Course Descriptions

The following is a complete listing of courses offered at MCC. You can also visit our Programs of Study page for a list of course requirements necessary to complete your degree.

Click on the links to expand the list of courses for each area.


AAD - Applied Art and Design

    AAD 101 - Introduction to Animation

    3 Credits

    An introduction to general animation techniques, this course combines theoretical elements of film aesthetics with practical experience in animation filmmaking. Emphasis is on creating movement and expression utilizing traditional or electronically generated image sequences. Students are exposed to all types of animated film production through lectures, film presentations, studio work and outside assignments. This introductory course gives students a working knowledge of animation techniques necessary to design short animated sequences.

    AAD 104 - Introduction to Graphic Design, 2D

    3 Credits

    A course which will introduce the student to basic graphic skills. Emphasis will be placed on applying the elements and principles of two-dimensional design to specific graphic design tasks in order to build visual literacy skills. Emphasis will be placed on both computer and hand skills used in the production of graphic art work.
    - Course takes place within a Macintosh environment utilizing Adobe software.
    - Students will be required to purchase art supplies and materials.
    - Students may be required to print at a local service bureau.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    AAD 105 - Typography

    3 Credits

    A comprehensive exploration and application of typography in graphic design. Students will study the design and use of typography from historical to contemporary perspectives, explore the relationship between type and image in visual communications, and create projects using typography as a major element of the design.

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    AAD 107 - A History of Graphic Design

    3 Credits

    This course surveys the pivotal events and achievements that led to the current state of graphic design. The unceasing quest to give form to ideas is traced from the pictographs painted on cave walls to the latest imaginative designs. Through lectures, videotapes, discussions, research and studio projects, students are introduced to the creative thinkers, important innovations and breakthrough technologies that have shaped the evolution of visual communication. This course will include discussion of the social, political and economic factors that have influenced art and design through the ages.

    AAD 108 - Ideation: Illustration and Design

    3 Credits

    This course involves investigation into the basic technical, aesthetic and conceptual aspects of illustration and design. The philosophy of the course is that innovation is a skill that is both visual and experiential, which, through practice, evokes insights, associations and resonances. The course teaches basic ideation skills—how to see, think and respond through observing, experiencing, drawing and designing to solve a variety of visual problems. This is a studio-based subject involving intensive, practical, hands-on exercises taught simultaneously with visual theory. The course seeks to expand each student's visual vocabulary, aesthetic consciousness and creative thought.

    - Course takes place within a Macintosh environment utilizing Adobe software.
    - Students will be required to purchase art supplies and materials.
    - Students may be required to print at a local service bureau.

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    AAD 112 - Graphic Design 1

    3 Credits

    This course explores the various aspects of graphic communication and will cover concepts, typography, layout and general graphic techniques. Course materials are designed to advance an understanding of design tools and design principles, artisanship and conceptual skills through the exploration of visual elements, order, concept and language.

    Prerequisite: COM 104/AAD104 and COM 105/AAD 105, or permission of instructor.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    AAD 160 - Graphic Illustration: Vector Drawing

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to introduce the benefits, complexities and application of vector illustration and design (using Bezier curves) within a creative explorative environment. Learning to integrate traditional and digital image making techniques, students will be introduced to various methods of visual problem solving. The skills and ideas covered in this course are invaluable to students considering a career or study path in fine art, design, illustration, print media, motion graphics, animation or other media related arts.

    - Course takes place within a Macintosh environment utilizing Adobe software.
    - Students will be required to purchase art supplies and materials.
    - Students may be required to print at a local service bureau.

    Prerequisite: COM 104/AAD 104 or IDE 160 or permission of instructor

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    AAD 167 - Web Design: Graphics

    3 Credits

    A Graphic Design course that provides instruction in various processes that involves the planning for, and designing of Internet-based information publishing. Introduces students to the theoretical principles of visual language and also affords the practical opportunity to apply the principles using modern Internet publishing tools. Topics include; image design and preparation, typography, viewer expectations, precedence (guiding the eye), navigation, usability and accessibility practices, and some techniques for the evaluation of web design.

    - Course takes place within a Macintosh environment utilizing Adobe software.
    - Students will be required to purchase art supplies and materials.
    - Students may be required to print at a local service bureau.

    Prerequisite: AAD 160, AAD 104 and AAD 105, or permission of instructor

    AAD 205 - Graphic Design 2

    3 Credits

    This course explores the creative display, organization and communication of ideas and information through word and image. The design principles covered in these courses apply to all presentation media; print, computer, film/video, exhibit and environmental graphics. Course projects will require typographic skills and an ability to communicate with pictorial information.

    Prerequisite: COM 112/AAD 112

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    AAD 220 - Professional Practices

    3 Credits

    This course will review, through practice, the application of professional trade customs associated with the visual arts. The experience is intended to give students an understanding of production procedures and business practices relevant to creative professionals. Students will learn the basics of managing creative practices such as design and/or illustrative work from initial client contact to project completion. Production issues related to the various applied arts will be studied—types of businesses, methods of finding work, examining costs, common pitfalls, writing contracts, managing design/illustration/creative jobs, and preparing digital work for production. Working with other creative artists, and copyright law, as it applies to visual arts, will also be studied.

    - Course takes place within a Macintosh environment utilizing Adobe software.
    - Students will be required to purchase art supplies and materials.
    - Students will be required to print at a local service bureau.

    Prerequisite(s): AAD 104 and AAD 105.

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    AAD 256 - Motion Graphics

    3 Credits

    Introduction to time based graphic design. Students will be exposed to both traditional and experimental methods of producing short motion sequences. Through a series of exercises and assignments, conceptual problem solving and the design of motion graphics will be emphasized. In addition to producing short motion sequences students will also view and discuss various commercial and independent works. Students must be able to practice good organizational and planning skills. Experience in design, photo imaging and vector graphics is a plus, but not necessary.

    Prerequisite: AAD 105 Typography or permission of instructor

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    AAD 260 - Applied Imaging, Raster Graphics

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to introduce the benefits, complexities and application of raster graphics, illustration and design within a creative explorative environment. The curriculum emphasizes both craft and visual problem solving. Emphasis is placed on the development of the student’s ability to apply creative thinking and contemporary techniques in creating meaningful and effective photographic illustrations and design. Course projects will emphasize use of computers, digital cameras and scanners.

    - Course takes place within a Macintosh environment utilizing Adobe software.
    - Students will be required to purchase art supplies and materials.
    - Students may be required to print at a local service bureau.

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    AAD 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

ACC - Accounting

    ACC 101 - Accounting Principles I

    4 Credits

    Basic principles of financial accounting for the business enterprise with emphasis on the valuation of business assets, measurement of net income, and double-entry techniques for recording transactions. Introduction to the cycle of accounting work, preparation of financial statements, and adjusting and closing procedures.

    Prerequisite(s):TRS 094 or MTH 130, either with a grade of C or better OR MCC Level 4 Mathematics Placement OR equivalent.

    ACC 102 - Accounting Principles II

    4 Credits

    A continuation of the basic principles of financial accounting including a study of corporation accounts and the statement of cash flows. The course deals with the development of accounting theory with emphasis on managerial techniques for interpretation and use of data in planning and controlling business activities.

    Prerequisite: ACC 101 with a minimum grade of C or higher, or the sequence ACC 110 and ACC 111 with an average grade of at least C.

    ACC 130 - Introductory Accounting and Financial Analysis

    4 Credits

    Basic principles of both financial and managerial accounting with the focus on what accounting information is, what it means, and how to use it. Students will learn that accounting is a vital link between business events and business decisions.

    Prerequisite(s): TRS 094 or MTH 130, either with a grade of C or better OR MCC Level 4 Mathematics Placement OR equivalent.

    ACC 201 - Introduction to QuickBooks

    3 Credits

    An applied approach to the use of Intuit QuickBooks. Material covered will include sales and receivables; payables and purchases; closing procedures; payroll; and company set-up for service and merchandising companies.

    Scheduled to be offered in the Fall Semester during the day and the Spring Semester during the evening.

    Prerequisite: ACC 101 with a minimum grade of C or higher, or the sequence ACC 110 and ACC 111 with an average grade of at least C.

    ACC 202 - Payroll Accounting

    2 Credits

    To provide an interesting and useful understanding of accounting for payroll. The course will cover all the basics of payroll, including many of the laws affecting payroll.

    Course offered Fall semester during the evening and the Spring semester during the day.

    Prerequisite: ACC 101 with a minimum grade of C or higher, or the sequence ACC 110 and ACC 111 with an average grade of at least C.

    ACC 204 - Tax Procedures

    3 Credits

    A study of federal, state, and local tax law and procedures for corporations, partnerships, and individuals.

    Course offered Fall semester during the evening and Spring semester during the day.

    Prerequisite: ACC 101 with a minimum grade of C or higher, or the sequence ACC 110 and ACC 111 with an average grade of at least C.

    ACC 210 - Intermediate Accounting I

    4 Credits

    A more analytical treatment of accounting theory and practice, with a review and amplification of basic procedures. Topics include cash, receivables, inventories, plant assets, intangible assets, time value of money, and financial statement preparation, presentation and disclosure with emphasis on generally accepted accounting principles.

    Course offered Fall semester during the day and Spring semester during the evening.

    Prerequisite: ACC 102 with a grade of C or higher.

    ACC 220 - Cost Accounting

    3 Credits

    The basic procedures and techniques of accounting used to determine, accumulate and control the cost of production and distribution of goods and services in today's economy. Process and job-order methods, standards and standard cost, techniques of cost analysis and control.

    Course offered Fall semester during the evening and Spring semester during the day.

    Prerequisite: ACC 102 with a grade of C or higher.

    MCC General Education: MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    ACC 230 - Accounting Systems and Applications

    3 Credits

    A hands-on introduction to software used by accountants. The course will focus on the problem-solving capabilities of Excel in handling various accounting and financial issues.

    Course offered Fall semester during the evening and Spring semester during the day.

    Prerequisite: ACC 102 WITH A GRADE OF C OR HIGHER; PLUS EITHER CRC125 OR BUS 220.

    ACC 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

ACD - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency

    ACD 140 - Alcoholism/Chemical Dependency and the Human Service Worker

    3 Credits

    Designed to heighten students' awareness of substance abuse problems. Students will develop a base knowledge concerning the pharmacology of drugs, including the different types of drugs and their physiological and psychological effects. An exploration of the social response to their use will be included. Areas of social service practice to be covered include theories and models of the etiology of chemical dependency as well as tactics of prevention and treatment designed to meet client needs.

    Carries MCC college credit and 45 hours N.Y.S. OASAS-approved credit.

    Prerequisite: Placement at ENG 101 level.

    ACD 142 - Alcoholism/Chemical Dependency and the Family System

    3 Credits

    Provides students with the pertinent education and training related to issues and information specific to the effects of alcohol and other drug abuse/dependency on the family system and the community, including, but not limited to, physical, developmental, psychological, cultural and sociological implications. Case management, methods of assessment, therapeutic treatment techniques and resources within the community will be addressed.

    Carries MCC college credit and 45 hours N.Y.S. OASAS-approved credit.

    Prerequisite: ACD 140 with a grade C or higher or taken concurrently.

    ACD 143 - Alcoholism/Chemical Dependency Counseling Skills

    3 Credits

    Development of specialized skills in individual counseling specific to the field of chemical dependency. A major component will be the in-depth consideration of each client's individual needs.

    Carries MCC college credit and 45 hours N.Y.S. OASAS-approved credit.

    Prerequisite: ACD 140 with a grade of C or higher or taken concurrently.

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    ACD 144 - Alcoholism/Chemical Dependency/Substance Abuse Group Counseling Skills

    3 Credits

    Development of specialized skills in group counseling appropriate in the field of chemical dependence counseling. Methods of application of these skills and knowledge necessary for implementing effective counseling will be provided.

    Carries MCC college credit and 45 hours N.Y.S. OASAS-approved credit.

    Prerequisite: ACD 140 with a grade of C or higher or taken concurrently.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    ACD 241 - Alcoholism/Chemical Dependency Treatment Modalities

    3 Credits

    Provides students with a comprehensive education related to the broad range of planned and continuing services, included, but not limited to: diagnostic evaluation, continuing assessment, counseling, medical pharmacological, psychiatric , psychological, spiritual and social care, relapse prevention, vocational rehabilitation and career counseling. Will develop cognizance of confidentiality and ethical issues involved in assessment and treatment, which may be extended to persons with alcohol and other substance abuse problems.

    -Carries MCC college credit and 45 hours N.Y.S. OASAS-approved credit.

    Prerequisite: ACD 140 with a grade of C or higher

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW)

    ACD 245 - Special Issues in the Field of Alcoholism/Chemical Dependency/Substance Abuse

    3 Credits

    Provides students with the knowledge and skills that will prepare them to understand and deliver appropriate services to individuals who have been affected by the use/abuse/dependency on alcohol and other drugs. Issues will include, but not be limited to, communicable diseases, socio-cultural topics, cultural relevance, MICA population, adolescents, elderly, women, gay/lesbian population, violence and abuse, advocacy, counseling wellness, supervision, prevention, and community education.

    -Carries MCC college credit and 45 hours N.Y.S. OASAS-approved credit.

    Prerequisite: ACD 140 with a grade of C or higher

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    ACD 246 - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency Internship Seminar

    6 Credits

    Provides students with in-depth experience in the addiction treatment field. Students will complete an internship totaling 300 hours for the course i.e. averaging 20 hours per week for 15
    weeks, plus a 2-hour-a-week seminar, or 25 hours a week plus a 2 1/2 hour-a-week seminar in the 12 week summer program. In the seminar, issues encountered by the students in their internships will be addressed, and information regarding some needed skills and knowledge will be provided. Internship hours worked in addiction treatment agencies may be counted as volunteer work hours or as educational hours toward the N.Y.S. CASAC but not both.

    Prerequisite(s): ACD140, ACD143, ACD144, ENG101, HUM101/HUM111, all with a C or higher and permission of instructor.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    ACD 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

AFS - African American Studies

    AFS 100 - Introduction to African-American Studies

    3 Credits

    This is an interdisciplinary exploration of the experience and initiative of people of African descent throughout the world. Students will be introduced to the history, religion, sociology, politics, economics, creative production and psychology of African peoples, especially in the United States. In addition, the course introduces a variety of perspectives, theories, practical applications and methods of studying African peoples and their social evolution. A student may earn credit for HIS102 or AFS100, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    AFS 200 - African-American Family

    3 Credits

    A comprehensive examination of the diverse and complex issues surrounding the African-American family unit as it has evolved from pre-slavery to contemporary period. It focuses on historical, social, cultural, political, economic and global conditions that have affected that institution. The course discusses key issues, themes and debates in the field and analyzes a variety of theoretical perspectives of examining the African-American family life.

    A student may earn credit for SOC 205 or AFS 200, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

AGS - Agricultural Studies

    AGS 101 - Introduction to Agriculture

    1 Credit

    The course will include the introduction of some basic scientific principles relating to agriculture and food production. Students will gain an awareness of educational and career opportunities in agriculture. Examples of global and local agriculture will be presented through readings, discussion, and field trips. The course is designed for any student interested in agriculture and food production.

    AGS 110 - Introduction to Greenhouse Management

    3 Credits

    A basic course emphasizing the significance and use of controlled climate structures. Studies include grow structures, plant growth, propagation, pest and disease management. This course is designed for the career or non-science student.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    AGS 150 - General Microbiology for Food and Agriculture

    4 Credits

    An introduction to the basic principles relating to microorganisms and contaminants associated with food and fiber production. Students will gain an awareness and understanding of pathogens, contaminants, and control methods associated with fresh and processed foods while maintaining quality. The course is designed for a student interested in agriculture and food production.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    AGS 200 - Food and Agriculture Problem Solving - Behavioral Applications

    3 Credits

    This capstone course will utilize an organizational behavior approach for understanding behavior in the workplace to better manage change within food and agriculturally related organizations. This course is intended for those who want to develop the tools for understanding, analyzing and accounting for the work behaviors of individuals and groups. It will use a combination of teambuilding exercises, self-assessment inventories, and case analysis to develop insights that facilitate self-knowledge and teamwork in a dynamic global environment. Topics covered will include, but not be limited to, teamwork and team processes, personality and values, conflict resolution, organizational politics, leadership, motivation, communications, decision making and accountability.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 and any two of: AGS 101, AGS 110, or AGS 150, or permission of instructor.

    AGS 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

ANT - Anthropology

    ANT 101 - General Anthropology

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the fields of anthropology with emphasis on archaeology and physical anthropology. Explores the range of human biological and cultural diversity as indicated by archaeological remains and the human fossil record. Facts and theories about human nature and human culture are examined in evolutionary and comparative perspective.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ANT 102 - Cultural Anthropology

    3 Credits

    A cross-cultural study of the variety of human adaptations to physical, social and cultural environments, primarily in terms of subsistence, technology, social groupings, government, economic organization, religion and aesthetics. Students are encouraged to discover the meaning behind cultural differences and similarities wherever they occur.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ANT 105 - Forensic Anthropology

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the methods and techniques used by forensic anthropologists to identify and recover human remains and establish circumstances of death. Using case reports and skeletal materials, students explore how anthropologists work with other disciplines to estimate age, gender, ethnic affiliation, stature, traumatic injury and pathologies. Students will develop analytical and critical thinking skills needed to reconstruct events surrounding the life and death of individuals both ancient and modern.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ANT 201 - Native American Peoples and Cultures

    3 Credits

    Survey of the major regional cultural divisions of North and Meso-America, with intensive analysis of Indian societies selected to illustrate the range of economic, political and social institutions, and the relevance of ecological and historical factors.

    Prerequisites: ANT 101 or ANT 102 or SOC 101 or permission of instructor.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ANT 202 - Anthropology of Religion

    3 Credits

    Explores anthropological data on and interpretations of human religious experience from Paleolithic times to modern satanic cults. Students are guided across a spectrum of religious behavior, Worldview, religious specialists, ritual, magic, the supernatural, and consequences of religious variability are examined in light of our need to escape culture-bound conceptions of religion.

    Prerequisite: ANT 102 OR SOC 101 OR permission of instructor.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ANT 205 - Archaeology Field School

    3 Credits

    This course will offer students the opportunity to participate in an ongoing excavation of the Castle-Kumpf Farm, a 19th Century Euro-American farmstead located near Spencerport in Monroe County, New York. Students will broaden their understanding of anthropology, history, and science through training and practical experience in archaeology. Training and practical experience in a variety of archaeological field methods such as artifact analysis and record keeping will be provided. Students gain an understanding of basic techniques of survey, excavation, and post-excavation lab work. This will enhance concepts and practices acquired from previous coursework and be applicable to future courses, other archaeological fieldwork, or to their knowledge of local history.

    This is a two-week course meeting for six hours each day (with a lunch break), Monday through Friday.

    Prerequisite: ANT 101 recommended

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ANT 216 - Special Topics in Anthropology

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to address specific topics of interest in Anthropology. Offerings are more specific and focused than the introductory surveys. Examples may include Human Variation, Primatology, Anthropology of Art, and Ancient Texts.

    Topics may change from semester to semester based on faculty and student interest.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    ANT 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

    Learning Attributes: WR

ARA - Arabic/Foreign Language

    ARA 101 - Elementary Arabic I

    3 Credits

    Designed for students with little or no previous experience in the language. Focuses on communicative skills of listening comprehension and speaking, and in developing mastery of the Arabic writing system for basic reading and writing of simple sentences and short paragraphs. Arabic letters are taught so that students will be able to communicate both orally and in written form in the most essential everyday life situations. Students will also learn customs, traditions, and culture of Arabic speaking countries. Student participation, group discussion and use of digital media are essential elements of the course.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    ARA 102 - Elementary Arabic II

    3 Credits

    Continuation of ARA 101 with emphasis on basic language skills for communication and on cultural aspects to promote understanding and appreciation of the Arabic culture. Student participation, group discussion and the use of digital media are essential elements of the course.

    Prerequisite: ARA 101 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Memory and length of time since last studied are factors in successful placement.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    ARA 203 - Intermediate Arabic I

    3 Credits

    Continued study in Arabic for those with a firm foundation in elementary Arabic communication, written and oral. Grammar and vocabulary are continued at a higher level so that the student develops strong reading and writing skills in order to create complex sentences and short paragraphs. In this class, the student will attain oral and listening skills to successfully function in a variety of daily situations. Cultural topics are included in the study of grammar and structure. Memory and length of time since last studied are factors in successful placement.

    Prerequisite(s): ARA 102 OR SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF EQUIVALENT, OR PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

ART - Art

    ART 101 - Art Essentials

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to improve the student's visual perception and expand critical awareness through a variety of hands-on studio projects. The student will become familiar with the methods, materials, media, vocabulary, and techniques of making art. This course is suggested for students who are interested in developing their creative skills but are not art majors.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ART 102 - Fine Arts: Theory and Practice

    3 Credits

    This course is required for those enrolling in the Fine Arts degree program, planning to graduate and transfer, and is designed to be taken in the first semester. It is a springboard for a multitude of interests for a future in the arts. The student is introduced through lecture, reading, writing, and discussion, to topics addressing our expectations and the student's preparation to succeed in the program. Additionally, an overview of the offerings in the discipline, and the expectations and interactions of the Fine Arts courses are provided. The general knowledge areas include: fine arts theory and practice; a personal development plan; the creative process and ideation; exposure to contemporary art practices; and theoretical readings.

    ART 104 - Drawing I: Foundation

    3 Credits

    An introductory course that provides the student with experiences in working with a variety of subject matter and media. Various methods and materials (such as graphite, charcoal, conte crayon, and ink) will be explored, and a variety of mixed media techniques will be introduced. A range of drawing concepts will be covered including line, mass, texture, value, color, composition, and space. Emphasis is placed on the development of observational and technical skills needed for image making. Students are responsible for purchasing their own materials for this course.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ART 108 - Sketchbook: Processes and Materials

    3 Credits

    This course is aimed at any artist, designer or craftsperson who wishes to develop their creative skills through working in sketchbooks. Students will explore traditional and contemporary uses of the sketchbook as an essential tool in creative practice. Emphasis will be placed on ideation, exploration of materials and techniques, and the development of each student’s creative process and areas of interest. The sketchbook will be presented both as a work in its own right and as a preparatory tool for future creative activity.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-H in addition to the other listed category below.

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 or permission of instructor

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ART 109 - Two Dimensional Design: Foundation

    3 Credits

    The intent of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of two-dimensional design. Emphasis will be placed on the elements and principles of two-dimensional design and their use as the building blocks of visual literacy. Through lectures and hands-on assignments, students will gain an understanding of the concepts, vocabulary and skills needed to facilitate their understanding of visual organization. Through the critique process students will have the opportunity to evaluate and analyze their work and the work of others. Students are responsible for purchasing their own materials for this course.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ART 110 - Comics and Sequential Art

    3 Credits

    This class is designed to take students through the process of creating their own comic book or sequential narrative. We will also examine the evolution of the comic, how the comic book is referenced in contemporary society, and appropriate grant writing and portfolio procedures for the comic industry. The course will be divided into three areas: materials, drawing techniques, and themes. While exploring these areas of emphasis, students will begin to develop their own style and voice which will be examined through a series of critiques throughout the semester.

