<p>Here are some things to consider:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Go back to the basics:</strong> It may be helpful to set a schedule for the day. Try to break up long, unstructured periods of the day. Review the daily schedule with the children to include them in the process</li>
</ul>
<p> </p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Structure the day:</strong> With the usual routines thrown off, establish new daily schedules. Break up schoolwork when possible. Older children and teens can help with schedules, but they should follow a general order, such as:</li>
</ul>
<p> </p>
<ul>
<ul>
<li>Wake-up routines, getting dressed, breakfast and some active play in the morning, followed by quiet play and snack to transition into schoolwork.</li>
<li>Lunch, chores, exercise, some online social time with friends, and then homework in the afternoon.</li>
<li>Family time &amp; reading before bed<strong>.</strong></li>
</ul>
</ul>
<p> </p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Find some time for yourself:</strong> Self-care is different for everyone, but self-care can be one minute of the day, five minutes or even an hour. Self-care does not have to cost money; it does mean taking time for yourself.</li>
</ul>
<p> </p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Make a plan for staying home:</strong> Use helpful reminders to prompt children to complete tasks. Set the children up with an activity when you sit down to work on a homework assignment or test.</li>
</ul>
<p> </p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Go easy on yourself:</strong> Find comfort knowing that other parents may be facing similar challenges.</li>
</ul>
<p> </p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Complete activities together:</strong> Remember that you and the children benefit from good sleep, nutrition and exercise each day. Try going for a walk or doing a fun activity at together home.</li>
</ul>
<p> </p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Special Time In: </strong>Even with everyone home together 24/7, set aside some special time with each child. You select the time, and let your child choose the activity. Just 10 or 20 minutes of your undivided attention, even if only once every few days, will mean a lot to your child. Keep cell phones off or on silent so you don't get distracted. ​</li>
</ul>
<p> </p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Take care of yourself: </strong>Caregivers also should be sure to take time to exercise, eat healthy, get enough sleep. Give yourself time to decompress and take short breaks. If more than one parent is home, take turns watching the children if possible.</li>
</ul>
<p> </p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Remember to take a breath:</strong><strong> </strong>In addition to reaching out to others for help, the AAP recommends parents feeling overwhelmed or especially stressed to try to take just a few seconds to ask themselves:</li>
</ul>
<p><em>Does the problem represent an immediate danger? </em></p>
<p><em>How will I feel about this problem tomorrow?</em></p>
<p><em>Is this situation permanent?</em></p>
<p>In many cases, the answers will deflate the panic and the impulse to overreact.​</p>
<p> </p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Offer extra hugs</strong><strong> </strong>and say<strong> "I love you" </strong>more often<strong>.</strong></li>
</ul>
<p> </p>
<p>The Counseling Center and Disability Services office is here for you during this time. Be well, stay safe, and please reach out to us if you are in need of additional support.</p>
<p>With warm regards,</p>
<p>Counseling Center &amp; Disability Services Team</p>
<p>Phone: (585) 292-2140 *Press 1 for Disability &amp; Press 2 for Counseling</p>
<p>Email: <a href="mailto:counselingservices@monroecc.edu">counselingservices@monroecc.edu</a> &amp; <a href="mailto:disabilityservices@monroecc.edu">disabilityservices@monroecc.edu</a></p>
<p> </p>

MCC Daily Tribune

Parenting During COVID-19

According to the Child Mind Institute, COVID-19 is impacting all families and many families are juggling a lot under quarantine. Balancing work, homework and time with your children can feel overwhelming during this time.

Here are some things to consider:

  • Go back to the basics: It may be helpful to set a schedule for the day. Try to break up long, unstructured periods of the day. Review the daily schedule with the children to include them in the process

 

  • Structure the day: With the usual routines thrown off, establish new daily schedules. Break up schoolwork when possible. Older children and teens can help with schedules, but they should follow a general order, such as:

 

    • Wake-up routines, getting dressed, breakfast and some active play in the morning, followed by quiet play and snack to transition into schoolwork.
    • Lunch, chores, exercise, some online social time with friends, and then homework in the afternoon.
    • Family time & reading before bed.

 

  • Find some time for yourself: Self-care is different for everyone, but self-care can be one minute of the day, five minutes or even an hour. Self-care does not have to cost money; it does mean taking time for yourself.

 

  • Make a plan for staying home: Use helpful reminders to prompt children to complete tasks. Set the children up with an activity when you sit down to work on a homework assignment or test.

 

  • Go easy on yourself: Find comfort knowing that other parents may be facing similar challenges.

 

  • Complete activities together: Remember that you and the children benefit from good sleep, nutrition and exercise each day. Try going for a walk or doing a fun activity at together home.

 

  • Special Time In: Even with everyone home together 24/7, set aside some special time with each child. You select the time, and let your child choose the activity. Just 10 or 20 minutes of your undivided attention, even if only once every few days, will mean a lot to your child. Keep cell phones off or on silent so you don't get distracted. ​

 

  • Take care of yourself: Caregivers also should be sure to take time to exercise, eat healthy, get enough sleep. Give yourself time to decompress and take short breaks. If more than one parent is home, take turns watching the children if possible.

 

  • Remember to take a breath: In addition to reaching out to others for help, the AAP recommends parents feeling overwhelmed or especially stressed to try to take just a few seconds to ask themselves:

Does the problem represent an immediate danger?

How will I feel about this problem tomorrow?

Is this situation permanent?

In many cases, the answers will deflate the panic and the impulse to overreact.​

 

  • Offer extra hugs and say "I love you" more often.

 

The Counseling Center and Disability Services office is here for you during this time. Be well, stay safe, and please reach out to us if you are in need of additional support.

With warm regards,

Counseling Center & Disability Services Team

Phone: (585) 292-2140 *Press 1 for Disability & Press 2 for Counseling

Email: counselingservices@monroecc.edu & disabilityservices@monroecc.edu

 

Lee, Stephanie
Counseling Center & Disability Services
05/11/2020