Sample Course Offerings

Some of the below courses will be designated UR each semester.

AAD 101 - Introduction to Animation
An introduction to general animation techniques, this course combines theoretical elements of film aesthetics with practical experience in animation filmmaking. Emphasis is on creating movement and expression utilizing traditional or electronically generated image sequences. Students are exposed to all types of animated film production through lectures, film presentations, studio work, and outside assignments. This introductory course gives students a working knowledge of animation techniques necessary to design short animated sequences. 3 Credits.

AAD 108 - Ideation: Illustration and Design
This course involves investigation into the basic technical, aesthetic, and conceptual aspects of illustration and design. The philosophy of the course is that innovation is a skill that is both visual and experiential, which, through practice, evokes insights, associations, and resonances. The course teaches basic ideation skills—how to see, think, and respond through observing, experiencing, drawing, and designing to solve a variety of visual problems. This is a studio-based subject involving intensive, practical, hands-on exercises taught simultaneously with visual theory. The course seeks to expand each student's visual vocabulary, aesthetic consciousness, and creative thought. Course takes place within a Macintosh environment utilizing Adobe software. Students will be required to purchase art supplies and materials. - Students may be required to print at a local service bureau. 3 Credits.

AAD 260 - Applied Imaging, Raster Graphics
This course is designed to introduce the benefits, complexities, and application of raster graphics, illustration, and design within a creative explorative environment. The curriculum emphasizes both craft and visual problem-solving. Emphasis is placed on the development of the student’s ability to apply creative thinking and contemporary techniques in creating meaningful and effective photographic illustrations and design. Course projects will emphasize use of computers, digital cameras, and scanners. Course takes place within a Macintosh environment utilizing Adobe software. Students will be required to purchase art supplies and materials. Students may be required to print at a local service bureau. 3 Credits.

BIO 221 - Principles of Biochemistry
A study of the major chemical constituents of cells including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Structure and function will be emphasized. Enzyme kinetics, regulation of enzyme activity, and metabolic pathways will also be covered. Laboratory activities include isolation of biological molecules from different biological samples using a variety of common biochemistry techniques with subsequent analysis and characterization. 4 Credits.

“In the UR-designated version of this course, students conduct weekly laboratory activities that involve experimentation, data collection, and data interpretation.  Additionally, students working in pairs choose two of the weekly laboratory activities to create and present a poster to a general audience at the end of the semester.”

CHE 251 - Organic Chemistry I
This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in organic chemistry. The principles of bonding, molecular structure (with an emphasis on the three-dimensional aspects of structure and stereochemistry), polarities and acid-base properties are reviewed in CHE 251.These principles are extended to organic compounds and their reactions. The course concentrates on organic reactions and their mechanisms. The relationship between molecular structure, properties, and reactivity is emphasized throughout the course. Major topics discussed include: classes of organic compounds and nomenclature, thermodynamics and kinetics, addition reactions of alkenes and alkynes, stereochemistry, resonance and electron delocalization, aromaticity, and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions. The laboratory introduces the basic separation, purification, reaction and structure determination techniques of organic chemistry on the microscale level. Spectroscopic methods of analysis are also emphasized in CHE 251, including: ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis), infrared (IR), and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). These spectroscopic methods are discussed and used in the CHE 251 laboratory. 5 credits.

CHE 252 - Organic Chemistry II
This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in organic chemistry. The principles of bonding, molecular structure (with an emphasis on the three-dimensional aspects of structure and stereochemistry), polarities and acid-base properties introduced in CHE 251 are extended and related to additional types of organic compounds and their reactions. The course concentrates on organic reactions and their mechanisms. The relationship between molecular structure, properties, and reactivity is emphasized throughout the course. Major topics discussed include: reactions of dienes; substitution and elimination reactions; free radical reactions; and nucleophilic addition, substitution, and condensation reactions of carbonyl compounds. If time permits, special topics such as polymers and biomolecules will also be discussed. The laboratory continues and builds on the basic separation, purification, synthesis and structure determination techniques of organic chemistry on the microscale level introduced in the CHE 251 laboratory. Spectroscopic methods of analysis are also emphasized in CHE 252. In addition to the ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis), infrared (IR), and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopic methods introduced in CHE 251, carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) and mass spectroscopy (MS) are also discussed and used in the CHE 252 laboratory. 5 Credits.

COM 120 - Media Literacy
An introduction to the critical consumption of media. This course will focus on the ability to access, analyze, evaluate and communicate the process of creating and interpreting media in a variety of forms. 3 Credits.

ENG 200 - Advanced Composition
Course focuses on written analysis, oral discourse, evaluation, argument and research. Assignments develop depth and proficiency in using language. Basic composition skills are assumed. (Can be taken in place of ENG 101 to satisfy the composition requirement for graduation.) This course may not be taken concurrently with ENG 101. 3 Credits.

ENG 230 - Mythology
Literary, cultural, psychological, and historical study of mythology including such cultures as Greek, Roman, Norse, Mid and Far Eastern, African, and mythologies of Americas. The course emphasizes creation, nature and hero myths as they shaped ancient civilizations and discusses how these myths affect global cultures today. 3 Credits.

HMN 220 - Western Humanities I
An interdisciplinary search for moral, social, and political alternatives and meaning embodied in the institutions, culture, and literature of Western Civilization from the beginnings to 1600. This course is factual as well as conceptual, including a narrative history of the period covered. 4 Credits.

HMN 221 - Western Humanities II
An interdisciplinary search for moral, social, and political alternatives and meaning embodied in the institutions, culture, and literature of Western Civilization from 1600 to the present. This course is factual as well as conceptual, including a narrative history of the period covered. 4 Credits.

HON 102 - Honors Studies: Exploration and Discovery
This is the second in a series of four 1-credit courses that comprise the common experience in the MCC Honors Institute. Students will build on the foundation of the first course as they are introduced to research methodologies in various academic disciplines. Students will also engage in a common service-learning project. 1 Credit.

HON 295 - Research Methods and Academic Writing
This course focuses on analytical, argumentative and research writing, with an emphasis on research strategies and the finer points of advanced academic writing. Students will study and learn to utilize various analytical heuristics to improve their reading, critical thinking, and writing skills. Emphasis will be on the methods of process-based research writing, including library and note-taking strategies, using inquiry to guide research, peer-review workshops, and utilizing citation styles like MLA and APA. Each semester the research and writing will be focused on an overall course theme, such as “Justice and Prejudice” or “Science and Society,” and will require reading and analyzing important works related to this theme as part of the research and writing process. Assignments and readings all seek to prepare students for the course’s final project, a 10-15-page seminar essay, and the course is specifically designed to prepare students for submitting abstracts and presenting their original research at area and regional undergraduate conferences. 3 Credits.

PSY 220 - Research Methods in Social Sciences
Through a combination of lecture and hands-on research projects, this course examines the philosophy and methodology of science and how they are applied to social questions. Students plan and conduct research projects and write papers describing their research following APA style. Topics to be explored include experimental and non-experimental research methods, the development of testable hypotheses, the use of electronic databases to explore and review the scientific literature, and ethical issues. 3 Credits.