    Prerequisite: ENG 101

    ART 115 - Introduction to Illustration

    3 Credits

    This course explores a full range of current commercial illustration methods and techniques utilizing the following media: pen and ink, colored pencils, water based media, and marker rendering. This course is also designed to give the student hands on introductory experience in the electronic design studio environment. The student will become acquainted with the computer as another art tool. Students will be using software on the Macintosh computers as well as peripherals such as color scanner, and digital cameras.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ART 118 - Perspectives of Art History I: Ancient

    3 Credits

    Introduces the student to major artistic periods from prehistoric times to the Renaissance by examining the function and role of the artist in various periods of Western and Non-Western history. Major works studied will include objects from China and Japan as well as art and architecture from ancient civilizations such as Egypt, Greece, and Rome. The major emphasis of the course will be on the roots of European artistic developments from ancient times through the Gothic period of Medieval Europe.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-H in addition to the other listed category below.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-WC - Western Civilization (SWCV)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ART 119 - Perspectives of Art History II: Modern

    3 Credits

    Introduces the student to major artistic periods from the Renaissance to contemporary art by examining the function and role of the artist in various periods of history with an emphasis on the origins and developments of artistic styles such as High Renaissance, Baroque, Romanticism, Realism, and Cubism. The course will survey major works by artists such as Michelangelo, Jan van Eyck, David, Van Gogh, Picasso, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Frank Lloyd Wright.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-H in addition to the other listed category below.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-WC - Western Civilization (SWCV)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ART 120 - Painting I

    3 Credits

    This course provides a foundation for a basic experience with painting. Exploration with the methods, materials and concepts of acrylic painting will be carried out in a studio setting. Through specifically assigned problems, the beginning student will develop a visual painting vocabulary. Color theory, pictorial composition, figure/ground relationships, visual perception, spatial concepts, and critical thinking skills will all be emphasized. Participation in individual and group critiques of work produced during the course is expected. Students are responsible for purchasing their own materials for this course.

    Prerequisite: ART 104 or permission of instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ART 121 - Perspectives of Art History III: Non-Western Art

    3 Credits

    An introductory course that focuses on the history, development and current influences of non-western art. Particular emphasis is on objects, images and architecture from India, China, Korea, Southeast Asia, Pre-Columbian and Native North and South Americas, Africa, and the cultures of the South Pacific Islands.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-H in addition to the other listed category below.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ART 125 - Three Dimensional Design: Foundation

    3 Credits

    This course introduces the student to how the elements of line, plane, shape, volume and mass are manipulated in the design of 3D forms. Texture, transparency, unification, modification, color, and other effects on these elements are also incorporated. The elements are defined, experimented with individually, in combination, and cumulatively. Individuality is encouraged within the structured framework of each project. Students experience a wide range of materials and processes to develop a broad three-dimensional experience. Students are responsible for purchasing their own materials for this course.

    ART 130 - Sculpture I

    3 Credits

    This course offers a foundation in sculpture as necessary for continued sculptural exploration, including basic knowledge of additive, subtractive, and casting processes. Historical context, the creative process, conceptual development, evaluation, and criticism are emphasized. Students explore these issues through individual projects within a structured framework.

    Prerequisite: ART 125

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ART 154 - Drawing the Human Figure

    3 Credits

    This is an intensive studio-based course that deals primarily with the human form via the nude model and additional supporting means for that study. Assignments are designed to give the students the visual tools needed to accomplish accurate rendering of the figure, with emphasis on anatomy, proportion and the creative interpretation of the human form. A variety of media will be explored such as graphite, conte crayon, charcoal and ink wash. Guided strategies such as contour, gesture, and tonal studies will be utilized while drawing poses that vary in duration. Students are responsible for purchasing their own materials for this course.

    Prerequisite: ART 104 or permission of instructor

    ART 175 - Art Travel

    Variable Credit

    A course that combines classroom instruction at the MCC campus with travel to and instruction at various off-campus locations including art museums, historical and landmark houses, art galleries, architecturally noteworthy urban sites or town developments.

    ART 200 - Arts Management

    3 Credits

    This course offers an opportunity to experience the day to day challenges of administrating a museum, gallery, box office, performing groups, music recording studio and theater. The student will examine the many aspects of organizing, planning, preparation, promotion and presentation of arts events and productions. The student will learn the methods of working with artists, budgeting, contracts and grant writing. Utilizing Monroe Community College's Visual and Performing Arts department facilities and other experimental spaces around the campus and Greater Rochester, students will have an opportunity to get hands-on experiences working in the field. The course will have invited guest speakers, art critics, arts managers, and other arts professionals. Field trips to the areas cultural resources will familiarize the student with the rewarding career possibilities in these professions.

    Prerequisite: Minimum of 24 credits of college course study.

    ART 204 - Drawing II

    3 Credits

    This course expands upon the basic skills developed in ART 104. The student will be provided with advanced drawing problems related to creative and expressive image making. Various approaches to methods, materials, subject and content will be explored as a way to continue to develop the student’s conceptual and perceptual abilities. Students are responsible for purchasing their own materials for this course.

    Prerequisite: ART 104

    ART 205 - Commercial Illustration I

    3 Credits

    A course which explores a full range of current commercial illustration methods and techniques utilizing the following media: pencil, pen and ink, watercolor, and collage.

    Prerequisites: ART 104, ART 109 or permission of instructor.

    ART 206 - Commercial Illustration II

    3 Credits

    A continuation of ART 205 emphasizing advanced illustration techniques including those utilizing basic computer skills for completion of assignments. This course focuses on illustration assignments as they are commissioned by art directors of graphic studios, ad agencies, magazines, book and newspaper companies.

    Prerequisites: ART 104, ART 109, ART 205 or permission of instructor.

    ART 220 - Painting II

    3 Credits

    This course expands upon the foundation established in Painting I. Increased emphasis will be placed on experimentation, the expressive potentials of the medium, and on developing a perspective on the relationship between the formal techniques and the conceptual aspects of painting. Participation in individual and group critiques of work produced during the course is expected. Students are responsible for purchasing their own materials.

    Prerequisite: ART 120 or permission of instructor.

    ART 230 - Sculpture II

    3 Credits

    This course is a continuation of sculpture including figure study of the torso, and personal exploration in any of the three areas studied in ART 130. The student will concentrate on the development of a concept, experimentation, technical drawings and maquettes, leading to the creation of the final sculptural project.

    Prerequisite: ART 130

    ART 231 - Art Seminar/Portfolio Development

    3 Credits

    A course for the student who has completed 20 credits in the visual arts, interior design, or graphic arts courses. The seminar will critically summarize the students' art experiences and provide techniques and methods to sustain, maintain and foster personal and professional growth in their fields. Topics to be covered are: self-evaluation techniques, preparing, presenting and maintaining a professional portfolio, transfer advisement and career advisement. Guest lectures, visits to arts organizations, art galleries, area colleges, private and commercial studios, will expose the student to a variety of arts organizations and career possibilities.

    ART 240 - Women, Art and Society

    3 Credits

    This course examines the role of women in the visual arts as both image maker (artist) and as image (subject) and how these images reflect social constructs/expectations.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ART 271 - 20th Century Art and Ideas

    3 Credits

    A survey course in modern and contemporary art from 1870 to the present with an emphasis on innovations and developments in 20th century painting, sculpture, architecture, urban planning, photography, and the decorative arts. Individual artists and movements such as constructivism, art deco, dadaism, cubism, expressionism, international style, and post-modernism will be studied in relationship to the events and works that shape our present cultural environment.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-H in addition to the other listed category below.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ART 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

ASL - American Sign Language/Foreign Language

    ASL 101 - American Sign Language I

    3 Credits

    Designed for students with little or no previous experience in the language. Focuses on communicative skills of sign comprehension and production. Includes high frequency vocabulary, basic sentence constructions, common phrases, and cultural aspects of the Deaf community. Also stresses student participation in skills development.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    ASL 102 - American Sign Language II

    3 Credits

    A continuation of ASL 101, with emphasis on basic language skills for communication and on cultural aspects to promote understanding and appreciation of Deaf culture.

    Prerequisite: ASL 101 or permission of the instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    ASL 201 - American Deaf Culture and Community

    3 Credits

    This course provides a thorough analysis of the development of Deaf culture in the United States of America. Topics include: education of the D/deaf; Deaf films, theaters and clubs; preservation of American Sign Language; technology and services in the Deaf community; cochlear implantation. The student's acculturation process is facilitated by active participation in the Rochester Deaf community. This course is taught in ASL.

    Prerequisite: ASL 102; Corequisite: ASL 203

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    ASL 203 - American Sign Language III

    3 Credits

    A continuation of ASL 102 for those with a basic foundation in American Sign Language communication. Grammar and vocabulary are continued at a higher level. Cultural topics are included in the study of grammar and structure.

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 102 or permission of instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    ASL 204 - American Sign Language IV

    3 Credits

    A continuation of ASL 203 for students with intermediate competency in the language. Special attention is given to application of complex grammatical principles, including non-manual signals and temporal/distributional aspects.

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 203 or permission of instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    ASL 216 - Special Topics in Deaf Studies and ASL

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to address specific topics of interest in Deaf Studies and ASL. Offerings are more specific and focused than the Introductory surveys. Offerings provide students with a deeper understanding and appreciation of Deaf Studies and ASL. Examples of possible offerings include, but is not limited to: Artistic Expressions of Deafhood, Deaf Art and Cinema, Career Explorations in the Sign Language Field and General Linguistics. Topics may change from semester to semester based on faculty and student interest. The classes will be primarily lecture and discussion based and may include occasional relevant outside events.

    Prerequisite(s): ASL 103 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

ATP - Automotive Technology

    ATP 100 - Automotive Services

    3 Credits

    This hands-on course is designed for both consumers interested in repairing
    their own cars and individuals interested in entry level skills that will help them gain employment in the automotive industry. Lectures, demonstrations and hands-on activities provide an overview of automotive systems.

    Can be substituted for any one of the ATP 171-176 work experience courses.

    ATP 101 - Introduction to Automotive Technology

    5 Credits

    An introductory course designed for automotive students that provides theory for a foundation in the field of automotive technology. All systems of the automobile are covered.

    Prerequisite: Permission of the department.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    ATP 102 - Electrical/Electronic Systems 1 - Automotive

    3 Credits

    A study of basic automotive electricity including Ohms law, circuit analysis, meter usage, discrete solid state components, magnetic induction, motor principles, and wire repair.

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department

    ATP 103 - Electrical 2 - Automotive

    4 Credits

    It is required that students have an extensive electrical theory background or have completed ATP 102 or ATP 152. Theory-related instruction and demonstration of testing and repair procedures covers automotive charging, starting, lighting, and accessories. Schematic reading is emphasized throughout the course.

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Department.

    ATP 104 - Emission Controls, Computer and Fuel Systems I

    3 Credits

    Theory related instruction and demonstration of testing and repair procedures covering emission controls, engine performance diagnosis, 2 & 4 gas analysis, scope patterns, and ignition systems.

    ATP 105 - Brakes - Automotive

    4.5 Credits

    Theory related instruction and demonstration of testing and repair procedures covering automotive brake systems. Includes drum and disc brakes, hydraulic systems, power assist and anti-lock systems.

    Prerequisite: Permission of Department

    ATP 106 - Steering and Suspension - Automotive

    5 Credits

    In-depth study of adjustable and non-adjustable alignment measurements with emphasis on proper alignment techniques, methods of adjustment, complete 4-wheel alignment. Manual and power steering system diagnosis and repair, complete suspension system service including coil spring, torsion bar, and MacPherson struts.

    Prerequisite: Permission of Department

    ATP 107 - Automatic Transmission and Transaxle - Automotive

    4 Credits

    This course includes the theory of operation, diagnosis, maintenance and repair of automobile transmissions and transaxles. There will be emphasis on hands-on work.

    Prerequisite: Permission of Department

    ATP 108 - Engine Repair - Automotive

    4 Credits

    Instruction in the 4-stroke theory and practical procedures necessary to diagnose and repair automotive type gasoline engines. Includes diagnosis, component inspection, proper disassembly and reassembly procedures, and critical engine measurements.

    Prerequisite: Permission of Department

    ATP 109 - Heating and Air Conditioning - Automotive

    3 Credits

    Theory related instruction and demonstration of testing and repair procedures covering automotive heating and air conditioning systems. This course provides theory for R-12 and R-134a systems.

    Prerequisite: Permission of Department

    ATP 112 - Engine Performance - Automotive

    4 Credits

    The theory, operation and diagnosis of computerized engine controls and fuel systems.

    Prerequisite: Permission of Department

    ATP 114 - Toyota (T-TEN) Automotive Co-op I

    .5 Credits

    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for Toyota (T-TEN) automotive students.

    ATP 115 - Toyota (T-TEN) Automotive Co-op II

    .5 Credits

    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for Toyota (T-TEN) Automotive students.

    ATP 116 - Toyota (T-TEN) Automotive Co-op III

    .5 Credits


    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for Toyota (T-TEN) Automotive students.

    ATP 117 - Toyota (T-TEN) Automotive Co-op IV

    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for Toyota (T-TEN) Automotive students.

    ATP 139 - Applied Automotive Techniques

    2 Credits

    This is a performance based hands on course designed for individuals interested in developing entry level skills that will help them gain employment in the automotive industry. Demonstrations and hands on LAB activities provide practical experience of service tasks related to automotive systems. Students must provide their own tools. It is required that students have completed ATP 100 plus ATP 151, or ATP 101.

    Prerequisite: Permission of the department

    ATP 140 - Automotive Technology Co-op Seminar

    .5 Credits

    Career related seminar offered one hour per week (15 hours); prepares students for their co-op in-dealership experience.

    ATP 141 - GM (ASEP) Automotive Co-op I

    .5 Credits

    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for GM (ASEP) automotive students.

    ATP 142 - GM (ASEP) Automotive Co-op II

    .5 Credits

    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for GM (ASEP) automotive students.​

    ATP 143 - GM (ASEP) Automotive Co-op III

    .5 Credits

    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for GM (ASEP) automotive students.​

    ATP 144 - GM (ASEP) Automotive Co-op IV

    .5 Credits

    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for GM (ASEP) Automotive students.​

    ATP 145 - GM (ASEP) Automotive Coop V

    .5 Credits

    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for GM (ASEP) Automotive students.

    ATP 171 - General (A-TAP) Automotive Co-op I

    .5 Credits

    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for General (A-TAP) automotive students.

    ATP 172 - General (A-TAP) Automotive Co-op II

    .5 Credits

    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for General (A-TAP) automotive students.

    ATP 173 - General (A-TAP) Automotive Co-op III

    .5 Credits

    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for General (A-TAP) automotive students.

    ATP 174 - General (A-TAP) Automotive Co-op IV

    .5 Credits

    This is a 15-week co-op course in mechanical repair work experience for General (A-TAP) automotive students.

    ATP 275 - Modern Welding Techniques

    3 Credits

    This course is an introduction to MIG and TIG welding and plasma cutting. These skills are practical and often essential for various craftspersons. Students will work with aluminum, stainless steel, and other common metals in this course. This course is offered off-site at Mahaney Welding. In addition to tuition, part-time students must purchase student insurance. Students should also expect to purchase a pre-packaged kit of course materials including their safety equipment and book.

    ATP 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

BIO - Biology

    BIO 114 - Natural History of Greater Rochester

    3 Credits

    Teaches the basic biological concepts through an experience-based approach. Field trips will be held at local sites of geological and biological interest. Topics covered will include: identification of woody plants, wildflowers, insects, birds and mushrooms; the ecology of fields, woods and wetlands; and bedrock and glacial geology.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 116 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    3 Credits

    A course which deals with biological aspects of humans and their impact on the environment. Students will study ecological principles that govern the world and will examine current environmental problems and issues. They will develop a greater awareness of global interdependence and the role of individuals in affecting environmental issues. This course is designed for the career or non-science student.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    BIO 117 - Basic Consumer Nutrition

    3 Credits

    A lecture course that will present information on nutrients and their use by the body. Topics include digestion, usage of nutrients, consequences of nutrient deficiencies or excesses, energy production and analysis of individual diets. Current research is integrated into the course. Depending on program requirements, this course can meet both Food Service (FSA 117) or Natural Science (BIO 117) elective or course requirement. A student may earn credit for BIO 117 or FSA 117, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses.

    MCC General Education: MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 118 - Practical Botany

    3 Credits

    A basic course emphasizing the significance and use of plants. Studies include simplified plant anatomy and physiology, propagation, cultivation and use of plants for food, landscaping and other purposes. This course is designed for the career or non-science student.

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 120 - Essentials of Life Science

    4 Credits

    An introduction to selected principles of the biological sciences explored through current topics in biology. Areas of study will include the organization of life, cell structure and function, DNA structure and heredity, biodiversity, evolution, and ecology. This course is designed for the career or non-science student.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 123 - Nutrition for Sport and Exercise

    3 Credits

    Sports nutrition combines the fields of nutrition and exercise physiology. The student will learn which type of foods, beverages, and/or supplements are needed for optimal performance in sporting events. The student will gain practical experience on how nutrition plays a role in how the body functions and performs during sporting events.

    MCC General Education: MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 132 - Laboratory to Accompany Human Biology

    1 Credit

    Laboratory exercises in human anatomy and physiology to supplement BIO 133 class lectures and text information. Bio 132 is a late start, 10 week course that has 3 lab hours per week. NOTE: This course only meets SUNY General Education Natural Science requirements when both BIO 132 and BIO 133 are successfully completed.

    Prerequisite or corequisite: BIO 133.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 133 - Human Biology

    3 Credits

    A study of the structure and function of the human body. The cause and effects of certain diseases are also included. The course is designed for the career or non-science student.

    NOTE: Students who successfully complete BIO 133 may, with the addition of BIO 132, complete the requirement for SUNY Natural Science General Education BIO 132 may be taken concurrently or in a later semester, but the student will not have satisfied the SUNY-NS requirement until both BIO 132 and BIO 133 are successfully completed.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 134 - Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    3 Credits

    The study of the structure and function of cells (including metabolism), tissues, integument, and musculoskeletal, nervous, and sensory systems. Designed for students enrolled in the Dental Hygiene, Health Information Management, and Physical Education programs. Also open to interested Liberal Arts students with some biology background.

    Prerequisite: High school Biology with a grade of C or better, or any laboratory-based Biology course numbered 120 or higher with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 135 - Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    3 Credits

    A continuation of BIO 134. Includes the study of the structure and function of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.

    Prerequisite: BIO 134, or permission of instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 136 - Introductory Forensic Science

    4 Credits

    This is an introductory natural science course designed for the non-science, primarily criminal justice, major. The course will cover those biological and chemical fundamentals necessary for the student to understand topics of instrumentation and techniques employed in a crime laboratory. Topics such as matter, atomic theory, chemical bonding, chromatography, hair and fiber examination, blood and drug analysis, toxicology, and DNA typing will be included. The laboratory will include demonstrations and hands-on activities of methods used to study chemical and biological evidence. This course complements the existing CRJ 209 course which emphasizes the investigative procedures involved at the crime scene. A student may earn credit for BIO 136 or CHE 136, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses.

    Prerequisite:MCC LEVEL 6 MATHEMATICS PLACEMENT OR MTH 098 WITH A MINIMUM GRADE OF C

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 144 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    4 Credits

    The first course of a 2-semester comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include body organization, homeostasis, cells and tissues, integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and special senses. Laboratory study includes microscope work, substantial organ and animal dissection, and experiments designed to illustrate normal function and physiologic responses to specific stresses. Designed for students in Nursing, Radiologic Technology and other health related programs.

    A grade of C or better in a college biology course with lab (BIO 120, BIO 132/133, BIO 155) or a C or better in high school biology, in addition to a C or better in a college chemistry course (CHE 100, CHE 124, CHE 145, or CHE 151) or a C or better in high school chemistry.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 145 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    4 Credits

    A continuation of BIO 144 and the comprehensive study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic and immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, reproductive system, and fluid, electrolyte and acid/base balance. Laboratory study includes microscope work, substantial organ and animal dissection, and experiments designed to illustrate normal function and physiologic responses to specific stresses. Designed for students in Nursing, Radiologic Technology and other health-related programs.

    Prerequisite: BIO 144

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 148 - Fundamentals of Biology and Inheritance

    3 Credits

    Principles of biology with an emphasis on cellular structure and function, genetics and population genetics. Topics will include cellular metabolism, molecular genetics, gene expression, Mendelian genetics and population genetics. This course is an introductory biology course for science-interested students. This course may also fulfill a natural science elective for programs that do not require a laboratory science. Three class hours. (SUNY-NS)

    Prerequitie(s): High school biology with a grade of C or better, or BIO 120 with a grade of C or better, and high school chemistry with a grade of C or better, or any college chemistry course with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor.

    BIO 150 - Introduction to Biological Evolution

    3 Credits

    Introduction to the basic principles and concepts of the theory of evolution. Topics will include natural selection and other forces driving evolution, speciation, evolutionary genetics, hominid evolution, and major lines of evidence supporting the theory of evolution.

    MCC General Education: MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 155 - General Biology I

    4 Credits

    Principles of biology with an emphasis on cellular structure and function, and organic evolution. Topics will include cellular metabolism, molecular genetics, gene expression, Mendelian genetics, natural selection and speciation. The laboratory features activities and experiments that reinforce the concepts presented in lecture. This course is the first in a two-semester sequence in introductory biology for science majors or science-interested students. This course may also fulfill a natural science elective for science-interested students. WR

    Prerequisite: High school biology with a grade of B or better, or BIO 120 with a grade of C or better, and high school chemistry with a grade of C or better, or any college chemistry course with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    BIO 156 - General Biology II

    4 Credits

    Principles of biology with an emphasis on the diversity of life, the structure and function of plants and animals, and general ecological principles. The laboratory features activities and experiments that reinforce the concepts presented in lecture. This course is the second in a two-semester sequence in introductory biology for science majors or science-interested students. This course may also fulfill a natural science elective for science-interested students. WR

    Prerequisite: BIO 155 with a grade of C- or higher.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    BIO 195 - Field Studies in Biology

    Variable Credit

    This course is designed for students who wish to study a particular natural habitat or environment in a focused, hands-on, field setting. The majority of course work is completed in the field at a local or distant location depending upon the title and focus of the course for a given semester. Students will conduct field observations, record data, participate in and design field experiments and construct a field notebook detailing all aspects of their field experience. Credit hours are variable depending upon the field experience offered. Additional fees for travel, lodging, food, and other field expenses may apply. (SUNY-NS)

    Prerequisite: One Biology lab course preferred. Permission of instructor required.

    BIO 202 - Microbiology

    4 Credits

    A one term course for health professionals. A brief introduction to principles of general microbiology with major emphasis on control of microorganisms by physical and chemical processes. Medical microbiology including pathogenicity and epidemiology of infectious diseases, and immunology.

    Prerequisites: BIO 134 or BIO 143 or BIO 144 or BIO 155 or permission of instructor.

    BIO 209 - General Microbiology

    4 Credits

    A survey of microorganisms: bacteria, viruses, rickettsia, protozoa, algae and fungi. Major emphasis is placed upon bacteria: classification, genetics, ecology, morphology, physiology, physical and chemical control and economic importance. An introduction to applications of microbiology to food and water analysis, industry and medicine, including principles of immunology and transmission of infectious diseases. This course is designed for the Liberal Arts or science-interested student.

    Prerequisites: BIO 156 as prerequisite or corequisite, and CHE 145 or CHE 151 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor. Students who have completed BIO 156 with a grade below C- are advised to repeat BIO 156 before attempting BIO 209.

