Resources will take the lead and begin with a review of 80% positions. Specifically, I've asked for a report that identifies the following: why MCC eliminated these positions; SUNY community colleges with 80% positions and their impact on these institutions; and areas of MCC in which the restoration of 80% positions might be possible. Following this report, HR will review work day time-shifting, then job sharing.

Some of these options may be easier to implement or re-implement than others. The College's ability to provide flexibility in the work day is first and foremost dependent upon its impact on serving our students. We also must consider the impact on the work load of other employees, the need to provide fair opportunity for access to work day flexibility to all interested employees in an office area, and the ramifications of such flexibility on any contractual bargaining agreements.

The Student Services example offers insight into how MCC currently shifts work hours to meet demonstrated student demand. In this case, evening students asked for longer, later hours in service offices. The division created a process: first, ask for volunteers who wish to time-shift their schedule (arrive later, leave later); second, if volunteers do not emerge, use existing part-time funds to hire staff to cover these hours.

----

Employees and students continue to smoke just outside the doors to our campuses. It violates posted policy and the smell of cigarettes fills the entry ways and stairwells. What can MCC do to stop this behavior?

The first thing each of us can do, if comfortable, is remind individuals of MCC's Tobacco-free, Smoke-free, and Vape-free Campus Policy. If you are not comfortable having this conversation, contact Public Safety and indicate where you encountered the smokers. They will step up patrols and advise individuals of the policy. Vaping on campus is a growing issue; students and employees have reported peers vaping inside campus buildings. Nicotine is addictive and breaking that habit can be very difficult. The goal of the policy is to educate individuals about the negative health consequences of vaping and smoking and chewing tobacco. Employees seeking assistance with smoking cessation or nicotine addiction should contact Human Resources and students should contact Health Services. While our focus is on education, it is important to remember that violating any policy could result in disciplinary consequences.

----

I just completed Cybersecurity Training. Why do I have to do it again? This is [you can fill in the blank].

I'm an adjunct. Last time I did the training, I was paid. I shouldn't have to take this training on my own time and dime.

Each employee needs to complete the College's cybersecurity training annually. Because some individuals did not complete last year's training until late summer, they may, indeed, have "just completed it" when asked to take it again.

Cybersecurity training takes about 45 minutes, truly does offer valuable information, and is updated each year. Employees across the College reported that the training stopped them from falling for phishing emails, clicking on faked links, and downloading virus-laden attachments. Cybersecurity concerns top the lists of risks for both SUNY and MCC--for good reason. Each day, cyberattacks become more sophisticated. Already this year, such attacks at both SUNY and MCC have disrupted office operations and online services. Our computer network is now as much a part of our College infrastructure as our classrooms and offices. We all have a responsibility to safeguard it: completing the required training helps assure its safety.

Adjuncts will be compensated for completing cybersecurity training. But, this training is just one item on a growing list of workplace educational requirements associated with state and federal laws and MCC initiatives. Human Resources is contacting offices across campus to identify training that impacts our adjuncts. This list already includes the much-discussed cybersecurity training, as well as education related to Title IX, the Clery Act, Graham-Leach-Bliley Information Security provisions. The intent is to use this list to create comprehensive and compensated training opportunities for adjuncts to be offered in January and June.

Please share your thoughts on the blog.

If you have other questions or comments, you can submit them at any time via our anonymous portal.

Kress, Anne
Office of the President
10/17/2018