    BIO 217 - Nutrition

    3 Credits

    The study of nutrients needed for healthy functioning of human beings and the biochemical functions of these nutrients in the body. The nutrient content of foods and its application to meal planning. Special nutritional needs of infants, pregnant women, nursing mothers and the elderly. The course is designed for students in Nursing, Dental Hygiene, Radiologic Technology, and other Health Related Programs.

    Prerequisite: BIO 135 or BIO 143 or BIO 145 or permission of instructor.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    BIO 221 - Principles of Biochemistry

    4 Credits

    A study of the major chemical constituents of cells including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Structure and function will be emphasized. Enzyme kinetics, regulation of enzyme activity, and metabolic pathways will also be covered. Laboratory activities include isolation of biological molecules from different biological samples using a variety of common biochemistry techniques with subsequent analysis and characterization.

    Prerequisites: BIO 156 with a grade of C- or better, and CHE 151 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor.

    BIO 225 - Bioanalytical Techniques I

    4 Credits

    An introduction to the principles and methods of analytical technique as they relate to quantitative measures of determination. Laboratory experiments include instruction in the use of balances and volumetrics, spectrophotometric analysis, and a variety of titrimetric methods.

    Prerequisite: CHE 151 or permission of instructor.

    BIO 226 - Bioanalytical Techniques II

    4 Credits

    An in-depth study of the theory and practice of separation techniques that would be employed in the isolation and purification of biomolecules such as proteins, enzymes, and nucleic acids. Laboratory experiments involve immunology, chromatography, electrophoresis, and blotting techniques (western and southern blots).

    Prerequisite: BIO 156 with a grade of C- or better or BIO 225, or permission of instructor.

    BIO 227 - Biotechnology Seminar

    1 Credit

    A discussion based capstone course that will integrate the topics and concepts of the Biotechnology Program. Emphasis will be on applications of biotechnology, current issues, societal/ethical concerns, and laboratory management.

    BIO 230 - Molecular Genetics

    4 Credits

    A study of the transmission of genetic information with emphasis on the structure and function of nucleic acids. The genetics of prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses will be covered. The molecular basis of replication, repair, recombination, and gene expression will also be examined. Lab experiments introduce a variety of molecular biology techniques such as replica plating, bacterial conjugation and transformation, the isolation and restriction enzyme cleavage of plasmid DNA, and restriction mapping.

    Prerequisites: BIO 156 with a grade of C- or better and CHE 151 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor.

    BIO 235 - Pathophysiology

    3 Credits

    An introductory course for students in health related disciplines designed to facilitate further learning in their areas of specialization and promote effective interactions as members of the health care team. The course provides an overview of human diseases, their frequency, significance, diagnosis and treatment. The course moves from basic pathological processes to diseases by organs or organ systems to multiple system diseases and associated processes.

    Prerequisites: BIO 135, or BIO 143, or BIO 145 or permission of instructor

    BIO 242 - Human Dissection

    1 Credit

    For students in programs leading to a degree in an allied health field. Careful dissection of the human body by students under faculty supervision will be used to reinforce and enrich the student's study of anatomy. Students gain experience in making educated decisions concerning the dissection, as well as in dissection technique and identification of human anatomical structures.

    Prerequisite: BIO 142 and permission of the instructor.

    BIO 260 - General Ecology

    4 Credits

    An introduction to the interactions between living organisms and their physical, chemical and biological environment. Several levels of ecological organization are examined. These include the study of different types of populations, communities and ecosystems. Topics include population structure and growth, species interaction, energy flow, nutrient cycling, succession, and applications to current environmental management issues. Students perform ecological experiments in the field as well as in the laboratory. Two class hours, one conference hour, three laboratory hours.

    Prerequisite: BIO 155 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor.

    BIO 265 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

    4 Credits

    A study of vertebrate structure, function and evolution. Relationships between the structural and functional adaptations of the different vertebrate groups and their environment are examined. The laboratory features dissections and experiments that illustrate these adaptations in both aquatic and terrestrial vertebrates.

    Prerequisite: BIO 156 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of instructor.

    BIO 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson for more information on Independent Study courses.

BUS - Business

    BUS 104 - Introduction to Business

    3 Credits

    An introductory study of business including organizational forms, the function of production, finance, marketing and human resources. Additional topics will be environmental factors which impact business such as government business ethics and current business issues.

    BUS 110 - Entrepreneurial Studies I

    3 Credits

    First of two small business courses designed for those interested in learning how to start and manage a small business. It begins by defining and explaining the nature of small business in today's economy and entrepreneurs in the context of the free enterprise system. The topics include small business opportunities, legal forms of ownership, franchising, starting a new venture, sources of financing, developing marketing strategies and human resource management. Students will also learn the key components of a business plan, review case studies, and undertake a major project.

    BUS 135 - Supervising for the 21st Century

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to teach supervisors the concepts and skills they need to manage work and lead people in a diverse workforce. Its emphasis is on planning, problem-solving, communication, decision making, and employee motivation skills through the practical application of these concepts. It includes practice in hiring, training, performance appraisal, meetings, time management, and compliance with government regulations for equal opportunity, safety, and health.

    BUS 201 - Business Law I

    3 Credits

    A study of legal principles applied to business transactions. Topics covered include: contracts, criminal law and business, business torts, court systems, and commercial paper. This course is required for A.S. students in Business Administration and A.S. students in International Business.

    BUS 202 - Business Law II

    3 Credits

    A continuation of BUS 201 of the study of legal principles applied to business transactions. Topics covered include: corporations, limited liability companies, partnerships, agency, franchises, bankruptcy, real property, personal property, sales, and secured transactions.

    BUS 204 - Management: Theory and Practice

    3 Credits

    A study of the theories and practices that are used in the organization and management of profit and non-profit business and institutions. Topics will include planning, decision making, organizing, staffing, leading and controlling.

    Prerequisite: BUS 104 with a grade of C or higher

    BUS 207 - Human Resources Management

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the principles, practices, and techniques used in the development and implementation of an effective Human Resources/Personnel Management program. The course includes a discussion of employment, training, compensation, labor relations, health and safety and federal laws governing human resource management.

    BUS 208 - Organizational Behavior

    3 Credits

    Organizational behavior provides a conceptual and experiential basis for motivating and coordinating people to manage change in organizations. This course is intended for those who want to develop the tools for understanding, analyzing and changing the work behaviors of individuals and groups in an increasingly diverse workforce. It will use a combination of exercises, self-assessment techniques, cases and role plays to develop insights that facilitate self-knowledge and teamwork in a dynamic global environment.

    Prerequisite: BUS 104 with a C or higher

    BUS 210 - Entrepreneurial Studies II

    3 Credits

    Second of two courses designed for those interested in learning how to start and manage a small business. It builds on the preceding course concerning the establishment of the small business and deals with management of the on-going venture. This course takes a functional approach to managing the small business through a discussion of more advanced topics including entrepreneurial characteristics, financial planning and control, business operations, risk management, regulations, business valuation and succession issues, and other current topics. Students will develop a business plan. Course offered during the Spring only during the evening.

    Prerequisite: BUS 110 with a grade of C or higher, or permission of the instructor.

    BUS 220 - Applied Business Applications

    3 Credits

    A case study approach to the use of office productivity software to solve business problems and manage business processes. Emphasis will be on the use of spreadsheet and database applications to analyze data. Word processing and presentation software will be used to document and present solutions. Several major projects will be assigned to be completed outside of class. Students will integrate skills from all four applications to develop and present a business proposal based on a business case study. Additional course topics include file management, an introduction to major computer hardware components, system and application software, and network technologies. This course requires the use of the Windows version of Microsoft Office, including Microsoft Access, which is not available for the Macintosh version of Office.

    Prerequisite: BUS 104 with a grade of C or higher

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    BUS 250 - International Management and Marketing

    3 Credits

    This seminar has been designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop knowledge and understanding of the processes, procedures and challenges that arise in conducting business across national borders. Representatives from business or government involved in international trade will be invited to present information and conduct a discussion in various areas of international business expertise. This course is intended for students who are in the last semester of the degree program.

    Prerequisites: BUS 104, MAR 200, ECO 111, ECO 112, ACC 101, ENG 101, Three credits of foreign language, SOC 150 and GEG 211 or permission of instructor. SOC 150 and GEG 211 can be taken concurrently. Students in business programs other than International Business are not required to have the foreign language, SOC 150 and GEG 211 prerequisites for this course. Please contact the course instructor or department chair before registering for the course to discuss course expectations..

    BUS 275 - Business Cooperative Education

    4 Credits

    This experiential education course provides the student with an opportunity to apply their academic learning in an appropriate co-op or internship experience. Students work a minimum of 90* hours throughout the semester in a career-related position, while also participating in coursework intended to support the job experience. Students may access the resources of the Office of Career Services to help them secure a suitable position. This course is for students in the Accounting, Entrepreneurial Studies, and Computer Information Systems A.A.S. degree programs and is intended to be taken during the student’s final semester before graduation.

    *The work hour requirement is current as of publication of this catalog.

    Prerequisite(s): A minimum of 45 credit hours earned toward an Accounting, Entrepreneurial Studies, or Computer Information Systems A.A.S. degree with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher AND a review of job placement by the Office of Career Services. The student’s enrollment into the course is processed by the Office of Career Services.

    BUS 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

CDL - Interdisciplinary

    CDL 100 - Career Development and Life Planning

    1 Credit

    This course introduces students to the elements of career decision making with emphasis on the process of career and life planning. It is designed for students who are interested in learning more about themselves and their career choices. Whether you are undecided about your career, making a career change or exploring your career options, this course will help you become more self aware and provide you with a foundation to build your career path. Includes a writing component related to personal experience.

    Prerequisite/Corequisite: TRS 105 recommended.

    CDL 110 - Career and Life Planning for Undeclared Students

    2 Credits

    This experiential course introduces students to the elements of career decision-making with emphasis on the process of career and life planning. It is designed for students who are interested in learning more about themselves and their career choices. The career development needs of undeclared students will be emphasized through a multi-phase approach including self-exploration, decision-making strategies, career exploration, career counseling, and career planning. Career forums featuring professionals from various career areas will be included.

    CDL 115 - Job Search Strategies

    1 Credit

    A comprehensive job search strategies course involving skills assessment, resume and cover letter development, networking, interviewing techniques, employment applications, and the use of Internet resources for research and the job search process.

    Prerequisite: ENG 101

CE - Cooperative Education-Disney World

    CE 255 - Cooperative Education-Disney World

    6 Credits

    This course teaches students how to market skills such as communication, customer service, problem solving, conflict resolution, decision making, self-management, and creative thinking. Key elements of the course include the development of a 30-second commercial, cover letter, resume, and networking strategy. The students will also learn interviewing and negotiation techniques.

CE - Hospitality

    CE 260 - Cooperative Education-Hospitality Management

    4 Credits

    Students who work or desire to work, either full time or part time at jobs related to their college major or career interests are eligible for Cooperative Education. Students take a career-related classroom seminar (2 hours per week on campus or online) while working at a job (180 hours per semester) in the area of hospitality management. Successful completion of the seminar, and a minimum of 180 hours of work experience in any one semester, entitles a student to receive four credit hours. The Experiential and Adult Learning Office, located in Rm. 3-108E, will assist in obtaining jobs. A student's present job may qualify. Appropriate work experience must be approved by the instructor. Individuals must have completed 24 credit hours, with a 2.0 GPA. Exceptions permitted with permission from the instructor.

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

CEL - Leadership

    CEL 200 - General Internship

    3 Credits

    Designed to give a student the opportunity to test his or her career choice by working off campus either in a for-profit or not-for-profit organization. Having studied theories and principles in previous course work, the intern is able to use the knowledge gained in an actual work environment. Concurrently with the work experience, students are required to attend a series of seminars where they will deal with problems and issues related to their work experience. Students will be responsible for working a minimum of nine hours a week throughout the semester (15 weeks). The program is intended to serve students who have completed at least 24 credit hours of college work (including sufficient hours in their major to make them employable) and have at least a 2.5 GPA.

    Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA and Permission of the Experiential and Adult Learning Office.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

CHE - Chemistry

    CHE 100 - Preparatory Chemistry

    4 Credits

    This course meets the pre-admission chemistry requirement for selected health related programs. It is also recommended to students with limited mathematics and/or science background who plan to take higher level chemistry courses such as [CHE 121] CHE 124 or 145. Topics include dimensional analysis, atomic structure, nomenclature, bonding, reactions, chemical calculations, periodicity, states of matter, solutions, acids, bases, and the pH concept.

    Prerequisite: MCC level 6 Mathematics placement or MTH 098 with a minimum grade of C or MTH 099 with a minimum grade of C.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    CHE 110 - The Chemistry of Indulgence

    3 Credits

    Designed for non-science majors, this course does not require a background in chemistry or math. This class provides an integrated laboratory/lecture experience as students explore various principles of chemistry using everyday contexts such as food.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    CHE 115 - Special Topics in Chemistry

    Variable Credit

    This course is intended to address specific topics of interest in chemistry. Polymer Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Instrumentation/Spectroscopy, and Environmental Chemistry are a few examples of possible course offerings. Subject matter may change from semester to semester based on faculty and student interest. Primarily lecture format, but a laboratory component may be included. 1-4 credits.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 098 WITH A GRADE OF C OR BETTER OR MATHEMATICS PLACEMENT AT LEVEL 6.

    CHE 124 - General, Organic, and Biochemistry

    4 Credits

    This course is an introduction to the principles of general, organic, and biological chemistry that are relevant to students interested in a health related profession. A strong knowledge base of general chemistry is necessary in order for the student to be successful in CHE 124. See prerequisites below. Students are expected to be familiar with concepts such as: significant figures, dimensional analysis, ionic compounds, molecular geometry, polarity, the mole concept, and stoichiometry prior to taking CHE 124. Topics for CHE 124 include: measurement; dimensional analysis; chemical compounds and their bonds; redox reactions and energetics of chemical reactions; gases; solutions; acids and bases; nuclear chemistry; structural formulas, chemical and physical properties of organic compounds, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and metabolism.

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 100 or high school Chemistry with a minimum grade of C; and MCC level 6 Mathematics Placement or MTH 098 with a minimum grade of C or MTH 099 with a minimum grade of C.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    CHE 136 - Introductory Forensic Science

    4 Credits

    This is an introductory natural science course designed for the non-science, primarily criminal justice, major. The course will cover those biological and chemical fundamentals necessary for the student to understand topics of instrumentation and techniques employed in a crime laboratory. Topics such as matter, atomic theory, chemical bonding, chromatography, hair and fiber examination, blood and drug analysis, toxicology, and DNA typing will be included. The laboratory will include demonstrations and hands-on activities of methods used to study chemical and biological evidence. This course complements the existing CRJ 209 course which emphasizes the investigative procedures involved at the crime scene. A student may earn credit for CHE 136 or BIO 136, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses.

    Prerequisite: MCC Level 6 Mathematics placement or MTH 098 with a minimum grade of C.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    CHE 145 - Preparation for General College Chemistry

    4 Credits

    This course should be taken prior to CHE 151 by students who fall into one of the following categories provided they have adequate mathematics preparation (see prerequisite and recommendation below): (a) students with no previous background in chemistry, (b) students with an average or below average background in high school chemistry, or (c) students in need of a review of basic chemical problem solving skills. Topics include problem solving using the factor-label method, dimensional analysis, linear relationships, graphing, and significant figures; the atomic mass system and the mole concept; chemical formulae and inorganic nomenclature; basic chemical reactions, balancing equations, reaction stoichiometry, and limiting reagent problems; atomic structure and the principles of chemical bonding; solution concentrations and stoichiometry.

    Prerequisite: MCC level 8 Mathematics placement or MTH 104 with a minimum grade of C. Completion of or concurrent registration in MTH 165 is strongly recommended.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    CHE 151 - General College Chemistry I

    4 Credits

    This is the first semester of college chemistry and is appropriate for students interested in pursuing further studies in science or engineering. It is a mathematical approach to the principles of chemistry and assumes that students have had an above average preparation in chemistry. Topics include a brief review of problem solving using dimensional analysis, graphing, and significant figures; chemical stoichiometry; gas laws; thermochemistry; an in-depth treatment of atomic structure, periodicity, and chemical bonding; phase relationships.

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 145 with a minimum grade of C or Chemistry Regents exam grade of 70 or higher (or equivalent for students who did not attend New York State Public School); and MCC level 9 Mathematics placement or MTH 165 with a minimum grade of C.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    CHE 152 - General College Chemistry II

    4 Credits

    A continuation of CHE 151. Topics include: solution concentrations and properties; chemical kinetics; gas and solution phase chemical equilibrium including solubility; acids; and bases; thermodynamics; electrochemistry.

    Prerequisite: CHE 151 with a minimum grade of C-.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    CHE 251 - Organic Chemistry I

    5 Credits

    A modern treatment of organic chemistry which integrates fact and theory. The study of structure and its relation to properties, reactions, and reaction mechanisms is emphasized. Both aliphatic and aromatic compounds are studied in the first semester along with an introduction to stereochemistry and conformational analysis. The laboratory experiences include syntheses of a variety of organic compounds with an emphasis on basic laboratory techniques. The fundamental techniques of infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography are also introduced.

    Prerequisite: CHE 152 with a grade of C- or higher.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    CHE 252 - Organic Chemistry II

    5 Credits

    A continuation of the study of different classes of organic compounds. The interpretation of infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra is emphasized. The laboratory is a continuation of CHE 251 laboratory with an extensive introduction to qualitative organic analysis.

    Prerequisite: CHE 251 with a grade of C- or higher, or permission of instructor.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    CHE 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

CHI - Chinese/Foreign Language

    CHI 101 - Elementary Chinese I

    3 Credits

    Designed for students with little or no previous experience in the language. Focuses on communicative skills of listening comprehension and speaking, and in developing mastery of the Chinese writing system for basic reading and writing of simple sentences and short paragraphs. Pin yin and Chinese characters are taught so that students will be able to communicate both orally and in written form in the most essential everyday life situations. Students will also learn Chinese customs, traditions, and culture.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    CHI 102 - Elementary Chinese II

    3 Credits

    A continuation of CHI 101 with emphasis on basic language skills for communication and on cultural aspects to promote understanding and appreciation of the Chinese culture.

    Prerequisite: CHI 101, the equivalent or permission of the instructor. Memory and length of time since last studied are factors in successful placement.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    CHI 203 - Intermediate Chinese I

    3 Credits

    Continued study in Chinese for those with a firm foundation in elementary Chinese communication, written and oral. Grammar and vocabulary are continued at a higher level so that the student develops strong reading and writing skills in order to create complex sentences and short paragraphs. In this class, the student will attain oral and listening skills to successfully function in a variety of daily situations. Cultural topics are included in the study of grammar and structure. Memory and length of time since last studied are factors in successful placement.

    Prerequisite(s): CHI 102, or successful completion of equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

    CHI 221 - Chinese Culture on Location

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide the opportunity to see and experience the richness of China through the unique experience of travel. The core part of this course will be a stay in the country, with visits to the main cities and cultural centers. Class meetings prior to the trip will focus on topics that will help the student to prepare for the experience, and meetings after the trip will provide a time for debriefing, reporting, evaluation and assimilation. The student is expected to complete ten tasks during his/her stay, make an oral presentation, and prepare a portfolio of the trip. This portfolio can be a personal journal, photo display, video recording, or a combination thereof.

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

CIN - Cinema Studies

    CIN 120 - Introduction to Cinema

    3 Credits

    A survey of the development of motion pictures from 1896 to the present. Emphasis on prominent directors, film genres, stars, and techniques of silent and sound eras; screenings and analysis of selected films.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    CIN 121 - Cinema Comedy

    3 Credits

    A study of the key figures in motion picture history, and the films they made. Focus will be placed on the great directors, actors, producers and screenwriters of the comedy genre.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT)

    CIN 122 - Cinema Drama

    3 Credits

    A study of the key figures in motion picture history and the films they made. Focus will be placed on the great directors, actors, producers, and screenwriters of the dramatic cinema genre.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT)

    CIN 221 - The Movie Business

    3 Credits

    Movies are a mass medium that has evolved from two art forms: the theatre and photography. But almost from the very beginning, the movies became a commercial enterprise with movie-making following an assembly line model of production. In order to fully understand the movies, students must understand the business that shapes almost all aspects of the process. This course will provide an overview to the business aspects of the movie industry. Specifically, topics will include financing, domestic/global marketing, distribution and exhibition.

    Prerequisite: CIN 120

    CIN 222 - Topics in Cinema and Screen Studies

    3 Credits

    This course will vary each time it is offered. Examples of topics that may be taught are the examination of the independent film movement, race and gender in movies and television, international cinema, criticism of movies and television, delivery systems for the moving image, the documentary, film noir, and the movie star.

    Prerequisite: CIN 120 or permission of instructor.

    CIN 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

Cinema Studies
CIS - Computer Information Systems

    CIS 100 - Information Processing Fundamentals

    4 Credits

    This is an introductory course in digital computers and information processing concepts. The focus of this course will be on key components of information systems - people, software, hardware, data, and communication technologies, and how these components can be integrated and managed to create competitive advantage. Additional topics include computer terminology, networks, the Internet, numbering systems, working with operating systems that use graphical user interface (GUI) and command-line interface, algorithm and program development, pseudo code and flow charting. Students will develop professional communication skills while working in collaborative teams. Students will meet in a networked PC classroom for lab and will be assigned projects to be completed outside of class and laboratory time. Successful completion of this course with a grade of C or better is required for further progress in Computer Information Systems degree programs.

    Prerequisite: MTH 104 with a grade of C or better, or MCC level 8 mathematics placement.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    CIS 110 - A+ PC Repair and Operating Systems

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to prepare the student to support personal computers. Students build a desktop personal computer component by component, install and configure multimedia, networking, and mass storage devices, install and configure a connection to a local area network, develop hardware troubleshooting skills, learn how to troubleshoot Microsoft® Windows® operating system problems, and learn how to optimize the Windows operating system for improved performance. Students also install and work with a non-Windows operating system on the same personal computer. A student who completes this course will be eligible to sit for an A+ certification exam in PC maintenance and repair.

    Prerequisites: CIS 100 or CSC 101 or CPT 114, each with a grade of C or better.

    CIS 123 - A+ Guide to Computer Hardware: Technical Support

    3 Credits

    This course prepares students to take the CompTIA A+ 220-901 certification exam, which covers PC hardware and peripherals, mobile device hardware, networking and troubleshooting hardware and network connectivity issues. Students will assemble and disassemble personal computer hardware and peripherals to specification, and connect personal computers and mobile devices to network architectures. Students will configure small office home office (SOHO) multifunction devices and wireless routers, and troubleshoot common issues associated with the various hardware domains covered.

    One of the following with a grade of C or better: CIS 100, CSC 101, CPT 114, or CPT 101.

    CIS 124 - A+ Guide to Computer Software: Technical Support

    3 Credits

    This course prepares students to take the CompTIA A+ 220-902 certification exam, which covers installing and configuring operating systems including Windows, iOS, Android, Apple OS X and Linux. It also addresses security, the fundamentals of cloud computing, and operational procedures

    One of the following with a grade of C or better: CIS 100, CSC 101, CPT 114, or CPT 101.

    CIS 200 - Programming for Information Systems

    4 Credits

    This is a first course in object-oriented programming for the computer information systems student. Emphasis will be placed on problem analysis, documentation, and developing a program to meet given specifications. Topics include: classes and objects, properties and methods, variables, user-defined constants, explicit data type conversions, input validation and exception handling, calculations, sequence, selection, and repetition control structures, built-in and user-defined procedures with parameter passing, one-dimensional arrays, collections, sequential file processing, and database processing. Students will complete several coding assignments during class and lab to reinforce and apply concepts. Major programming projects will be assigned to be completed outside of lab and class.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 100 or CPT 114, either with a grade of C or higher.

    CIS 201 - Introduction to Web Site Programming and Design

    3 Credits

    This course will provide the student with an introduction to programming and design concepts used in developing a Web site. Topics include coding HTML, Cascading Style Sheets, accessibility, programming with JavaScript, multimedia and interactivity, search engine optimization, domain name and web host selection, file transfer protocols, and implementation on a server. Students will develop an interactive, multi page Web site as a portfolio project.

    Prerequisites: CIS 200, CSC 101, or CPT 101 with a grade of C or higher.

    CIS 209 - Systems Analysis and Design

    3 Credits

    A study of the skills required to perform the role of systems analyst. Emphasis will be placed on developing these systems analyst skills as they apply to the designing, developing and implementing business application software that runs on large mainframe to client-server systems. Topics include: project management tools, sampling and investigating hard data, questionnaires, observations, prototyping, developing UML diagrams to graphically depict a system, developing process specifications, designing effective input and output, developing an E-Commerce based business, database design with normalization, and designing effective user interfaces. Students are expected to work on a team project during the entire semester to develop and present a system proposal to the class.

    Prerequisite: CSC 101 or CIS 200 with a grade of C or better.

    CIS 211 - Applied Database Concepts

    3 Credits

    A sound introduction to database concepts with Microsoft Access. Emphasis will be on using Access to build and maintain relational databases. The student will create databases, queries, custom forms, and reports, use macros and modules using the Visual Basic for Applications for programming languages and SQL.

    Prerequisites: CSC 101 or CIS 200 with a grade of C or better

    CIS 221 - Applied Database Concepts with an Oracle Database

    3 Credits

    A sound introduction to database concepts using the database Oracle. Emphasis will be on using Oracle to build and maintain relational databases. The student will create databases, queries, custom forms and reports, and use PL/ SQL.

    Prerequisite: CSC 101 or CIS 200 with a grade of C or higher

    CIS 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

CIT - Civil and Construction Technology

    CIT 101 - Surveying

    4 Credits

    An introduction to plane surveying techniques, including distance measurement, note keeping, leveling, angle measurement, care and use of instruments, traversing, stadia, topographic surveys, and mapping.

    Prerequisite/corequisite: MTH 135

    CIT 112 - CAD for Construction

    2 Credits

    Applications in this course will include roof truss, concrete and steel reinforcing, welding, site plans, contour lines, property lines, DOT highway plans, piping plans, and bridge plans.

    CIT 122 - Construction I: Elements of Building Construction

    4 Credits

    The study of the materials, methods and techniques used in building construction projects. The course will cover the construction process from idea conception to project closeout, including building and material codes, materials and methods, material quantity surveys, and construction procedures. Primary emphasis will be on structural steel, reinforced concrete, masonry, wood, and combined structural systems. Also included will be building exterior and interior finishing systems. The laboratory includes a study of the methods and techniques used in blueprint reading for building construction. It will cover the use of construction drawings, scales, orthographic views, symbols, sections, and graphical interpretation, specific to the building construction industry to include structural steel detailing, reinforced concrete detailing, masonry sections, wood sections, and schedules for interior finishes and accessories.

    Prerequisite/corequisite: MTH 135

    CIT 123 - Construction II: Heavy, Highway and Site Construction

    4 Credits

    The study of the materials, methods and techniques used in site work, highway, utility, and other heavy construction projects. The primary emphasis is construction equipment selection, production calculations, and material handling. Topics will include site layout, aggregates and soils classifications, earthmoving basics, cranes and lifting equipment, concrete and asphalt production and paving. The study of the methods and techniques used in blueprint reading for heavy, highway, and site construction. The laboratory will cover the use of construction drawings, scales, orthographic views, symbols, sections, and graphical interpretation, specific to the heavy and highway construction industry to include topographic maps, profiles, engineering scales, and cross sections.

    Prerequisite: CIT 122 or permission of instructor.

    CIT 202 - Route Surveying

    4 Credits

    Horizontal and vertical curves, spirals, sight distance, staking out a highway. Earthwork including cross-sections, areas, volumes, borrow pits.

    Prerequisite: CIT 101.

    CIT 204 - Strength of Materials

    3 Credits

    Study of stress, strain, bolted, riveted and welded joints, centriods, shear, moments, designing of beams and columns. Demonstrations by instructor and some tests performed by students on various materials such as steel, timber, cast iron and aluminum.

    Prerequisite: MET 203

    CIT 205 - Structural Design

    4 Credits

    Design, investigation, and crafting of elementary reinforced concrete and structural steel members including rectangular beams, T-beams, columns, foundations, retaining walls, prestressed concrete, steel plate girders and columns, welded and bolted connections.

    Prerequisite: CIT 204.

    CIT 206 - Soil and Concrete Testing

    4 Credits

    The study and laboratory testing of soils and concrete. Topics include the nature of soils, soil testing, plain concrete, asphalt concrete, and aggregates. The laboratory covers field and lab tests including soil and aggregate graduation, specific gravity, soil compaction, soil liquid limit and plastic limit, soils shear, concrete proportioning, slump, air content, compression testing and inspection.

    CIT 210 - Highway Technology

    3 Credits

    Fundamental principles and processes in the practice of highway engineering. Study of highway structure, materials of construction, and methods of construction and maintenance.

    CIT 217 - Construction Management

    4 Credits

    An introduction to basic construction management and organization. Topics include project organization, staffing, labor relations, planning, critical path scheduling, integrated job cost control, production control, and job site safety.

    Prerequisites: CIT 122, 123; prerequisites/corequisites: CIT 221, 232

    CIT 221 - Cost Estimating

    3 Credits

    An introduction to cost estimating of a construction project. Topics include generating preliminary cost estimates from early phase design drawings and specifications, and estimating techniques used to prepare a final bid for a project, including quantity take offs, material pricing, and labor costs.

    CIT 232 - Construction Contracts and Specifications

    2 Credits

    This course will cover the application of the construction contracts, drawings, and specifications to the construction process. It will cover the role construction documents play as a communication tool for understanding the roles and responsibility of the construction parties. It will follow both the CSI (Construction Specification Institute) and the NYSDOT (New York State Department of Transportation) formats.

    Prerequisites: CIT 122, CIT 123 or permission of instructor; corequisite: CIT 217.

    CIT 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

CLT - Clinical Laboratory Technician

    CLT 100 - Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology

    2 Credits

    This course is an overview of the Health Care System with an emphasis on the profession of Medical Laboratory Technology. The course covers the training and continuing education of Health Care workers and outlines the roles Clinical Laboratory Technicians/Medical Laboratory Technicians play as part of the health care team. The student will describe the history and current practices relative to education, governance and common practice in the clinical laboratory field. The student will be able to discuss and demonstrate safety, values, ethics and interpersonal interactions as related to Laboratory Science. Two class hours.

    CLT 110 - Specimen Procurement and Processing

    1 Credit

    This course is an introduction to the collection and processing of patient specimens for clinical laboratory testing. The primary emphasis is venipuncture technique and its importance in sample quality. Other topics include communication skills, quality assurance, safety and infection control procedures, applicable medical terminology, capillary blood collection, collection of specimens other than blood, and specimen handling.

    Prerequisite: CLT 100 and any one of BIO 134, BIO 142, BIO 144; or permission of instructor.

    CLT 130 - Body Fluids and Urinalysis

    2 Credits

    This course is the study of the structure and function of the processes which result in urine and body fluid production. The emphasis of the course will be on analysis and interpretation of test results and will include pathophysiological correlations to the test results. Topics will include urinalysis, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, serous fluid analysis, analysis of transudates, exudates and gastrointestinal contents and semen analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): CLT 100 with a grade of C or higher AND any one of BIO 134, BIO 142, BIO 144 each with a grade of C or higher; or permission of instructor. Co-requisite(s): Any one of BIO 135, BIO 143, BIO 145 (or previously completed)

    CLT 140 - Immunology

    2 Credits

    An introduction to basic concepts in immunology. Topics include classification systems of the immune system. Functions and interactions of each component of the immune subsystems. Mechanisms of action of each active component of the immune subsystems. Detailed analysis of the development of the immune system, specific immunoglobulin structures, functions and genetics, complement and other cascades and the major histocompatibility complex will be covered. Disorders discussed will include anergy, hypersensitivities, autoimmune diseases, allergies, immune deficiencies and AIDS.

    Prerequsite(s): CLT 100 with a grade of C or higher AND any one of BIO 134, BIO 142, BIO 144 each with a grade of C or higher; or permission of instructor. Co-requisite(s): CLT 145 AND any one of BIO 135, BIO 143, BIO 145 (or previously completed)

    CLT 145 - Serological Techniques

    1 Credit

    An introduction to the theory and practice of serological testing with emphasis on clinical significance and disease correlation. Topics include traditional techniques and molecular methods for detection and confirmation of disease states.

    Prerequisite(s): CLT 100 with a grade of C or higher AND any one of BIO 134, BIO 142, BIO 144 each with a grade of C or higher; or permission of instructor. Co-requisite(s): CLT 140 with a grade of C or higher AND any one of BIO 135, BIO 143, BIO 145 (or previously completed)

    CLT 150 - Histology Techniques

    1 Credit

    An introduction to histological techniques used in the clinical laboratory setting. Topics include tissue preparation, fixation, embedding, sectioning, mounting and staining to facilitate microscopic examination. The student will be required to identify common cellular and tissue structures and will be required to follow all laboratory and safety protocols.

    Prerequisite(s):CLT 100 with a grade of C or higher AND any one of BIO 135, BIO 143, BIO 145 each with a grade of C or higher; or permission of instructor

    CLT 203 - Diagnostic Microbiology

    2 Credits

    A comprehensive study of microorganisms of importance in human health and disease. Topics include the preanalytical collection and processing of clinical specimens as well as the analytical morphology, isolation, and identification of pathogens, with a focus on colonial, microscopic, biochemical and molecular characteristics and additionally the postanalytical interrelationships of microorganisms and human hosts and the correlation, prevention and control of infectious diseases. Bacteriology is emphasized but the course includes a survey of mycology, parasitology, and virology.

    Prerequisite: BIO 202 with a grade of C or higher, or permission of instructor.

    CLT 210 - Clinical Chemistry

    4 Credits

    An introduction to the concepts of Clinical Chemistry. Topics include basic laboratory math, the renal system, digestive system with liver function, respiratory system and the endocrine system. Emphasis is on clinical tests which evaluate the function of these systems. Analytes and lab results are correlated to normal homeostasis and disease. Analyte measurements are studied and described in reference to previously covered material such as metabolism, protein synthesis, acid-base balance, electrolyte balance, enzymes, and hormones. Laboratory work includes the theory, operation and maintenance of the specialized and semi- automated analytical instrumentation used to perform these tests.

    Prerequisite(s): CLT 110 with a grade of C or higher, CHE 145 or CHE 151 AND any one of BIO 135, BIO 143, BIO 145, both with a grade of C or higher; and MCC Level 9 Mathematics placement or MTH 165 with a grade of C or higher; or permission of instructor

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    CLT 220 - Immunohematology

    4 Credits

    An introduction to the field of practical Immunohematology and Blood Banking. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical knowledge of human genetics, blood groups, blood cell grouping, blood components, fractionation, storage and washing, transfusion therapies, transfusion reactions, and alloantibody and autoantibody formation. Additionally, good laboratory practices, neatness, organization, attention to detail and professionalism are revisited.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 135, BIO 148, CLT 110 and CLT 140 or permission of instructor

    CLT 230 - Hematology and Coagulation

    4 Credits

    A comprehensive study of the physiology of the normal hematopoietic system and the pathophysiology of an abnormal hematopoietic system and ramifications of these lesions in maintaining homeostasis. Emphasis is on the mechanics of test procedures, interpretation of hematology test results and correlation of the results with disease.

    Prerequisite: CLT 110 with grade of C or higher and any one of BIO 135, BIO 143, BIO 145 each with a grade of C or higher; or permission of instructor

    CLT 251 - Clinical Rotation I - Microbiology and Urinalysis

    2 Credits

    The Clinical Rotations are intended to expose the CLT students to a functioning lab in an integrated health care environment and to assure the students meet the CLT competencies as described in the CLT Student Handbook. As such, emphasis is placed on professional conduct and performance of procedures in accordance with protocols of the department.

    Under the supervision of laboratory personnel, students will demonstrate professional behavior, conduct routine procedures, develop their analytical skills and apply knowledge acquired in the program. Students will verify preanalytical specimen integrity, follow analytical laboratory protocols and demonstrate exceptional communication skills in the post analytical reporting of results. There are approximately six departments; Body Fluids/Urinalysis, Immunology/Serology, Microbiology, Clinical Chemistry, Blood Bank and Hematology. There are three rotational courses; CLT 251, 253 and 255. Therefore, on average a student will rotate through two departments per rotation.

    Prerequisite(s): CLT 203, CLT 210, CLT 220 and CLT 230 all with a grade of C or higher and permission of program director. Co-requisite: CLT 260

    CLT 253 - Clinical Rotation II - Hematology and Immunohematology

    2 Credits

    The Clinical Rotations are intended to expose the CLT students to a functioning lab in an integrated health care environment and to assure the students meet the CLT competencies as described in the CLT Student Handbook. As such, emphasis is placed on professional conduct and performance of procedures in accordance with protocols of the department.

    Under the supervision of laboratory personnel, students will demonstrate professional behavior, conduct routine procedures, develop their analytical skills and apply knowledge acquired in the program. Students will verify preanalytical specimen integrity, follow analytical laboratory protocols and demonstrate exceptional communication skills in the post analytical reporting of results. There are approximately six departments; Body Fluids/Urinalysis, Immunology/Serology, Microbiology, Clinical Chemistry, Blood Bank and Hematology. There are three rotational courses; CLT 251, 253 and 255. Therefore, on average a student will rotate through two departments per rotation.

    Prerequisite: CLT 203, CLT 210, CLT 220, and CLT 230 all with a grade of C or higher and permission of program director. Co-requisite: CLT 260

    CLT 255 - Clinical Rotation III - Chemistry, Immunology and Phlebotomy

    2 Credits

    The Clinical Rotations are intended to expose the CLT students to a functioning lab in an integrated health care environment and to assure the students meet the CLT competencies as described in the CLT Student Handbook. As such, emphasis is placed on professional conduct and performance of procedures in accordance with protocols of the department.

    Under the supervision of laboratory personnel, students will demonstrate professional behavior, conduct routine procedures, develop their analytical skills and apply knowledge acquired in the program. Students will verify preanalytical specimen integrity, follow analytical laboratory protocols and demonstrate exceptional communication skills in the post analytical reporting of results. There are approximately six departments; Body Fluids/Urinalysis, Immunology/Serology, Microbiology, Clinical Chemistry, Blood Bank and Hematology. There are three rotational courses; CLT 251, 253 and 255. Therefore, on average a student will rotate through two departments per rotation.

    Prerequisite(s): CLT 203, CLT 210, CLT 220, and CLT 230 all with a grade of C or higher and permission of program director. Co-requisite: CLT 260

    CLT 260 - Medical Laboratory Technology Seminar

    2 Credits

    A student focused discussion based course that is designed to integrate the topics and concepts of the Clinical Laboratory Technician Program. Emphasis will be on reflection of the Clinical rotation experience and the CLT Program in general. Job placement, NYS licensure application, and ASCP BOC exam preparation will also be addressed.

    CLT 203, CLT 210, CLT 220, and CLT 230 all with a grade of C or higher and permission of program director

    CLT 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

COM - Communication

    COM 101 - Introduction to Mass Media

    3 Credits

    An introduction to communication theory and practice, the history of mass media, and an examination of the business of the American mass media. Additional topics will include media support industries, such as advertising and public relations.

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    COM 109 - An Introduction to Public Relations

    3 Credits

    A survey of the roles and responsibilities of the public relations professional in private and public organizations. Examination of the importance of the audience and audience research in public relations program planning, how public relations differs from advertising and the use of traditional publicity tools like press releases and press kits to reach targeted audiences. Exploration of the use of the Internet to reach key stakeholders and its use as a distribution channel for publicity. Recognition of the importance of ethics, integrity and relationship building as a cornerstone of public relations.

    COM 115 - Computer Generated Images

    3 Credits

    This course presents introductory hands-on experiences in exploring the potential of multimedia computer software, special graphic effects and computer imaging techniques as a creative medium. The focus of the course is on exploring how computers and traditional photographic and video technologies are coming together as tools for creating unique graphic images.

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    COM 120 - Media Literacy

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the critical consumption of media. This course will focus on the ability to access, analyze, evaluate and communicate the process of creating and interpreting media in a variety of forms.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-IL - Information Literacy (MIL)

    COM 130 - Media Writing

    3 Credits

    Media writing explores the different styles of writing for print media, broadcast media, the Web, advertising copy, and public relations materials. Students will learn how to gather information, write for specific audiences, and check for accuracy. This course will also discuss the legal implications of writing for the media.

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 200

    Learning Attributes: WR

    COM 131 - Principles of Journalism

    3 Credits

    This course provides an overview of journalism principles and practices. Information covered includes discussion and interpretation of what is news, news reporting today, beat reporting, feature writing, and writing for the web. Students will learn to work alone and in teams to conduct interviews, find sources, and prepare news leads, news stories, and profiles. They will demonstrate their ability to write and edit balanced, accurate journalistic stories on deadline.

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 200

    COM 142 - Broadcast Performance

    3 Credits

    Practice in devising and participating in various kinds of radio and television performances, including news, sports, commercials, promotional announcements, and interviews.

    COM 150 - Video Production I

    3 Credits

    A combination lecture/lab course designed to introduce students to creating video productions on location. Emphasis is placed on the use of portable video cameras, as well as various lighting and audio equipment. Videographic skills will be developed through lab based productions.

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    COM 202 - Techniques of Television I

    3 Credits

    Introduction to the basic aspects of technical and production techniques of television and related audio systems used in the medium. Emphasis will be placed on theory and use of television equipment, direction, lighting, television graphics, scripting, basic engineering, distribution systems, and studio personnel. In addition to the student-produced and directed assignments, members of the class will participate in production crews.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    COM 203 - Compositing and Visual Effects

    3 Credits

    This intermediate course focuses on the study of live action video manipulation. Working with contemporary hardware and software, students will begin learning about and creating common audio and visual effects. The student will examine and explore historical uses of video effects to guide them in the creation of their own classroom projects.

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    COM 204 - Audio Production

    3 Credits

    An introductory exploration of audio productions techniques using digital audio editing tools as well as microphones and other audio sources. This course will cover production of audio projects as well as exercises using recording devices and digital editing software and new media technology.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    COM 211 - Practicum in Media I

    3 Credits

    A course designed to allow students to complete significant experiences within their discipline of study, including communication, art, music, and interior design. Students will be expected to spend a minimum of eight (8) hours per week in supervised contract learning situations. Students will work with the appropriate Visual and Performing Arts Department faculty member to identify, design, and complete contract learning opportunities.

    Prerequisite: Permission of a VaPA Department faculty member.

    COM 212 - Techniques of Television II

    3 Credits

    Advanced techniques in the technical and production aspects of television programming. Emphasis will be placed on studio and control room operation, engineering experience, program planning and organization production and direction of individual assignments. Experience and theory of video recording will be given. Principles of TV signal distribution will be discussed.

    Prerequisite: COM 202.

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    COM 230 - Scriptwriting

    3 Credits

    Review and practice of the requirements for writing professionally formatted scripts used in short and feature films. Emphasis will be placed on writing short-form scripts and analyzing and discussing long-form dramatic scripts.

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 or ENG 200.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT)

    COM 264 - Video Production II

    3 Credits

    An intermediate course that provides a continuation of the principles learned and practiced in Video Production I (COM 150) as they relate to camera operation. The student will add to their skills through advanced techniques in image acquisition with increased emphasis on editing of live-action video footage. Working with contemporary non-linear editing systems, the emphasis will be placed on the structure and pacing of a finished video project.

    Prerequisite: COM 150.

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    COM 267 - Video Editing

    3 Credits

    Students will be concentrating on advanced tools and techniques used to make high quality video clips and sound tracks. This will involve working with non-linear editing software such as Avid Xpress Pro. Real-time video editing, waveform sound editing and other methods of audio/video production will be stressed.

    Prerequisite(s): COM 150 or permission of instructor.

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    COM 270 - Media and Society

    3 Credits

    An examination and analysis of American mass media and the forces that influence them. Emphasis will be placed upon basic legal principles, the role of government in attempting to regulate the media, and the media's influence on our society.

    Prerequisites: COM 101

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

COS - College Success

    COS 100 - Nursing Orientation Seminar

    1 Credit

    This course focuses on assisting the nursing student to acquire essential skills, techniques and behaviors that will lead to success as a student, a lifelong learner and a beginning member of the nursing profession.

    COS 101 - College Orientation

    1 Credit

    COS 101 provides essential information about the College in a concise one-credit course. Topics include campus resources and activities, First Year Experience events, MCC technology, goal setting, time management, and college policies. Students will leave this course more informed and prepared for their college experience.
    A student who has earned a passing grade for COS 101 cannot later earn credit for COS 133. 1 Credit.

    COS 133 - College Orientation and Success Strategies

    3 Credits

    COS 133 will enable students to transition successfully into the college environment by incorporating strategies designed to build skills and promote habits of mind that will sustain them throughout their lives and careers. Students will learn how to set goals, manage time, solve academic problems, learn and study in college, use MCC technology, and participate in First Year Experience events. By becoming informed and vested members of the College community, students will be able to self-advocate, access resources, establish relationships, critically think, and ultimately develop a strong work ethic for personal and academic success. Students will leave this course with the ability to make informed choices and with a clearer sense of their purpose, meaning, and direction. A student who has earned a passing grade for COS 133 cannot later earn credit for COS 101.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    COS 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

CPT - Computer Technology

    CPT 101 - Programming in Python

    4 Credits

    A gentle introduction to basic programming concepts using Python. Python is a high-level, interpreted object oriented programming language with built in data structures and dynamic data typing. This results in programs that are typically much shorter than programs written in Java or C++. Python’s built in debugger allows the developer to inspect variables, set breakpoints and evaluate expressions in real-time. The underlying C and Java like structure and modularity allow for easy integration or linkage to existing programs in these languages. The combined features of Python are well suited for rapid program development leading to enhanced productivity. Practical applications of Python may be found in the prominent fields of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics. This course utilizes an electronic-classroom setting to introduce the beginner or curious programmer to Python and basic programming concepts through a series of practical hands-on exercises interlaced with the discussion material.

    MTH 104 with a grade of C or better, or MCC level 8 mathematics placement.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    CPT 114 - Problem Solving and Robotics

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to develop and/or enhance practical problem solving skills and apply these skills to Robotics. Challenging exercises and robotics projects are designed to foster critical thinking that is particularly useful to students interested in the engineering, computational and networking disciplines. The course focuses on the analysis, design and implementation phases in developing a complete solution to a given problem. Major concepts discussed include algorithm development,number systems conversions, logic flow diagram development, and solution testing. Appropriate use of data types, conditional selection, repetitive, and iterative solutions are emphasized throughout the course. A data flow programming approach using LabView is utilized extensively throughout the course to implement and test concepts. Projects make use of the exciting and challenging Lego Mindstorms Robotics system to create real-life applications that build on the skills developed throughout the course.

    Prerequisite: MTH 104 with a grade of C, or higher level Algebra course

    CPT 115 - Introduction to Networks

    3 Credits

    This course corresponds to the first semester of the Cisco Networking Academy Exploration track. It introduces students to the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. It uses the OSI and TCP layered models to examine the nature and roles of protocols and services at the application, network, data link, and physical layers. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for further studies in computer networking. Hands-on labs for this course use a “model Internet” to allow students to analyze real data without affecting production networks. At the end of the course, students build simple LAN topologies by applying basic principles of cabling, performing basic configurations of network devices such as routers and switches, and implementing IP addressing schemes.

    CPT 120 - Introduction to Cybersecurity

    4 Credits

    Designed for students with no security experience or background, this course will cover basic terminology and concepts. Included will be the basics of computers and networking such as Internet Protocol, routing, Domain Name Service, and network devices. This course will introduce students to the basics of cryptography, security management, wireless networking, and organizational policy. Topics will include: an overview of the information security framework, network infrastructure security, security and cryptography, information security policy, and defense in depth. Other topics covered in this course include: basic security terminology and professional terms, network basics, tracert, nslookup, ipconfig, ping, DNS, DoS attacks, overview of malware, rules for avoiding viruses and vulnerabilities.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    CPT 125 - Physical Security

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the design and implementation of network physical security policies and mechanisms. Physical security is the protection of personnel, hardware, programs, networks, and data from physical circumstances and events that could cause serious losses or damage to an enterprise, agency, or institution. This includes protection from fire, natural disasters, burglary, theft, vandalism, and terrorism.

    CPT 210 - Operating Systems and Peripherals

    3 Credits

    Fundamental multitasking/multi-user operating system concepts, as applicable to modern day computer systems, are studied. Major topics include priority boosting, priority and round robin scheduling, virtual memory management, paging, mapping, swapping, and process management. Applications that interface to the outside world via the PC's external I/O ports are examined in the laboratory. Emphasis is placed on developing simple "device drivers" using a combination of low and high level language tools.

    Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in CIS 200, CSC 101 or CPT 101.

    CPT 211 - Android App Design for Mobile Devices

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the design and implementation of mobile applications using the Android computing platform. Students will utilize standard software development techniques, including the use of an integrated development environment and software development kits, to build mobile applications. The applications will include capture and processing of data from the integrated sensors found in a typical mobile device.

    Prerequisite(s): CSC 101 or CPT 101 or CIS 101

    CPT 212 - Wireless and Remote Sensor Technology

    3 Credits

    This course introduces the student to concepts employed in the wireless acquisition of data from remote sensors found on airborne devices such as aircraft, spacecrafts, and satellites as well as from sensors integrated into common commercially available medical devices, tablets and smartphones. The use of remote sensors involves the acquisition of information on an object, phenomenon or an environment with minimum physical contact. In practice this is achieved by acquiring information from sensors that are responsive to environmental elements, which may be atmospheric (air pressure, vibration, humidity) or electromagnetic radiation that may be in the form of invisible (heat) or visible radiation. Students will explore various applications of sensors in a laboratory setting, apply their knowledge of digital electronics, networking and programming and gain experience integrating commercially available electro-optical, magnetic and environmental sensors into a practical wireless application.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 165, ENR 157, CSC 202 all with a grade of C or better.

    CPT 213 - Computer Systems Design Lab

    1 Credit

    Students will work in teams to solve an application and/or design problem selected from an intercollegiate design challenge or a student proposal approved by the instructor. The students will design and build a working prototype, create a design report, and make an oral presentation. Each student will be required to maintain a weekly ledger in the form of a lab book that details work performed and progress that is periodically reviewed and graded by the instructor.

    Prerequisite: CSC 202

    CPT 215 - Routing Fundamentals

    3 Credits

    This course corresponds to the second semester of the Cisco Networking Academy Exploration track. It describes the architecture, components, and operation of routers, and explains the principles of routing and routing protocols. Students analyze, configure, verify, and troubleshoot the primary routing protocols RIPv1, RIPv2, EIGRP, and OSPF. By the end of this course, students will be able to recognize and correct common routing issues and problems.

    Prerequisites: CPT 115 with a grade of C or better.

    CPT 216 - Advanced Networking Concepts

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on securing local and wide area networks from the network administrator and an outside point of view. With successful completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of how outsiders attack networks and how to prevent these attacks from being successful. Students will also have a thorough understanding of current technologies that run over LANs and WANs and demand robust security. These technologies will be covered in depth throughout this course.

    Prerequisite: CPT 215 with a grade of C or better.

    CPT 217 - LAN Switching

    3 Credits

    This course corresponds to the third semester of the Cisco Networking Academy Exploration track and provides a comprehensive, theoretical, and practical approach to learning the technologies and protocols needed to design and implement a converged switched network. Students learn about the hierarchical network design model and how to select devices for each layer.

    The course explains how to configure a switch for basic functionality and how to implement Virtual LANs (VLAN), VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP), and Inter-VLAN routing in a converged network. The different implementations of Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) in a converged network are presented, and students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to implement a wireless local-area network (WLAN) in a small-to-medium network.

    Prerequisite: CPT 215

    CPT 218 - WAN Systems

    3 Credits

    This course corresponds to the fourth semester of the Cisco Networking Academy Exploration track. It explores the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in enterprise networks. The course uses the Cisco Network Architecture to introduce integrated network services and explains how to select the appropriate devices and technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to implement and configure common data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of traffic, access control, and addressing services. Finally, students learn how to detect, troubleshoot, and correct common enterprise network implementation issues.

    Prerequisite: CPT 217

    CPT 220 - Applied Computer Security Concepts

    4 Credits

    This course would provide students with the skills and knowledge needed to secure organizational resources. Topics covered include: a review of networking protocols, IOS and router filters, physical security, information assurance, computer security policies, contingency planning, business impact analysis, password management, information warfare, intrusion detection, honey pots, attack vectors, firewalls and perimeters, risk assessment and auditing, cryptography and steganography, PGP, wireless, operational security, permissions and user rights, service patches, securing network services, security baseline analyzers, Linux, and virtual machines.

    Prerequisite: CPT 120 or permission of instructor.

    CPT 225 - Network Perimeter Security

    4 Credits

    This course focuses on the design and implementation of network perimeter security. Topics include: threat vectors, encapsulation at OSI layers 2, 3, 4, and 5, packet decoding, static filters, stateful filters, stateful inspection, intrusion detection and prevention, Network Address Translation (NAT), Access Control Lists (ACLs), Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), proxies, border routers, firewall rule bases, web application and database firewalls, securing the OS and services, firewall assessment, vulnerability assessment, baseline audits, forensics, logging, encryption, authentication, VPNs, wireless, network access control, and security tools.

    Prerequisite: CPT 120

    CPT 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

CRC - Computer Related Curricula

    CRC 101 - Practical Computer Literacy

    3 Credits

    This course is designed for persons with no experience using a computer. Focus will be on personal computers (PC) using the Microsoft Windows operating system, but other operating systems will be discussed. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to execute basic commands for creating, saving, deleting and locating files on a PC, prepare and print documents in Microsoft Word, design and set up a spreadsheet with basic functions and graphs using Microsoft Excel, identify major components of a computer system, operate a computer in a network environment, work with e-mail, use an Internet browser, communicate effectively with computer personnel, and understand and use appropriate terminology, especially as it relates to purchasing and operating a PC. This is a hands-on course. Several major projects will be assigned to be completed outside of class time. Students are not required to own a computer. Open to any student. Keyboarding skills are recommended.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    CRC 110 - Introduction to Web Site Design

    1 Credit

    Hands-on practice designing and writing HTML documents. Students will learn to create WEB pages for fun, education, and business. Students will also discover how to add tables, images, sound, video and forms to their WEB pages. Project required. BASIC KNOWLEDGE OF MICROSOFT WINDOWS INCLUDING FILE MANAGEMENT IS REQUIRED.

    CRC 111 - Surfing the Internet

    1 Credit

    A hands-on introductory course on accessing the Internet using a browser program. Students will learn the history of the Internet and it's impact on society. Students will be taught the basic tools of the World Wide Web for searching, uploading, and downloading. E-mail, newsgroups, and chat rooms will also be covered. Projects required. Basic knowledge of the PC, keyboard, mouse, and Windows are required.

    CRC 112 - Introduction to Microsoft Windows

    1 Credit

    An introduction to the Windows operating system. Students will learn the basics of mouse functions, managing your computer's desktop, opening programs, switching between windows, and file management.

    CRC 113 - Introduction to Microsoft Excel

    1 Credit

    This course is designed to cover the main features of Excel and demonstrate the advantages of using a powerful electronic spreadsheet. This hands-on course will give the student an overview of creating and formatting worksheets, manipulating data, and designing charts. Project required. Basic knowledge of the PC, keyboard, and mouse are required.

    CRC 115 - Introduction to Microsoft Word

    1 Credit

    A word processing course designed to introduce Word. Students will learn how to create, modify, and print documents. This hands-on course includes specially prepared exercises that give practical experience in using Word's tools. Project required. Basic knowledge of the PC, keyboard, and mouse are required.

    CRC 116 - Introduction to Microsoft Access

    1 Credit

    An introduction to database theory and practice using the features of Access. Students will learn to create and modify the database, design and create queries, and use forms and reports in a 'hands-on' lab environment. Project required. Basic knowledge of the PC, keyboard, and mouse are required.

    CRC 117 - Introduction to Microsoft PowerPoint

    1 Credit

    This course covers PowerPoint's major features. Students will be able to create and customize multimedia presentations. Specially prepared exercises will provide 'hands-on' learning. Project required. Basic knowledge of the PC, keyboard, and mouse are required.

    CRC 120 - Introduction to Health Information Processing

    3 Credits

    A study of information technology concepts as they relate to health information. Topics include an overview of information processing concepts and computer hardware and software. Learning and lab activities involve use of the Internet and Microsoft Word, Access, Excel, and PowerPoint, as used in health care related settings.

    CRC 122 - Computer Animation Using Alice

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the fundamentals of computer programming using the programming environment called Alice. This is an introductory course in object-oriented programming using animation. Alice enables you to create animation projects in a small virtual world using 3-dimensional models. Using the Alice programming language you can be a director of a movie, or creator of a video game where 3D objects in an on-screen virtual world move around according to the directions you provide. Basic knowledge of the personal computer, including file maintenance, is required. It is assumed that all students have experience using personal computers, an electronic mail system, and the Internet.

    Prerequisite: MTH 098 must be completed or up to Math Level 6

    CRC 125 - Microsoft Office

    4 Credits

    Provides an indepth, hands-on introduction to major application software programs found in the Microsoft Software Package: Microsoft Office. The following software packages will be utilized: Microsoft Word (word processing), Microsoft Excel (spreadsheet), Microsoft Access (database management), and Microsoft Powerpoint (presentation). Several major projects are assigned. Basic knowledge of the PC keyboard and mouse are recommended prior to enrollment in this course. Course is not open to students who have taken CRC 113, CRC 115, CRC 116, and CRC 117. Students can earn credit for only one of the following courses: CIS 121, ITG 102, CRC 125.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    CRC 132 - A Global Perspective on Mobile and Cloud Computing

    3 Credits

    This course examines the technological infrastructures deployed in various regions of the world that facilitate cloud and mobile computing. In this course, students will investigate the technical issues surrounding access and ownership of mobile services and resources in the cloud.

    CRC 133 - Cloud Computing Design and Implementation

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to cloud computing frameworks and the techniques used to design, develop, and implement these systems. The course will emphasize hands-on, project-based learning and will include practical laboratory exercises that involve setting up Windows-based clouds using client portals, servers, virtual machines, and the accompanying network infrastructure.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor

    CRC 170 - Spreadsheet Applications Excel

    3 Credits

    An intensive course covering Microsoft Excel. Objectives include preparing, formatting, and enhancing worksheets, applying formulas and functions, charting, using analysis, linking, workgroup features, and increase productivity through use of macros and templates. This course is designed to teach skill sets needed for the Microsoft Office Certification Exam. Knowledge of the personal computer, keyboard and mouse is strongly recommended. A student may earn credit for CRC 170 or OFT 170, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses.

    CRC 171 - Microsoft Access-Records Management

    3 Credits

    An intensive course that covers Microsoft Access. Objectives include planning and designing databases; building and modifying tables, forms, and reports; advanced manipulation of data; defining relationships; modification of report properties; subforms, switchboards, PivotTables, and importing/exporting data. This course is designed to cover skill sets needed for the Microsoft Office Certification Exam. Knowledge of the personal computer, keyboard, and mouse is strongly recommended.

    CRC 230 - Cloud Security

    3 Credits

    The economies of scale and flexibility of cloud systems offer strengths and challenges from a security perspective. The enormous concentrations of resources and data found in the cloud present a very attractive target for malicious activity. However, cloud-based resistance to threats can be made robust, scalable, and cost-effective. This course focuses on the development of strategies that address the security risks and benefits of using cloud computing and on developing Defense-in-Depth tactics to protect corporate resources deployed in the cloud.

    Prerequisite: CRC 133

    CRC 231 - Mobile Computing

    3 Credits

    This course will cover the nomenclature and implementation of mobile computing and mobile communication. Coverage mobile systems will include 2G, 2.5G, 3G, 3G+, and 4G communication systems, mobile satellite communication networks, mobile IP, mobile TCP, digital audio-video broadcasting, and mobile TV. This course will also provide a systematic explanation of mobile computing as a discrete discipline and will provide an in-depth coverage of mobile systems and devices, mobile operating systems used for application development, mobile databases, client-server computing agents, application servers, security protocols, mobile Internet, and ad-hoc and sensor networks.

    Prerequisite: CRC 133

    CRC 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

CRJ - Criminal Justice

    CRJ 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

    3 Credits

    Examines all three segments of criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts, and corrections, including study of their evolution, structure, agencies, career opportunities and requirements, responsibilities, and ethics. Role of Constitution and state and federal laws, current problems of each.

    Prerequisite(s): College English placement and Accuplacer reading score above 70 or College English placement and Accuplacer reading score below 70 and REA 100 or TRS 200 or TRS 105 and REA 100 if Accuplacer reading score is not above 70. Co-requisite(s): TRS 200 or TRS 105 and REA 100 if Accuplacer reading score is not above 70.

    CRJ 102 - Introduction to Private Security/Loss Prevention

    3 Credits

    This course will cover the development, role, responsibility, limitations and liabilities of the private security industry within society from its beginnings to its current state. Specific attention will be spent on describing the relationship between private security professionals, law enforcement and representatives of the legal system. Additional topics such as work place violence, organized retail theft, the conduct of internal and external investigations, interviewing techniques, current role and impact technology, and career opportunities will also be analyzed and evaluated.

    CRJ 103 - Constitutional Law and Rights of People

    3 Credits

    A study of the Federal Constitution and the Bill of Rights with regard to the rights of the individual, as interpreted by leading U.S. Supreme Court decisions. The first, fourth, fifth, sixth, eighth, and fourteenth amendments will be primarily focused upon with an emphasis on their law enforcement impact.

    Prerequisite(s): College English placement and Accuplacer reading score above 70 or College English placement and Accuplacer reading score below 70 and REA 100 or TRS 200 or TRS 105 and REA 100 if Accuplacer reading score is not above 70. Co-requisite(s): TRS 200 or TRS 105 and REA 100 if Accuplacer reading score is not above 70.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD), MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT)

    CRJ 104 - Criminal Law

    3 Credits

    A study of the fundamental concepts of the substantive criminal law, including a short history of and purposes of the law, classification of offenses and sentences. A detailed study of mental culpability, defenses, such as infancy, insanity and the anticipatory crimes, offenses against the person; and those involving intrusion upon property, fraud, public administration, and public order. (Need not be taken in sequence.)

    Prerequisites: CRJ 101, CRJ 103 or permission of instructor

    CRJ 121 - Criminal Justice Education Internship I

    3 Credits

    An activity designed to enhance both the theoretical and educational concepts learned in the practical work experience gained by working 80 hours during a semester in an approved criminal justice agency. This course is also designed to assist you in your career exploration. You are required to find the right agency in which to do your internship. To get the most out of this course you should be working in an agency and in a position that best represents your career goal. Papers and assignments will be completed on the work experiences and their educational value.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of CRJ 101,CRJ 103, CRJ 104 or CRJ 171, and CRJ 204, or permission of instructor.

    CRJ 170 - Introduction to Corrections

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the major programs within the corrections component of the criminal justice system. It includes analysis of probation, institutional treatment, parole, and community corrections programs. Development of corrections philosophy, theory, and practice will be presented with emphasis on constitutional rights of offenders.

    CRJ 171 - Legal Aspects of Corrections

    3 Credits

    A review of the Constitution, Bill of Rights, civil rights of institutional inmates and those under supervision; legal authority and responsibilities of institutional, probation and parole officers; procedural law with an explanation of the court systems of the U.S. at all levels, emphasizing adversary proceedings in the criminal and civil courts as they apply to corrections.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103.

    CRJ 172 - Institutional Procedures and Treatment of Inmates

    3 Credits

    The function of the correctional officer is examined: attitude, obligations and authority. Institutional procedures in reception, classification, program assignment and release procedures are reviewed. Trends in jail programs, work release programs, half-way houses, narcotic addiction control centers and contract program planning are described and evaluated.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103.

    CRJ 201 - Criminal Investigations

    3 Credits

    A study of the qualities of an investigation, general criminal investigative methods, procedures and techniques, and phases of investigation.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103.

    CRJ 203 - Private Security/ Loss Prevention Investigations

    3 Credits

    This course will cover the process of initiating, conducting and completing an investigation within the private security field. Particular attention will focus on the role of technology within private security investigations, analyzing different types of investigations, defining the multiple components of an investigation, describing skills an investigator must possess, explaining the interviewing process of witnesses and suspects, and the obtaining of written statements. Finally, additional topics such as legal liabilities, investigator and business responsibilities, the role of law enforcement, and the future of private investigative services will be discussed.

    Prerequisite: CRJ 102

    CRJ 204 - Juvenile Justice

    3 Credits

    Juvenile delinquency and the role of the criminal justice practitioner in handling juvenile matters is examined. The philosophy and history of juvenile proceedings, including trends in prevention, placements, current court decisions and "rights of children" are emphasized. The Family Court Law of New York and handling of juvenile matters are explored.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103.

    CRJ 207 - Criminal Evidence

    3 Credits

    A study of rules of evidence in criminal matters. Particular emphasis is placed on rules of evidence in the fourth, fifth, and sixth amendments of the Bill of Rights which safeguard such fundamental individual liberties as personal security, protection from self-incrimination, and right to counsel, with emphasis on New York law.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103.

    CRJ 209 - Crime Scene Management

    3 Credits

    Examines the application of the physical and biological sciences to criminal investigation. Modern technology will be detailed as it applies to crime scene management, fingerprint science and photography. Emphasis is placed on the inter-relationship between science and law enforcement. The student will have the opportunity, in a classroom equipped with laboratory materials, to demonstrate their learning with hands-on activities directly related to the contemporary crime scene.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103, or permission of instructor.

    CRJ 211 - Community Values and the Administration of Justice

    3 Credits

    The inter-relationship of community values and ethical conduct in the administration of justice is explored. Through interaction and study, the student will become aware of how community and professional expectations can affect role performance. Open communication and accountability within and without the justice process will be stressed. (It is strongly suggested that students register for this course during their final semester before graduation.)

    Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101, CRJ 103, CRJ 104 or CRJ 171, CRJ 121, CRJ 204, or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: CRJ 121

    CRJ 217 - Community Based Corrections

    3 Credits

    A seminar which explores alternatives to incarceration in centralized penal institutions. Problems of work-release and school-release programs are discussed. Management of halfway houses, probation, and parole are reviewed. The success and failure of community-based corrections programs in the United States and in Europe are also explored.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of CRJ 101 and CRJ 103.

    CRJ 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

CSC - Computer Science

    CSC 101 - Introduction to Computer Science

    4 Credits

    A first course in programming for the Computer Science student. Emphasis will be on program specification, analysis, problem solving and implementation using an object-oriented language such as JAVA. Topics include definitions of classes and objects, algorithm development and methods, primitive and reference data types, arrays, strings, and operators. Successful completion of this course with a C or better is required for further progress in Computer degree programs. Several major programming projects will be assigned to be completed outside of class and lab. Completion of this course with a C or better is required before taking any other CSC courses.

    Prerequisite: MTH 172 or MTH 175, or CIS 100 and MTH 165, or MTH 165 and CPT 114, all with a grade of C or better

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    CSC 103 - Introduction to Data Structures

    4 Credits

    An introduction to basic data structures, and a continuation of CSC 101 for Computer Science majors. Topics include sequential lists, linked lists, stacks, queues, recursion, binary trees, searching and sorting. Other topics include algorithm analysis and design, inheritance, polymorphism. An object oriented language such as Java will be used to implement algorithm and further develop general programming skills. Students will be required to complete several programming projects outside of class.

    Prerequisite: CSC 101 with a grade of C or better.

    CSC 202 - Programming Embedded Microcontrollers in C and Assembly

    4 Credits

    The student will learn how to program, interface and troubleshoot a modern embedded processor such as the Motorola 68HC12 in both C and Assembly Language. Microcontroller architecture will be stressed. Topics include Synchronous and Asynchronous Input/Output, Analog to Digital Conversion, Pulse Width Modulation, Timer/Counters, Interrupts and Parallel Port Programming. Laboratory work will focus on program development, implementation and debugging techniques. Several programming projects will be assigned to be completed outside of class and in lab. A final project and student presentation are required.

    Prerequisite:MTH 165 with a C or better and CIS 200 or CPT 101 or CSC 101 or ENR 161 or ENR 157 with a C or better.

    CSC 206 - Digital Computer Organization

    3 Credits

    This course provides an introduction to the design of the digital computer. Topics include number systems, digital gates, Boolean Algebra, design and implementation of combinational and sequential circuits, decoders, encoders, multiplexors, flip-flops, counters, registers and memory devices. Laboratory experiments include building combinational and sequential circuits.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 200 or CPT 101 or CSC 101 with a grade of C or better.

    CSC 214 - Electronic Vision and Image Processing

    3 Credits

    This course introduces the student to the basic elements of digital image acquisition and processing by examining how CCD's (charge coupled devices) function and how they are used in a camera to capture an image. Practical hands-on laboratory projects reinforce concepts while the student learns how a truly scientific grade, low noise CCD camera is built from ground-up using discrete components. The students problem solving skills are put to the test as they work in small specialized groups to attack challenging problems. Practical programming skills are developed as the student learns how to apply a high level programming language such as Java, C, Python and/or LabVIEW to facilitate in design, experimentation, data acquisition, image processing and analysis. Topics covered include: types of image sensors, performance characteristics, noise, digitization, scaling, color and gray scale rendition. This course is typically offered in the Spring, biannually.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 165 or higher and one of: CIS 200 or CSC 101 or CPT 101 or CSC 223, both with a grade of C or better.

    CSC 215 - Introduction to Linux

    3 Credits

    A course designed to introduce the student to the Linux operating system. Topics will include system installation and configuration, basic system administration, system updates, network services configuration, printer configuration, system services, and scripting.

    Prerequisite(s): CIS 200 or CSC 101 or CPT 101 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor.

    CSC 223 - Computer Programming - "C++"

    3 Credits

    This course presents the principles of computer programming using the C++ language. Topics covered include the use of variable types, expressions, control structures, pre-processor commands, functions, arrays, strings, pointers, structures, classes, objects, and files. Several major programming projects will be assigned to be completed outside of class and laboratory time.
    Students can earn credit for only one of the following courses: CIS 223, ITP 202, CSC 223.

    Prerequisites(s): CPT 101 or CSC 101 or CIS 200 with a grade of C or better.

    CSC 225 - Advanced JAVA Programming

    3 Credits

    A second course in Java programming focusing on advanced language features. Topics will include Object Oriented Analysis and Design (OOAD), methodologies, automatic documentation generation using JAVADOC, Graphical User Interface (GUI) development, threads, database programming using Java Database Connectivity (JDBC), network programming using sockets and Remote Method Invocation (RMI), N-tier programming using Common Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), object serialization and remote objects, and collections. Students can earn credit for only one of the following: CIS 225, ITP 201, CSC 225.

    Prerequisite: CSC 101 or CSC 223 with a grade of C or better

    CSC 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

DAS - Dental Assisting

    DAS 110 - Preclinical Dental Assisting

    4 Credits

    This course provides foundational didactic content and preclinical/laboratory practice of essential dental assisting skills and chairside dental assisting functions. Topics include examination and assessment procedures, equipment and materials, instrumentation techniques, treatment procedures and the legal supportive functions/skills performed by a licensed dental assistant during restorative procedures. Preclinical practice will prepare students for clinical externship experiences in the spring semester.

    **DAS 110 SLN is offered as part of the D.A.R.T. online DA program.

    DAS 115 - Orientation to Dental Assisting Clinical Practice

    1 Credit

    This course will provide orientation activities and didactic coursework to prepare the students for the mandatory clinical externship experience. Coursework will include orientations to clinical externship facilities, review of policies and protocols, clinical observation requirements, HIPAA regulations and compliance and professional clinical practice issues.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of DAS 110, DEN 111, DEN 112, DEN 113, and DEN 211.

    DAS 117 - Biomedical Foundations for Dental Assisting Practice

    3 Credits

    This course will offer a didactic component that will include higher level science-based theory and case study investigation to expand the student's educational foundation, clinical application, critical thinking skills and ability to research and interpret new technologies and procedures to enhance patient treatment and promote oral health care.

    DAS 120 - Clinical Dental Assisting Practice

    4 Credits

    This course is the clinical phase of the program and will emphasize practical application of clinical dental assisting skills as students rotate through various dental practice facilities. Students will have opportunities to observe procedures, actively practice dental assisting functions and work with dental professionals in general dentistry and specialty practice settings. A conference component provides an opportunity to discuss clinical experiences, introduce advanced and alternative treatment modalities, discuss patient education and patient management issues, learn about medically compromised patients and emergency procedures and discuss ethical, legal and professionalism issues related to dental practice and patient treatment.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of DAS 110, DEN 111, DEN 112, DEN 113, DEN 211.

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    DAS 121 - Dental Assisting Clinical Experience

    1 Credit

    This course accompanies DAS 117 and includes the clinical experience requirements necessary for completion of the Dental Assistant Rapid Track (DART) program. Students must successfully pass all skill competencies and meet or exceed the specific clinical experiences and hour requirements. This course will provide an opportunity to apply dental assisting skills in a clinical setting. Students will actively participate in and practice dental treatment procedures in both general dentistry and specialty areas. Specific skill competency will include those functions/procedures allowed by the New York State Education Law.

    DAS 122 - Advanced Biomedical Sciences for Dental Assisting Practice

    2 Credits

    This course will focus on didactic content in biomedical sciences to provide the foundational knowledge to assess and adapt to individual patient needs, provide relevant and current patient education, deliver safe and effective patient treatment and understand oral diseases and treatment options. Topics will include: embryology and histology, preventive dentistry, oral pathology, microbiology, nutrition and pharmacology.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of DAS 110, DEN 111, DEN 112, DEN 113, DEN 211

    DAS 227 - Dental Specialties Procedures

    2 Credits

    This course will focus on treatment procedures specific to a variety of dental specialty practices. Topics will include treatment procedures, instrumentation and armamentarium for treatment, patient education, pre and post- operative instruction, patient management techniques and the role and responsibility of the dental assistant in each specialty practice. Laboratory practice will focus on practice of competency skills including expanded functions that support and deliver patient treatment.

    Successful completion of all first semester DAS and DEN courses.

    DAS 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

DEN - Dental Hygiene

    DEN 110 - Dental Health Education

    1 Credit

    Emphasis is placed on the philosophies of education, communication skills and motivational techniques as they apply to individuals and group health education. Also included are planning, organizing and evaluating chair-side dental health education, methods of presentation, and use resource material.

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C is required in this course to continue in the program for DEN students and a C- for DAS students.

    DEN 111 - Dental Radiography I

    2 Credits

    An introduction to physics and biology of radiation; radiation hygiene; equipment and materials; film exposure and processing, technique and chemistry.

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C is required in this course to continue in the program for DEN students and a C- for DAS students.

    DEN 112 - Oral Anatomy and Physiology I

    2 Credits

    This course includes anatomical identification of and discussion of function of the structures of the oral cavity and the surrounding landmarks of the face and head. Clinical application will be discussed concerning occlusion, anesthesia, mastication, radiographic interpretation, and identification of variations in anatomy.

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C is required in this course to continue in the program for DEN students and a C- for DAS students.

    DEN 113 - Barrier Precautions and Infection Control Measures

    1 Credit

    Focuses on the scientifically accepted principles and practices of infection control. This course will provide the student with the core elements on infection control and barrier precautions.

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C is required in this course to continue in the program for DEN students and a C- for DAS students.

    DEN 114 - Dental Hygiene I

    2 Credits

    An introduction to dental and dental hygiene practice; basic concepts, methods materials and techniques of dental hygiene care.

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C is required in this course to continue in the program for DEN students and a C- for DAS students.

    DEN 115 - Clinical Dental Hygiene I

    2 Credits

    Emphasis in this course is placed on the practical application of dental hygiene care. Students will be required to be a partner for technique practice.

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C is required in this course to continue in the program for DEN students and a C- for DAS students.

    DEN 121 - Dental Radiography II

    2 Credits

    Continuation of DEN 111. Anatomical landmarks; deviations from normal; evaluation of radiographs. Extra and intraoral projections.

    Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C is required in this course to continue in the program for DEN students and a C- for DAS students.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    DEN 122 - Oral Anatomy and Physiology II

    2 Credits

    This course will study the embryologic development of the face, oral cavity and the teeth and histologic structure of the teeth and oral tissues, and review developmental conditions and anomalies related to dental and oral structures. Function and variations in function will be review as well as the clinical significance and application of knowledge to patient evaluation and treatment.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 123 - Oral Pathology I

    1 Credit

    A brief introduction to principles of general pathology and inflammation. Students will learn to identify and describe normal and abnormal oral soft tissue lesions. Emphasis will be on pathology of oral mucosa, dental tissues and related structures. Developmental anomalies of teeth and anatomical variation of oral soft tissues will be studied; also systemic diseases and their oral manifestations.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 124 - Dental Hygiene II

    1 Credit

    This course continues to build knowledge for dental hygiene care, treatment planning, and case management.

    DEN 125 - Clinical Dental Hygiene II

    4 Credits

    The beginning level of clinical patient care utilizing primary level skills in patient histories, exams, patient education, treatment, planning, and record keeping. Students are required to recruit patients in order to meet clinical requirements.

    Prerequisite: BIO 134 or BIO 142, and successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 129 - Periodontics I

    1 Credit

    This course begins with a brief review of normal periodontal anatomy and physiology. Classification of periodontal diseases will be discussed with emphasis on plaque induced periodontal diseases. Examination, clinical characteristics, risk factors, and management of patients with these types of periodontal diseases is included.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 211 - Dental Materials

    2 Credits

    This course includes a study of the physical and chemical properties, manipulation of and uses for the most commonly used dental materials. A lecture component will present background information about the dental materials and a laboratory component will present the practical application for each material (demonstration and lab practice).

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 212 - Community Dentistry I

    1 Credit

    This course will provide the student with knowledge regarding the foundation of community dentistry and its role in society. Students will explore the primary fields involved in assessing and improving the public's dental health, including epidemiology and biostatistics. In addition, students will gain experience in evaluating scholarly dental literature.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 213 - Oral Pathology II

    1 Credit

    This course is a continuation of study of pathology or oral mucosa, dental tissues and related structures. Students will view images of oral/facial lesions and answer related questions.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 214 - Dental Hygiene III

    2 Credits

    The focus of this course is on advanced techniques for comprehensive dental hygiene care. Emphasis is placed on case study to help student prepare for the Dental Hygiene National Board.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 215 - Clinical Dental Hygiene III

    4 Credits

    Course emphasis will be on comprehensive patient care and treatment planning. Course includes radiographic evaluation. A continuation of clinical skill development begun in DEN 125. Students are required to recruit patients in order to meet clinical requirements.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 216 - Dental Therapeutics I

    1 Credit

    Systematic approach to general principles of pharmacology. Study of commonly used agents in dentistry, drugs used in specific medical conditions, and drugs used in management of medical emergencies. Introduction to newer drugs and new effects of old drugs. Brief discussion on controlled drugs and drug abuse.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 217 - Dental Specialties

    1 Credit

    This course examines the essential components, clinical procedures performed, and armamentarium (instruments/equipment) used in the various dental specialties. Students will learn the interactive roles of each dental team member in the practice of the dental specialties. Introduction to the clinical advances and new trends in dentistry is included.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 219 - Periodontics II

    1 Credit

    This course is a continuation of study of periodontal diseases. It covers pathogenesis of diseases, critical analysis of patient assessments, current treatment modalities, and rationale for the same.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 222 - Community Dentistry II

    1 Credit

    This course will provide the student with knowledge regarding the assessment of community dental health needs, particularly through the use of dental indices and biostatistical measures. Students will explore the methods of oral health promotion, disease prevention, and program planning.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 224 - Dental Hygiene IV

    1 Credit

    Review of the history of dental hygiene. Course focus will be on ethics, jurisprudence, current issues and trends in dental hygiene.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    DEN 225 - Clinical Dental Hygiene IV

    4 Credits

    Improvement of clinical skills developed in DEN 215. Students will continue to develop advanced clinical skills, comprehensive dental hygiene treatment plan, total patient care and supportive periodontal treatment (SPT). Course includes radiographic evaluation. Students are required to recruit patients in order to meet clinical requirements.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 226 - Dental Therapeutics II

    1-3 Credits

    Continuation of study of drugs significant to dental practice. Emphasis will be on evaluation and dental management of medically compromised patients with special attention to their medications and drug interactions.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 228 - Dental Office Management and Business Practice

    1 Credit

    This course will help prepare the dental studies student for the job market, and will emphasize dental office practice management and job seeking skills.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 229 - Periodontics III

    1 Credit

    Various periodontal surgical procedures will be reviewed in this course. Students will learn pre and post care of periodontal patients, post surgical complications, and latest advances in periodontal diagnostics/treatment. Diagnosis and management concepts of various periodontal diseases will be discussed through case-studies format. Students will write a "Perio Paper" (Writing Intensive Course).

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous semesters DEN courses with a grade of C or better.

    DEN 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

EBL - Experience Based Learning

    EBL 101 - Experience Based Learning

    3 Credits

    Experienced Based Learning is a credit bearing work-based program that allows students to work at a job related to their career interest while continuing classroom education. An interested student is responsible for locating an employer willing to provide him/her a paid or unpaid position. This experience based learning option may not be repeated for credit.

    Permission of Director Academic Services or Director of Career Services is required.

ECE - Education and Early Care

    ECE 110 - Seminar for Early Childhood Care Givers

    1 Credit

    This course focuses on professional development for the early childhood care giver. It provides a comprehensive study of the current opportunities for professional development, examination of state and national standards and requirements, identification of roles and settings within the early care and education field, and will lead to the design of an individualized plan for each care giver to follow for career advancement.

    ECE 130 - Field Work Child Care Practitioner I

    3 Credits

    Students in this course will have the opportunity to receive hands on group experience in licensed child care centers or Head Start facilities. Weekly meetings with experienced education instructors will coincide with curriculum for ECE 150 and ECE 151.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE 150 and ECE 151.

    ECE 150 - Exploring Early Care and Education

    3 Credits

    This course will lay the foundation for understanding the field of early childhood education. Child development pre-birth through age 8 will be discussed. Participants will gain an understanding of how to arrange a safe, healthy learning environment, while focusing on a child's social emotional well being. Supportive guidance techniques will be addressed, as well as observation and assessment skills, in addition to the value and importance of play in children's lives.

    ECE 151 - Developmentally Appropriate Practice for Young Children

    3 Credits

    This course examines the foundations of early childhood education, as well as the development of children’s physical, cognitive, communication and creative skills. Particular emphasis is placed on children with special needs, and the early childhood teacher’s role. Anti-Bias curriculum will be explored as a function of student, teacher and family interaction.

    ECE 152 - Early Childhood Quality Practices for Professionals

    3 Credits

    This course addresses three key components of practice in the field of early care and education: program management, working with families and professionalism. Students will engage in critical thinking on issues plaguing the field as they participate in practical exercises for direct application to their work with children and families.

    ECE 200 - Developing Early Literacy

    3 Credits

    This course examines emotional, socio-cultural and cognitive influences on early literacy development, and explores twelve essential concepts related to early reading success through a collaborative learning approach.

    ECE 230 - Field Work Child Care Practitioner II

    3 Credits

    Students in this course will have the opportunity to receive hands on group experience in licensed child care centers or Head Start facilities. Weekly meetings with experienced education instructors will coincide with curriculum for ECE 152.

    Prerequisite: ECE 152.

    ECE 250 - Infant and Toddler Development

    3 Credits

    This course is designed for individuals who are currently working in early care and education programs, students who are interested in a career involving children and families, and students who are or will be parents.

    The instructor’s role in this class is to provide a theoretical framework, activities and assignments for students to utilize in developing understanding, knowledge and skills in working with infants and toddlers.

    ECE 251 - Family and Culture

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to create awareness and understanding of the delicate balance and importance of family and cultural impact on the lives of infants and toddlers. Students will learn how to identify and articulate differing parenting styles as well as develop effective communication skills.

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ECE 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

ECO - Economics

    ECO 101 - Introduction to Economics

    3 Credits

    A one-semester, non-technical course designed to answer questions about the economy. How and why does our market economic system work? Why is there inflation and/or unemployment and what are their remedies? How does the government influence your future economic well-being? Where are we on the business cycle? What are the causes and consequences of our growing national debt? What is the Federal Reserve and how does its monetary policy affect you and the interest rate? How is the emerging global interdependence of countries changing our economy and your life? This course will help you understand the economic environment in which you live, work, and vote. This course is not recommended as a Social Science Elective for students enrolled in A.S. programs in Business Administration or International Business.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ECO 103 - Personal Money Management

    3 Credits

    A very practical course which teaches you how to create a financial plan to realize goals, such as home ownership and early retirement. By taking this course, you will learn how to avoid credit trouble, save money on automobile purchases, and buy a desirable home. You will also learn how to protect yourself from financial disaster through the purchase of the lowest cost and safest insurance policies. Finally, you will learn how to make your money grow by investing in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. Using the techniques you learn in this class will allow you to plan, save, and spend wisely so you and your family will enjoy a better way of life.

    ECO 110 - Personal Investing

    3 Credits

    This course is about making money. You will learn the "ins" and "outs" of investing in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. You will simulate investing using current market data to choose the best stock and bond mutual funds. Learn to use tax advantaged methods of investing, such as 401K plans and IRA's to help your money grow. Additional investment choices will be examined, such as real estate, options, and collectibles. Upon completion of the course, you will have an understanding of Wall Street, the Dow Jones, and various financial markets.

    ECO 111 - Principles of Microeconomics

    3 Credits

    This course will help you gain insight and understanding into events that are constantly going on around you. You will learn how to think like an economist by analyzing everything critically, comparing costs and benefits, even in issues normally considered outside the scope of economics. You will use economic reasoning to decide whether you will read your book of economics, whether you will attend class, whom you will marry, and what kind of work you will likely go into after you graduate. The skill you will need to start thinking like an economist will be acquired from topics covered, such as opportunity cost, scarcity and choices, demand, supply, production and costs, the market system, elasticity, market structures, etc.

    Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra or MTH 104.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ECO 112 - Principles of Macroeconomics

    3 Credits

    Course focuses on the on-going concerns of the United States economy, unemployment, inflation, and gross domestic product. International economics is woven throughout the course helping to explain the impact of the globalization of our economy and your economic future. To illustrate and aid the student's understanding of these concepts and topics, the course makes extensive use of current events. Students will gain a full view of the current United States economic environment and macroeconomic theory. This course explores macroeconomic models and approaches, such as national income accounting, circular flow, aggregate demand and aggregate supply, and fiscal and monetary policy.

    Prerequisite: ECO 111 with a grade of C or higher.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ECO 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

EDU - Education

    EDU 100 - Introduction to the Teaching Profession

    1 Credit

    A seminar introducing students to the field of teaching. Topics include current learning standards, lesson plan components, the realities of teaching as a career, certification requirements, professional expectations, and an introduction to teaching strategies. This course provides students with the opportunity to explore the field of teaching, reflect on their interest in education, create and present an instructional lesson, and develop connections with other future educators.

    EDU 125 - Technology in Education

    2 Credits

    An introductory course designed to expose students to current technologies used in modern education. Students will have hands-on practice working with various technology tools and will examine practical applications for enhancing the teaching and learning process, as well as the ethical issues and barriers surrounding implementation.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    EDU 150 - Performance and Presentation Skills for Educators

    3 Credits

    Teachers must communicate effectively in order to achieve their goal of student learning and success. This course uses the performing arts as a point of reference and enables participants to develop materials and present them effectively in a variety of teaching situations. Learning styles, oral presentation, body language, the use of props, proxemics and room arrangement, and audio visuals will be the skills developed through this course. These skills will be compared to those used in a variety of performing arts venues so that appropriate stage techniques can be integrated into student teaching/presentations assignments.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    EDU 200 - Foundations of Education

    3 Credits

    This course will explore the American education system through a social justice perspective. It will focus on the foundations of the American education system with emphasis on how ancient Chinese, Roman, Grecian and Anglo-Saxon cultures and philosophies helped frame the historic, philosophical, economic and socio-cultural roots of the American education system. Additionally, the impact of contemporary western and other world civilizations and their correlates to political, economic, legal and ethical bases of American education policies will be studied. Students will conduct, synthesize and present research on relevant American education policies and protocols. Within this framework, contemporary American educational values and issues will be critically examined.

    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: EDU 100;

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-WC - Western Civilization (SWCV)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    EDU 208 - Guided Observation in Education

    3 Credits

    Guided Observation in Education is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to (1) explore the profession of teaching at an early point in the student's academic career, (2) observe in a classroom from the perspective of a teacher, (3) meet with the classroom teacher to discuss issues covered in the seminar and issues that arise in the classroom, (4) participate in classroom activities addressing unmet educational needs such as: lesson planning, working with small groups, one-on-one support, and (5) reflect on course objectives as experienced through fieldwork placement. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a social science elective. One and one-half class hours, four fieldwork hours. Upon successful completion of this course, students will earn 20 hours of service-learning credit.

    Prerequisite: EDU 200 with a grade of C or higher and PSY 201 or PSY 202 with a grade of C or higher

ELT - Electrical Engineering Technology/Electronics

    ELT 102 - Electric Circuit Analysis II

    5 Credits

    Continuation of ELT 101 into AC circuit analysis using complex numbers and phasors. Topics include: magnetism, inductance, reactance, impedance, power, resonance, filters, Fourier series, transformers and dependent sources. Includes network analysis using Thevenin, Norton, mesh, and nodal techniques. Computer analysis of AC circuits is introduced. Concurrent lab applies theory and develops competence in measuring voltage, current, time, frequency, phase, and frequency response, using the dual-trace oscilloscope, multimeters, and swept frequency function generator. Construction project is a power supply which is used to introduce rectifiers, filters, regulation and ripple. A specific programmable scientific calculator is required. Contact Department for details.

    Prerequisites: ELT 101 or ELT 121 required; MTH 140 or MTH 135 or MTH 164 or some trigonometry background recommended.

    ELT 111 - Introduction to Digital Electronics

    3 Credits

    Covers a wide range of introductory skills and techniques required by an electronic technician. Topics include AND, OR, NAND, NOR, NOT logic functions and integrated circuits, Boolean Algebra, number systems, flip-flops and simple applications.

    Prerequisite: Level 6 Math placement or MTH 098 with a grade of C or higher or equivalent

    ELT 112 - Linear Circuits

    5 Credits

    Covers a wide range of introductory skills and techniques required by an electronic technician. Topics include semiconductor physics, general purpose and zener diodes, linear power supplies, transistors, transistor amplifiers, and basic operational amplifiers.

    Prerequisite(s): ELT 111 with a grade of C- or better (required) and ELT 102 (taken concurrently or previously completed); TEK 101 (recommended).

    ELT 121 - AC/DC Circuit Analysis

    4 Credits

    A one-semester algebra-based electric circuit analysis course for majors mainly in Electrical Engineering Technology, Mechanical Technology and Optical Technology, as well as others requiring an introduction to both DC and AC signal driven circuit analysis of series, parallel and series parallel resistive circuits and series RC circuits. Topics include: voltage, current, resistance, conductance, Ohm's law, Kirchoff's Voltage and Current laws, voltage and current dividers equations, power, capacitance, a brief introduction to inductance, RC time constant circuits, capacitive reactance and impedance, superposition, Thevenin, Norton, Theorems, computer analysis, and an introduction to troubleshooting. Lab teaches use of digital multimeters, analog VOM, power supplies, dual-trace oscilloscope, function generators, and an introduction to computer generated circuit analysis using Multisim, the concept of circuit loading and meter frequency limitations.

    Prerequisite: High school algebra with some trigonometry or MTH 135. NOTE: Students with no trigonometry should consider taking MTH 164 concurrently.

    ELT 130 - System Electricity

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to basic principles of electricity with an emphasis on their use in technical applications. While learning basic theorems of electricity and completing problem solving exercises, students build and test simple electrical circuits and become familiar with the use of basic test equipment. They also build and test a simple robotic car that uses electrical and electronic circuits in its operating functions.

    Prerequisite/corequisite: MTH 104 or MTH 135 or permission of department.

    ELT 134 - Introduction to Programmable Logic Controller

    3 Credits


    This course will provide the fundamentals of a programmable logic controller (PLC). Hands-on instruction and industrial type applications of PLCs requiring relay ladder logic control and a study of automated manufacturing and the functions of PLCs in an industrial environment will be provided. Topics include components of a PLC, memory organization, discrete input/output, numbering systems, logic gates, Boolean Algebra, relay ladder logic, timers, counters, word level logic, and troubleshooting.

    ELT 201 - Linear Systems

    4 Credits

    A study of linear amplifier and filter circuits. Course topics include small-signal and power amplifiers using bipolar, field-effect transistors and integrated circuits. Frequency response of amplifiers and filters using Bode plots are studied along with the use of negative feedback in systems. Students build, test and troubleshoot amplifier circuits using popular test equipment in the laboratory. The computer (Multisym) is used to analyze single and multistage amplifiers and filters.

    Prerequisites: ELT 102 and ELT 112 with a grade of C- or better.

    ELT 202 - Pulse and Digital Circuits

    4 Credits

    This course covers pulse waveforms, linear circuit responses and switching circuit analysis, pulse-shaping and pulse-generating circuits, flip-flops, one-shots, registers and counters. Different IC logic family characteristics (TTL, NMOS, ECL, CMOS, LVT) will be analyzed and compared. An integral study and analysis of the circuits used when interfacing the different types of IC logic families will be covered. There will be an in-depth analysis and practical applications of the various digital number systems and codes. Arithmetic manipulation of signed and unsigned binary numbers will be also covered. An introduction to the 8-bit microcomputer architecture will be presented. The student will perform computer analysis of digital circuits using the “Electronics Workbench Multisim” software. By means of a Capstone design project, this course offers an integrated learning experience that was designed to give the students a hands-on, real world engineering problem solving experience. Students will design, build, troubleshoot, demonstrate and present a digital capstone design project. Several laboratory experiments throughout the semester will require formal written reports.

    Prerequisites: ELT 102 and ELT 112 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of department.

    ELT 204 - Industrial Electronics and Control

    4 Credits

    A survey of electronic circuits and systems in industrial and control settings. Topics include a description of various popular sensors, industrial electronic devices such as SCRs, Triacs, and UJTs, ladder diagrams using relays and their solid-state equivalents, actuating devices including a large number of motors and controllers, and finally the use of programmable logic controllers. The student builds and tests a number of industrial electronic circuits and controllers in the laboratory. The computer (LavVIEW) is used to analyze, emulate, and test various control systems.

    Prerequisites: ELT 201 and 202 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of department.

    ELT 205 - Communication Systems

    5 Credits

    An introduction to radio communication theory. Topics include oscillation, tuned and rf amplifiers, transmission line effects, matching techniques using the Smith chart, spectral analysis using the Fourier series, AM/FM/SSB transmitter and receiver designs, video and stereo designs, and data communication. In the laboratory, students build and test communication circuits using an assortment of popular devices and test equipment used in this field. The computer (Multisym) is used to emulate, analyze, and collect data for communication circuits and systems.

    Prerequisite: ELT 201 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of department chairperson. NOTE: In addition to prerequisite, ELT 202 is recommended.

    ELT 206 - Digital Systems and Microprocessors

    5 Credits

    A study of digital systems and the building blocks that make up digital systems. The emphasis will be on microprocessor-based systems hardware, programming and interfacing. The major topics include arithmetic circuits, multiplexers, demultiplexers, decoders, encoders, tri-state bus devices, DACs and ADCs, memory devices (SRAM, DRAM, Flash, PLD's, ROM), microprocessor architecture, microcomputer architecture, I/O modes and interfacing, digital communication standards. The student will learn to program an 8-bit microprocessor (MC68HC11) in assembly language, and will develop the hardware and software for microprocessor-controlled applications. The student will be introduced to a 16-bit microprocessor (MC68000). Major differences between 8-bit and 16-bit microprocessors will be discussed. The lab portion of the course will concentrate on building, testing, and troubleshooting of digital systems including MC68HC11 and MC68000 based microcomputer systems, using oscilloscope, logic analyzer, signature analyzer and computer.

    Prerequisite: ELT 202 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of department.

    ELT 231 - System Control Electronics

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to motors and controls. Students are introduced to electromagnetic devices, transformers, DC and AC motor theory. Semiconductors and solid state electronics are also covered.

    Prerequisite: ELT 130.

    ELT 232 - System Electronics

    4 Credits

    This course introduces students to the use of analog and digital electronics in the control of electrical and nonelectrical processes. Students are introduced to the use of sensors, actuators, and control circuitry along with the use of micro-controllers in controlling various processes.

    Prerequisite: ELT 130 or PHY 231 or ELT 121.

    ELT 234 - Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers

    3 Credits

    An advanced level course that covers the programming and applications of a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). It will focus on program troubleshooting, hardware troubleshooting, data manipulation, math instructions, subroutines, and event-driven and time-driven sequences. Advanced topics such as HMI devices, PID, HMI, data communications, and SCADA will be discussed.

    Prerequisite: ELT 134

    ELT 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

EMS - Emergency Medical Services

    EMS 101 - EMS First Responder

    3 Credits

    This course is for non-ambulance professional rescuers who are first to arrive at an emergency medical scene to provide pre hospital care. The Certified First Responder uses a limited amount of equipment to perform initial assessment and intervention and is trained to assist and work side by side with other EMS providers. Topics covered are patient assessment, CPR review, airway, shock, wound management, full body immobilization, and initial treatment for other medical emergencies. Students successfully completing this course are eligible for New York State Department of Health Certified First Responder certification.

    EMS 109 - EMS First Responder Recertification

    1 Credit

    This course is for students who wish to update their knowledge and skills learned in EMS 101. In addition to assessment and treatment updates, the students will prepare for recertification as a New York State Certified First Responder by visiting topics of patient assessment, airway management, circulatory emergencies, trauma, and selected medical emergencies.

    Prerequisite and/or corequisite: EMS 101 or equivalent.

    EMS 110 - Emergency Medical Technician

    6 Credits

    This course is designed for students to become an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). The primary focus of the EMT is to provide basic emergency medical care, skills, and transportation for critical and emergent patients who access the emergency medical system. EMTs function as part of a comprehensive EMS response, under medical oversight. EMTs perform interventions with the basic equipment typically found on an ambulance. The EMT is a link from the scene to the emergency health care system. This course integrates knowledge of the EMS systems, safety/well being of the EMT, and medical, legal, and ethical issues, which is intended to improve the health of EMS personnel, patients, and the community. Successful completion of this course leads to eligibility to take New York State EMT Certification Exams.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    EMS 118 - EMT-Basic Core Review

    2 Credits

    This course is designed for New York State Certified EMTs to meet their recertification needs in reviewing the core material of the EMT Basic Curriculum. Material is presented in areas of Airway, Patient Assessment, Medical Emergencies, Behavioral Problems, Trauma, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, and Contemporary Issues in EMS. This course meets New York State requirements for 30 hours of core review described in the NYS Department of Health EMS Recertification through Continuing Education. This course will also cover the "Mandatory Optional Topics" of Weapons of Mass Destruction and Geriatrics

    Prerequisite: EMS 110 or EMS 119

    EMS 119 - Emergency Medical Technician Recertification

    3 Credits

    This course is for individuals who are certified as emergency medical technicians and need recertification for previously learned material while gaining new knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to be a competent, productive, and valuable member of the emergency medical services team. The course presents students with both a review and update of the topics covered in the Emergency Medical Technician course (EMS 110). This course consists of an optional written and practical skills challenge exam at the start of the class, which will help evaluate the current skill and knowledge of the refreshing EMT student and provide an opportunity for customization of the course to meet each EMT student's needs.

    Prerequisite: EMS 110 or equivalent.

    EMS 171 - Critical Trauma Care

    1 Credit

    This course contains practical and lecture material showing state-of-the-art assessment and treatment techniques for multiple system trauma victims. The course exposes the EMT to patient priority assessment and management concepts that are needed for successful outcomes for victims of life threatening trauma. Topics include rapid extrication, kinetics of trauma, expanded primary survey, the Golden Hour, and trauma centers. Must be an EMT.

    EMS 236 - Advanced Cardiac Life Support

    1 Credit

    This course prepares students for certification by the American Heart Association in Advanced Cardiac Life Support. It provides a systematic approach to the management of life threatening cardiac and respiratory emergencies. Must be a physician, physician's assistant, registered nurse, advanced level prehospital care provider, or student of these disciplines.

    Prerequisite: Must be a physician, physician’s assistant, registered nurse, advanced level pre-hospital care provider, or student of these disciplines

    EMS 239 - Paramedic Clinical and Field Experience I

    5 Credits

    This course provides the paramedic student with an opportunity to apply previously learned knowledge and skills in a supervised clinical setting. Rotations in this course include the emergency department, specialty hospital units, and prehospital experience. Students must demonstrate competence in certain skills during the course. Must be currently enrolled in the paramedic certification program.

    Prerequisite: EMS 270 previously completed or taken concurrently

    EMS 240 - Paramedic Clinical and Field Experience II

    7 Credits

    This course provides the paramedic student with an opportunity to apply previously learned knowledge and skills in a supervised clinical setting. Rotations in this course include the emergency department, medical and surgical intensive care, pediatrics and pediatric intensive care, labor and delivery, psychiatric, and prehospital experience. Student must demonstrate competence in certain skills during the course. Must be currently enrolled in the paramedic certification program.

    Prerequisite: EMS 239

    EMS 246 - Pediatric Advanced Care

    1 Credit

    This course presents concepts in advanced airway management and resuscitation of pediatric patients in the emergency setting. Specific topics include special pharmacology for pediatric patients, interosseous infusion, and cardiac resuscitation of pediatric patients. Completion also leads to eligibility for PALS certificate from the American Heart Association. This course contains content that is woven into the full program and is not just a standalone topic.

    Prerequisite: EMS 270 or equivalent.

    EMS 249 - Paramedic Review and Recertification

    4 Credits

    The Refresher program is a review of the original program in a condensed number of hours. The intent of this program is to maintain a student's competence in knoweldge and skill performance. The program embraces the same concept, but also encourages the inclusion of new and expanded information. New techniques and knowledge will be presented where appropriate. This course is not designed to be continuing education for participants. Must be certified as a paramedic.

    EMS 250 - 12-Lead EKG Interpretation in the Emergency Setting

    1 Credit

    Designed for the advanced pre-hospital EMS provider and other health professionals involved in treating cardiac patients in the emergency setting. Upon completion, students will be able to read and classify 12-lead EKGs. Topics include cardiac anatomy review, electrical physiology, axis determination, bundle branch and hemiblocks, 12-lead abnormalities, correlation between EKG changes and location of cardiac damage, and unique cardiac phenomenon. This course focuses strongly in Office and Emergency Settings to make triage and treatment decisions.

    Prerequisites: EMS 236 and PST 252.

    EMS 270 - Introduction to Paramedicine

    12 Credits

    This course is designed to prepare a person to care for the sick and injured at an advanced level of care. Persons must be currently certified as a Basic EMT to be accepted in this course. This course covers topics that include basic anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, respiratory emergencies, venous access and medication administration, airway management, medical documentation, cardiac emergencies, pediatric emergencies, caring for the elderly, and medical emergencies. This course integrates comprehensive knowledge of EMS systems, safety/well being of the paramedic, and medical, legal, ethical issues, which is intended to improve the health of EMS personnel, patients, and the community. This course is part of the first phase of a sequence that qualifies candidates to take the certification exam for Paramedic.

    Prerequisite: EMS 110.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    EMS 271 - Medical Care in Paramedicine

    8 Credits

    This course builds on the medical concepts learned in Introduction to Paramedicine. Topics include advanced patient assessment techniques, surgical airway procedures, cardiac care including external pacing and cardioversion, 12-lead EKG interpretation, and advanced medical care. Additional emphasis is placed on the EMT-P working as a team member, and identifying the limitations of paramedicine in the emergency medical setting.

    Prerequisite: EMS 270, and permission from the Emergency Services Department.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    EMS 272 - Advanced Trauma Issues in Paramedicine

    7 Credits

    This course presents material on the advanced concepts in trauma care needed for delivery of emergency medical care at the EMT-P level of practice. Current issues and techniques are covered. Specific topics include surgical airway techniques, chest decompression, advanced treatment for hypoperfusion, and special immobilization techniques. Work is also accomplished in the use of the United Incident Management System, and working with rescue personnel in delivery of care to patients who are entrapped.

    Prerequisite: EMS 270, and permission from the Emergency Services Department.

    EMS 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

ENG - English Literature

    ENG 105 - Introduction to Literature

    3 Credits

    An introduction to reading and analyzing these primary genres of literature: fiction, poetry, and drama. The course may also include creative nonfiction. Students will respond critically to readings of different historical and cultural contexts through class discussion and written evidence-based literary arguments. These contexts will include different worldviews, politics, classes, ethnicities, races, genders, or sexual orientations. Non-western perspectives will also be included.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101; or equivalent; or instructor permission (ENG 101 can be taken as a co-requisite).

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 108 - Literature of the Holocaust

    3 Credits

    A study of the Holocaust through a variety of genres, including poetry, novels, short stories, plays, memoirs, and children’s literature, in order to gain a better understanding of the ideas presented by the Holocaust as a significant event in world history. Students will study the origins and development of the Holocaust and its political, cultural, economic, and social implications through the lenses of a variety of writers.

    Prerequisite(s):ENG 101; or equivalent; or instructor permission (ENG 101 can be taken as a co-requisite)

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

    ENG 109 - Detective Fiction

    3 Credits

    Students will read classic and contemporary short stories and novels in sub-genres including golden age, hard-boiled, and police procedural by such authors as Christie, Chandler, Conan Doyle, and Grafton. Students will study the origins and development of genre as a vehicle to examine historical, social, political, intellectual, and cultural contexts.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101; or equivalent; or instructor permission (ENG 101 can be taken as a co-requisite) :

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 114 - The Young Adult Novel

    3 Credits

    The course will use various critical literary approaches to explore novels from the first Golden Age of children’s literature to its contemporary incarnation in the 21st century as a way to consider the transformation from child to adult and the global socio-cultural concept of the young adult. A variety of subgenres such as Realistic/Historical Fiction, Fantastic/Speculative Fiction, Mystery/Detective, Romance and Creative Nonfiction will be covered with attention given to motifs, archetypes, and themes in such literature. While the course will emphasize the traditional novel, the dominant genre in YA literature, additional genres such as the graphic novel, poetry, drama, and non-fiction will also be explored to properly contextualize the novel within Young Adult Literature as a whole. This course will center on written texts but may also include occasional references to films and other media.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101; or equivalent; or instructor permission (ENG 101 can be taken as a co-requisite)

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 115 - Fantasy Literature

    3 Credits

    An exploration of classic, modern and contemporary Fantasy Literature including reading, discussion and written analysis. Various subgenres such as High Fantasy, Magical Realism, Urban Fantasy and Mythic Fantasy will be explored by applying critical, social and historical context and analysis. Attention will be given to motifs, archetypes, themes and key figures/authors. This course will center on written text with occasional references to Fantasy in films and other media.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101; or equivalent; or instructor permission (ENG 101 can be taken as a co-requisite)

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 118 - Perpetrators, Victims, and Bystanders: Literature of Genocide

    3 Credits

    A study of the development of the major groups involved in a genocide, including perpetrators, victims, bystanders, upstanders, rescuers, and resistors through a variety of literary genres, which may include poetry, novels, short stories, plays, memoirs, movies, and children’s literature. Students will study the origins and definition of the term genocide and read literature from representative genocides such as Rwanda, Armenia, Cambodia, Iraq, The Holocaust, Darfur, and South Sudan.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101; or equivalent; or instructor permission (ENG 101 can be taken as a co-requisite).

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ENG 201 - Early British Literature

    3 Credits

    A survey of British literature from the early middle ages to the late eighteenth-century. Possible authors studied include Chaucer, Milton, Shakespeare, and Defoe.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, or placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 202 - Modern British Literature

    3 Credits

    A survey of British literature from the late 18th Century to the present. Focus moves from romantic optimism and the belief in progress to the disillusionment produced by industrialism and global war.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, or placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 203 - American Literature to 1865

    3 Credits

    A survey of American literature from the celebration of the new land in the Colonial Period to the Civil War. Readings and discussion focus on writers such as Franklin, Hawthorne, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Whitman, and Dickinson.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 204 - American Literature Since 1865

    3 Credits

    A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present, focusing on the changing values of an increasingly technological society. Includes the major literary philosophies of the time through writers such as Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, Baraka, and O'Connor.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 208 - Literature of the Bible

    3 Credits

    A study of the rich literary heritage found in both Hebrew and Christian scripture. The course focuses on such types as: saga, short story, poetry, gospel narrative and apocalyptic writings. Themes include the human struggle to understand the Divine and the nature of good and evil.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 210 - Literature of the Black Experience

    3 Credits

    Provides insight into the Black experience through the writings of such representative authors as Dumas, Pushkin, DuBois, Hughes, Wright, Ellison, Cleaver, and Baldwin.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 214 - The Short Story

    3 Credits

    A study of the development of the short story as a distinctive literary form. Includes writers such as Chekhov, Poe, Hemingway, Updike, Carver, O'Connor and Barthelme.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, or placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 215 - Children's Literature

    3 Credits

    A survey of classic and contemporary children's works from Aesop to Rowling. Students will analyze a variety of different genres such as fables, poems, myths, fairy tales, picture books, and novels with themes such as evil, escape, individuality, and the demands of society. Critical approaches such as historical, psychological, feminist, and Marxist theories may be discussed and applied to texts.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 with a C or better, or placement into ENG 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 216 - American Minorities in Literature

    3 Credits

    A study of authors whose literature provides a minority view of American life. Includes authors of African-American, Native American, Latino and Asian heritage, such as Hughes, Giovanni, Momaday, Storm, Thomas, Pereda, Yutang, Mori.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, or placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 217 - Women in Literature

    3 Credits

    Literature in which the roles of women are significant and help explain contemporary attitudes. The works for reading and discussion are selected from many cultures, and cover the period from Biblical to modern times.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, or placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 218 - Introduction to Shakespeare

    3 Credits

    Reading, discussion, and written analysis of several major plays and some of the sonnets. The course explores Shakespeare’s challenging language and the memorably rendered characters that populate his works, including kings, queens, lovers, shrews and fools. Themes such as power, revenge, love, jealousy, ambition and betrayal will be discussed. Critical approaches including psychological, feminist, and historical theories may be presented and applied to the texts.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, or placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 220 - Introduction to Dramatic Literature

    3 Credits

    A survey of drama from the ancient Greeks to the end of the 20th century, with emphasis on dramatic structure and style. The readings may include international writers such as Aristophanes, Marlowe, Goldsmith, Ibsen, O'Neill, Fugard and Childress.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, or placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 223 - Science Fiction

    3 Credits

    Reading, discussion, and written analysis of speculative fiction novels and short stories about human beings experiencing the changes resulting from science and technology. Representative authors from Shelley and Wells, through Clarke and Heinlein, to LeGuin and Delany.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, or placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 224 - Literature of Horror

    3 Credits

    Students will read classic, modern, and contemporary short stories and novels, with an emphasis on the historical development of the genre. Attention will be given to supernatural, psychological, and allegorical themes and tropes in such fiction, as well as relevant social and historical background information. The course will center on written fiction, with occasional reference to horror in films and other media.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, or placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 225 - Contemporary Poetry

    3 Credits

    A study of major poetry from 1940 through the 1990s. Emphasis is on technique and language, form and content. Selections are from poets as diverse as Frost and Ginsberg, Clifton and Rich, Plath and Cummings.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, or placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 226 - LGBTQ Literature

    3 Credits

    This course will include examination and analysis of short stories, drama, memoir, film, and graphic fiction by, for, and about LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) people’s lives and experiences. Focus will broaden to include cultural and social history of LGBTQ rights and visibility, and the LGBTQ-specific publishing industry. Coursework will include reading assignments, critical analysis and essays, and class discussions.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 with a C or better, or placement into ENG 200, or permission of instructor.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 230 - Mythology

    3 Credits

    Literary, cultural, psychological, and historical study of mythology including such cultures as Greek, Roman, Norse, Mid and Far Eastern, African, and mythologies of Americas. The course emphasizes creation, nature and hero myths as they shaped ancient civilizations and discusses how these myths affect global cultures today.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-H in addition to the other listed category below.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a C or better, or placement into English 200, or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    ENG 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

ENG - English Writing

    ENG 101 - College Composition

    3 Credits

    A course emphasizing college-level, source-based writing (summary, analysis, synthesis, research), with special attention to critical reading and thinking skills. Students will draft, revise, and edit multiple thesis-driven essays. They will also study and practice argument and persuasion. (ENG 101 or ENG 200 satisfy the composition requirement for graduation.)

    Prerequisite(s): Waiver of accuplacer reading and sentence level tests; placement into ENG 101 or ENG 200 (minimum score of 81 on reading test and minimum score of 65 on sentence level test); or completion of TRS 200 with a C or better; or completion of TRS 105 with a C or higher; or completion of ESL 201 with a C or higher, or ENG 200 placement. Co-requisite(s): REA 100 is required for students scoring between 71 and 80.9 on the Accuplacer reading test. Students may take REA 100 concurrent with ENG 101 or may take it prior to ENG 101. Students who take REA 100 before ENG 101 will need to earn a C or better in REA 100 in order to enroll in ENG 101.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-BC - Basic Communication (SCOM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-IL - Information Literacy (MIL)

    ENG 113 - Introduction to Creative Writing

    3 Credits

    An introductory, skill-building workshop to help students develop techniques that will prepare them to write the short fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and/or drama expected in ENG 213 Creative Writing. Emphasis is on developing observation skills, imaginative leaps, and formal techniques such as image, metaphor, symbol, character, conflict, dialogue, the poetic line, and setting/stage directions.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement into ENG 101.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 122 - Personal Writing

    3 Credits

    A writing workshop for students who want to explore the world of their own personal experience. The creative process will be emphasized as well as methods for shaping personal experiences into written expression, both formal and informal. Writing assignments will include journal writing, autobiographical writing, and other nonfictional narrative and descriptive compositions.

    Prerequisite(s): Placement exam at ENG 101 level.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    ENG 200 - Advanced Composition

    3 Credits

    Course focuses on written analysis, oral discourse, evaluation, argument and research. Assignments develop depth and proficiency in using language. Basic composition skills are assumed. (Can be taken in place of ENG 101 to satisfy the composition requirement for graduation.) This course may not be taken concurrently with ENG 101.

    Prerequisite(s): Waiver of Accuplacer Reading and sentence level tests; score of 100 or higher on reading test and 96 or higher on sentence level test; SAT reading score of 600 or higher, or ACT 26 or higher, or ELA regents 85 or higher or ENG 101 with a C or higher.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-BC - Basic Communication (SCOM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-IL - Information Literacy (MIL)

    ENG 213 - Creative Writing

    3 Credits

    A workshop approach for students interested in doing original writing of at least three of the following four genres: short fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and drama. Emphasis is on reading and analytical discussion of students' work.

    (Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 with a C or better, placement into ENG 200 or instructor permission.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 233 - Creative Writing Workshop-Poetry

    3 Credits

    A workshop designed for students interested in advancing their skills in writing poetry. Emphasis is on exploring different approaches to the genre and on drafting, workshopping, and revising original work within the genre of poetry.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 213 with C or higher (or permission of instructor).

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 243 - Creative Writing Workshop-Playwriting

    3 Credits

    A workshop designed for students interested in advancing their skills in writing plays. Emphasis is on exploring different approaches to the genre and on drafting, workshopping, and revising original work within the genre of playwriting.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 213 with C or higher (or permission of instructor).

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 250 - Professional Communication

    3 Credits

    Concentration on practical business and professional communication skills, including writing, speaking, and listening. Emphasis is on clarity, organization, format, appropriate language, and consideration of audience, for both written and oral assignments.

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or better or ENG 200 with a grade of C or better.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-BC - Basic Communication (SCOM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-IL - Information Literacy (MIL)

    ENG 251 - Technical Communication

    3 Credits

    Concentration on the writing and speaking skills necessary for the technologies. Emphasis is on preparation, organization, audience, and the effective use of format, supplements, and visuals. Accuracy, clarity, economy, and precision are stressed, for both written and oral assignments.

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C or better or ENG 200 with a grade of C or better. *These courses do not fulfill the requirements for a Literature elective.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    MCC General Education: MCC-IL - Information Literacy (MIL)

    ENG 253 - Creative Writing Workshop-Nonfiction

    3 Credits

    A workshop designed for students interested in advancing their skills in writing creative nonfiction. Emphasis is on exploring different approaches to the genre and on drafting, workshopping, and revising original work within the genre of creative non-fiction. Writing Intensive.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 213 with C or higher (or permission of instructor).

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 263 - Creative Writing Workshop-Short Fiction

    3 Credits

    A workshop designed for students interested in advancing their skills in writing short fiction, Emphasis is on exploring different approaches to the genre and on drafting, workshopping, and revising original work within the genre of short fiction. Writing Intensive.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 213 with C or higher (or permission of instructor).

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    ENG 273 - Creative Writing Capstone: Publishing and the Profession

    3 Credits

    This course seeks to familiarize students with the processes necessary to furthering their personal and/or professional development as creative writers. To this end, the course will introduce students to the submission process, to transfer opportunities, and to publishing/reading venues both in Rochester and around the country.

    Prerequisites: ENG 233 or ENG 243 or ENG 253 or ENG 263 with C or higher or permission of Instructor.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

ENR - Engineering Science

    ENR 153 - Mechanical Design and Prototyping

    4 Credits

    An introduction to solid modeling, computer aided manufacturing, the engineering design process, and machine shop operations. Students will use SolidWorks software to design parts and assemblies. CamWorks software will be used to create tool paths for common 2.5 axis milling operations. Prototyping will be done using manual and CNC mills, lathes, and a 3D printer. Parametric modeling techniques that preserve design intent with dimensioning, geometric relations, external references, equations, and design tables will be emphasized. A design-build project will require students to build a working prototype to the instructor's specifications and then implement a redesign of it. Students will document their design process in both written and oral reports.

    ENR 157 - Digital Systems

    4 Credits

    This course introduces the basic logic functions, components and methodologies used in the design of digital systems. Digital electronic topics will include the basic logic gates, Boolean algebra, number systems, digital arithmetic, combinational logic circuits, multiplexers, decoders and flip-flops and registers. Digital system applications will include counters, magnitude comparators, Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog conversions, feedback control, sensor interfacing and signal conditioning. Students will use schematic capture and VHDL programming to implement the digital systems on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) development board. Various add-on power supply and sensor boards will also be utilized in the laboratory component of the course. The course will culminate in a team design-build project requiring prototype demonstration, written documentation and presentation.

    Prerequisite: MTH 165 or higher.

    ENR 161 - Computing with Microsoft Excel and LabVIEW

    1 Credit

    Students will be introduced to methods for solving a variety of engineering related problems using Microsoft Excel and LabVIEW. Microsoft Excel topics will include functions, graphing, matrices, linear regression, statistics, and root finding. Students will use LabVIEW to create programs that include a variety of data types, functions, loop and case structures, and graphical user interfaces. LabVIEW programs will include linear algebra, graphing, and data analysis. The course will conclude with a design project using LabVIEW and LEGO Mindstorms robots. Students will prepare and deliver written and oral reports documenting their design process.

    Prerequisite: MTH 165 with a grade of C or higher, or MCC Level 9 Mathematics placement or higher.

    ENR 251 - Statics

    3 Credits

    Fundamentals of statics applied to problems of engineering interest. A vector algebra approach will be presented. Topics include equivalent force systems, equilibrium, structural mechanics, friction, properties of surfaces.

    Prerequisites: MTH 211; PHY 161 with a grade of C or higher.

    ENR 252 - Dynamics

    3 Credits

    Fundamentals of dynamics applied to problems of engineering interest. Topics include kinematics of a particle, kinetics of a particle, planar kinematics of a rigid body, and planar kinetics of a rigid body.

    Prerequisite: ENR 251 with a grade of C or higher.

    ENR 253 - Circuit Analysis 1

    4 Credits

    Basic electrical concepts including passive circuit element models, Kirchhoff's Laws, operational amplifier models, topological properties of circuits, complete response for RC, RL and RLC circuits; phasor concepts for RLC circuit driven by sinusoidal forcing functions. The laboratory will provide examples of these concepts. Offered in Spring during even numbered years.

    Prerequisites: PHY 161; MTH 212 or MTH 225 taken concurrently or previously completed.

    ENR 254 - Circuit Analysis II

    3 Credits

    A continuation of ENR253. Topics include complex power; complex frequency analysis; Laplace transform analysis; transfer functions; passive and active filter design and analysis; Bode plots; magnetically coupled networks; two-port networks; and Fourier series and transforms.

    Prerequisite: ENR 253 with a grade of C or higher.

    ENR 256 - Mechanics of Materials

    3 Credits

    Fundamentals of the theory of elasticity will be presented. Stress-strain relations will be applied to the study of the mechanics of deformable solids including the analysis of beams, shafts, and columns, and the use of energy methods.

    Prerequisite: ENR 251 with a grade of C or higher.

    ENR 258 - Thermodynamics

    3 Credits

    The fundamental concepts of thermodynamics and their application to pure substances. Topics include properties of pure substances, work, heat energy, the first law of thermodynamics, disorder, entropy, second law of thermodynamics.

    Prerequisites: MTH 211; PHY 161 with a grade of C or higher.

    ENR 259 - Engineering Design Lab

    1 Credit

    Students will work in teams to solve an engineering design problem of their choice subject to approval from the instructor. Students will be encouraged to choose a project from an intercollegiate engineering design competition. Teams will design and build a working prototype, keep an engineering notebook, submit a weekly time sheets, create a final design report, and make a final oral presentation.

    Prerequisite(s): CIT 112 or ELT 112 or ENR 153 or ENR 157 or MET 121 or OPT 151 or TAM 105 or TAM 141

    ENR 261 - Matlab Programming

    3 Credits

    A course that uses structured software programming techniques to implement problem solving methodologies and develop solutions to various engineering problems. Techniques such as numerical and statistical analysis, numerical methods, symbolic solutions and graphical techniques are applied in the solutions. Pseudo-code, and flowcharts are used to develop a structured approach to the problem solution which will often require the development of user-defined functions and decision making programming constructs utilized in short script files. Some larger projects may include the development of a graphical user interface (GUI) to handle the program inputs, solution options and outputs.

    Prerequisites: ENR 161 or CSC 101, each with a grade of C or better. Co-requisites: MTH 211 (or MTH 211 previously completed with a grade of C or higher)

    ENR 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

ESL - English For Speakers Of Other Languages (ESOL)

    ESL 100 - English for Speakers of Other Languages-Intermediate II: Reading Focus

    4 Credits

    This course emphasizes the development of reading comprehension of authentic, non-fiction material at the upper intermediate level and includes vocabulary study and discussions of current events in relation to American culture. Class and small group instruction.

    Prerequisite: Placement at high intermediate level on proficiency tests.

    ESL 120 - English for Speakers of Other Languages - Intermediate II: Integrated Skills

    7 Credits

    This course is designed to promote fundamental fluency in all skills through massive amounts of reading, writing, and oral activities, where the primary emphasis is on meaning. Students will read novels and write and revise a semester-long project on topics of a personal nature. Discussion, small group work, and email will play important roles.

    Prerequisite: Placement at high intermediate level on proficiency tests.

    ESL 125 - English for Speakers of Other Languages: Multi-Skills I

    3 Credits

    This course at the upper intermediate level aims to develop fluency in all skills through extensive reading, writing, and discussion. Internet resources will be used.

    Prerequisite: Placement at high intermediate level on proficiency tests.

    ESL 130 - English for Speakers of Other Languages - Advanced I: Integrated Skills

    7 Credits

    This course builds on the fluency gained in ESL 120. It is designed to promote the development of clarity and completeness in students' oral and written expression by massive amounts of extensive reading. Students will carry out a written research project related to a theme of their own choosing. The project will bring together data collected through library research and interviews. Discussion and small group work will play an important role.

    Prerequisite: ESL 100 and ESL 120 with a grade of C or better; or placement at a low advanced level on proficiency test; or permission of program coordinator.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    ESL 138 - English for Speakers of Other Languages: Pronunciation

    2 Credits

    This course raises awareness of common pronunciation difficulties encountered by non-native speakers of English. Students will be taught features of Standard American English Pronunciation. Students will practice target features in groups and receive individual feedback.

    Prerequisite: Placement at high intermediate level on proficiency tests, or permission of program coordinator.

    ESL 145 - English for Speakers of Other Languages - Multi-Skills II

    4 Credits

    A course at the higher level, that stresses the development of all skills, with particular emphasis on reading and writing. Instruction in a class and workshop setting, with special attention to individual needs.

    Placement at low-advanced level on proficiency tests required. Subsequent enrollment in ESL courses is determined by instructor recommendation or by testing.

    Prerequisite: ESL 125 with a grade of C or better; or placement at low-advanced level on proficiency test; or permission of Program Coordinator.

    ESL 158 - English for Speakers of Other Languages: Oral Communication

    3 Credits

    A course emphasizing the skills needed for effective communication in social and academic settings. Students will improve listening skills and oral fluency through discussion, role play, interviews, oral presentations, and aural activities using various media.

    Prerequisite: Placement at the low advanced level on proficiency tests, or permission of program coordinator.

    ESL 178 - Grammar In Writing

    2 Credits

    This course is designed to promote the development of grammatical accuracy through reading, writing, discussions, and formal instruction. Students will summarize and analyze grammar structures in academic material and focus on revising and editing their writing for correctness. They will also improve their fluency and their ability to identify grammatical errors through weekly in-class journaling.

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or higher in ESL 130 or ESL 145, or placement ad advanced level on proficiency test, or permission of program coordinator; ESL 201 taken concurrently or previously completed.

    ESL 201 - English for Speakers of Other Languages - Advanced II: Reading/Writing

    4 Credits

    This course emphasizes the continuing development of reading and writing through the process approach. It includes informal writing, paraphrasing, summarizing, as well as essay writing. Students will focus on revising their writing and editing for correctness.

    Prerequisite: ESL 130 or ESL 145 with a grade of C or better; or placement at Advanced Level on Proficiency Tests; or permission of program coordinator.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    ESL 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

FPT - Fire Protection Technology

    FPT 101 - Fire Behavior and Combustion

    3 Credits

    This course explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and are controlled. Topics include the basic principles of fire chemistry; the properties of solids, liquids, and gasses; the process of fire combustion; and fire behavior.

    FPT 102 - Fire Prevention and Inspection

    3 Credits

    The fundamental requirements of fire prevention. This course emphasizes the laws applied to fire prevention, including federal fire safety requirements for industry and commerce, solving technical problems encountered, recognition of hazards, prevention of fires and inspection techniques. Special attention is applied to life safety from fire in the home, school, public assembly, and all other places where people are assembled and endangered by fire.

    FPT 103 - Building Materials and Construction

    3 Credits

    Fundamentals of building construction methods and materials of construction. The approach is to study the stability of buildings and materials under fire conditions. The emphasis is upon safety under fire conditions and the technology of limiting fire spread in new and existing buildings.

    FPT 105 - History of the Fire Service

    3 Credits

    This course examines the historical evolution of the American fire service. The fire service has its roots in ancient Roman and European societies and has been shaped in the United States by historical fire events, improvement in equipment and technology, and notable leaders and innovators. An understanding of how it developed provides insight into its current structure, operation, and culture.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    FPT 107 - Introduction to the New York State Building Code

    3 Credits

    A course to acquaint the student with the New York State Uniform Fire Prevention and Building Construction Code and supporting reference standards. Students will be presented an overview of the code and will be able to confidently research design and modification issues pertaining to new construction, new use, remodeling, renovations, alterations, and repairs to buildings using the current New York State Building Construction Code.

    FPT 111 - Firefighter I

    7 Credits

    This course gives the firefighter the basic skills and education to work safely and effectively as a member of a fire fighting team. Topics include fire behavior, safety practices, use of self-contained breathing apparatus, personal protective equipment, use of fire-fighting appliances, hazardous materials first response at the operations level, and working as part of a fire-fighting team.

    Prerequisite: CPR certification is required.

    FPT 113 - Firefighter II

    3 Credits

    This course provides structural firefighters with the knowledge and skills required to respond to emergencies under general supervision of a company officer. Both hands-on use of fire training simulators and classroom presentations/activities are integrated in the course. Topics include incident command implementation, building materials and collapse, special rescue and vehicle extrication, hydrant flow and operability, hose tools, foam operations, flammable liquid/gases, detection, alarm systems, fire department communications, pre-fire planning, special situations, and fire suppression strategy and tactics.

    Prerequisite: FPT 111

    FPT 130 - Basic ARFF Class

    2.5 Credits

    This Basic Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) class is specifically designed to provide new airport firefighters with the basic skills and knowledge required to handle aircraft crashes and conduct fire suppression operations as they relate to rescue and fire extinguishment. Both hands-on use of the aircraft fire training simulators and classroom presentations will be provided to the students. The classroom presentation will provide familiarization of chemistry of fire, fire extinguishing agents, the Incident Management System (IMS), airport familiarization, aircraft types and familiarization, hazardous materials and cargo handling, and pre-incident planning/post incident operations. The skills application session will consist of conducting advanced rescue techniques, fire suppression operations in an aviation environment, application of firefighting foams on flammable liquids, and specialized apparatus and equipment operations.

    FPT 135 - Aircraft Fuel Spill Fire Fighting

    .5 Credits

    This course provides firefighters with the knowledge and skills to extinguish aircraft fuel spill fires, utilizing both classroom and live-fire extinguishment simulation. This course exceeds FAR 139 annual requirements for live fire training. Must have firefighter certification.

    FPT 136 - Specialized Aircraft Fire Fighting

    .5 Credits

    This course provides firefighters with the knowledge and skills to extinguish specialized aircraft fires, including fires in the cockpit, cabin, lavatory, engine, and brakes. This course utilizes both classroom and live-fire extinguishment simulation. This course exceeds FAR 139 annual requirements for live fire training. Must have firefighter certification.

    FPT 137 - Specialized Aircraft and Fuel Spill Firefighting

    .5 Credits

    Utilizing a mixture of classroom instruction and live fire training scenarios, this course provides ARFF firefighters with the knowledge and skills required for annual FAA Part 139 training. Both Spill and specialized aircraft system fires are extinguished utilizing vehicle turrets and hand lines.

    FPT 141 - Firefighter Core Competencies Update and Refresher I

    3 Credits

    This course is part of a three-course sequence which provides a systematic plan of study to assist firefighters to maintain their proficiency in core competencies and knowledge. Completion of the three-course sequence meets requirements for annual firefighter in-service training mandated by 19NYCR Part 426.7.

    Prerequisite: FPT 113 or equivalent

    FPT 142 - Firefighter Core Competencies Update and Refresher II

    3 Credits

    This course is part of a three-course sequence which provides a systematic plan of study to assist firefighters to maintain their proficiency in core competencies and knowledge. Completion of the three-course sequence meets requirements for annual firefighter in-service training mandated by 19NYCR Part 426.7.

    Prerequisite: FPT 113 or equivalent

    FPT 143 - Firefighter Core Competencies Update and Refresher III

    2 Credits

    This course is the third of a three-course sequence which provides a systematic plan of study to assist firefighters to maintain their proficiency in core competencies and knowledge. Completion of the three-course sequence meets requirements for annual firefighter in-service training mandated by 19NYCR Part 426.7.

    Prerequisite: FPT 113 or equivalent

    FPT 204 - Fire Service Strategy and Tactics

    3 Credits

    This course provides the principles of fire ground control through utilization of personnel, equipment, and extinguishing agents. Fire suppression and control of small, large, and special incidents is covered.

    Prerequisite: FPT 101.

    FPT 211 - Fire Investigation: Cause and Origin

    3 Credits

    A broad study of fire investigation is presented. The means to identify the origin and cause of a fire, properly conduct a fire scene investigation, and understand arson laws are emphasized. Topics include fire behavior, determining point of origin, ignition sources, fire scene investigation, and legal aspects of the discipline.

    Prerequisite: FPT 101 and FPT 103.

    FPT 212 - Fire Service Hydraulics

    3 Credits

    This course is a theoretical study to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and to apply hydraulic principles to analyze and solve water supply problems. The student can expect to apply the application of math and physics to the movement of water in fire suppression activities; analyze the community fire flow demand criteria; and demonstrate understanding of hydraulics, water characteristics, fluid pressure, hydrostatics, hydrokinetics, nozzle reaction, nozzle pressure, water distribution systems, sprinkler and standpipe systems, determination of required fire flow, fire service pump design, friction loss calculations, pump discharge pressures, parallel lines, Wyed lines, aerial stream calculations, fire streams, and the four hydraulic laws of friction loss.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 150 or higher, FPT 101, FPT 102, FPT 103, FPT 105.

    FPT 215 - Hazardous Materials Technician

    3 Credits

    This course prepares emergency response personnel to effectively and safely respond to hazardous materials incidents. Focuses include chemistry and toxicology of hazardous materials; the dangerous properties of chemicals; the use of detection instruments, confinement and containment procedures, including hands-on application; incident management and safety procedures; decontamination; and the selection and use of chemical protective clothing with hands-on practice. This course meets the training requirements of OSHA 1910.120 for the Hazardous Materials Technician.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    FPT 216 - Fire Service Instructor I

    3 Credits

    This course will prepare students to meet the requirements of a Fire Service Instructor, in accordance with NFPA 1041, "The Standard for Fire Service Instructor Professional Qualifications" 2012 Edition. Topics covered include: characteristics of an effective fire instructor, oral communications, adapting lesson plans, writing performance objectives, use of audio and other training aids, common classroom settings and arrangements, various testing instruments to evaluate teaching and learning efficiency, and meeting record keeping requirements. Students who successfully meet all the requirements of this course will be eligible to test national certification in Fire Service Instructor I.

    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101, FPT 101, FPT 102, FPT 103, FPT 105 or permission of instructor.

    FPT 220 - Fire Officer I

    3.5 Credits

    This course introduces the knowledge and skills necessary to function at the Fire Officer 1 level as defined in NFPA 1021. Areas covered include company operations at emergency incidents, basic supervision and leadership, transition to the role of supervisor, and other aspects of fire department operations and interpersonal skills.

    Prerequisite: FPT 111 or equivalent

    FPT 230 - Advanced Aircraft Rescue Firefighting

    2.5 Credits

    This class is designed to enhance the skills of the basic ARFF Firefighter. This training will place the firefighter above the minimum requirements and provide multi-faceted skills required to meet aviation fire protection demands. An extensive use of the aircraft fire training simulators and classroom presentations will be provided. The student will be introduced to rescue systems and equipment, tools and apparatus, airport facilities, chemistry of fire, foam systems, Incident Management System (IMS), and strategies and tactical considerations in fire suppression operations. The hands-on sessions will consist of conducting advanced rescue techniques and extrication of trapped victims, firefighting foams and mass applications, motor vehicle fires, structural fires suppression operations, water rescue, and advanced aircraft fire suppression.

    Prerequisite: FPT 130 or equivalent combination of training and experience.

    FPT 260 - Contemporary Issues in the Fire Service

    3 Credits

    This course examines current issues, opportunities, and problems facing the fire service. Topics such as contemporary fire service management issues, fire protection technology advancements, homeland security and terrorism preparedness, special operations, special situation strategy and tactics, current areas of research, and societal influences are addressed.

    Prerequisite(s): FPT 101, FPT 102, and FPT 105; all with a grade of C or higher.

    FPT 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

FRE - French/Foreign Language

    FRE 101 - Elementary French I

    3 Credits

    Designed for students with no previous experience in the language with focus on communicative skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes high frequency vocabulary, basic constructions, common phrases, and cultural aspects. Also stresses student participation in skills development. FRE 111 is strongly recommended for oral fluency, especially for students transferring to four-year institutions.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    FRE 102 - Elementary French II

    3 Credits

    Continuation of FRE 101 with emphasis on basic language skills for communication and on cultural aspects to promote understanding and appreciation of French culture. FRE 112 is strongly recommended as a companion course to develop oral fluency, especially for students transferring to four-year institutions.

    Prerequisite: FRE 101 or one year of high school French or equivalent.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    FRE 111 - Elementary French Conversation I

    2 Credits

    Intensive participation in the spoken language to develop and improve oral fluency in conversation. Strongly recommended as a companion course to FRE 101 especially for students transferring to four-year institutions.

    Corequisite: FRE 101, or some previous study of French.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    FRE 112 - Elementary French Conversation II

    2 Credits

    Intensive participation in the spoken language to develop and improve oral fluency in conversation, especially for students transferring to four-year institutions.

    Prerequisite: FRE 102 taken concurrently, or one year high school language, or FRE 101.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    FRE 203 - Intermediate French I

    3 Credits

    Communication skills in French for students with foundational experience in the language. Cultural topics are included in the development of practical language skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. A companion course, FRE 213 is strongly recommended for improving oral fluency, especially for students transferring to four-year institutions.

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 102, or successful completion of high school French 4, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

    FRE 204 - Intermediate French II

    3 Credits

    Continuation of FRE 203 with an emphasis on the development of linguistic skills and cultural understanding for students with some competency in the language. The companion course FRE 214 is strongly recommended for improving oral fluency, especially for students transferring to four-year institutions.

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 203 or excellence in high school French 5, the equivalent or permission of instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

    FRE 213 - Intermediate French Conversation I

    2 Credits

    A communicative approach to develop comprehension of the spoken language and ability to communicate with native speakers at the beginning intermediate level. French spoken by native speakers from France, Quebec and Africa will be used to train students for real life communication appropriate for social and career related situations. To develop linguistic skills, intensive training in comprehension and communication will be enhanced by the use of video and audio materials, and interactive websites. Language structures will be practiced in context using related text materials and culture, as well as topics of interest such as current events. Students will be evaluated on their linguistic achievement and performance, their level of aural comprehension and conversational competence at this intermediate level of communication.

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 203 taken concurrently, or successful completion of high school French 4, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

    FRE 214 - Intermediate French Conversation II

    2 Credits

    A communicative approach to develop comprehension of the spoken language and ability to communicate with native speakers at the beginning intermediate level. French spoken by native speakers from France, Quebec and Africa will be used to train students for real life communication appropriate for social and career related situations. To develop linguistic skills, intensive training in comprehension and communication will be enhanced by the use of video and audio materials, and interactive websites. Language structures will be practiced in context using related text materials and culture, as well as topics of interest such as current events. Students will be evaluated on their linguistic achievement and performance, their level of aural comprehension and conversational competence at this intermediate level of communication.

    Prerequisite(s): FRE 204 taken concurrently, or successful completion of high school French 5, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

    FRE 221 - Francophone Culture On Location

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide the opportunity to see and experience the richness of a French speaking country through the unique experience of travel. The core part of this course will be a stay in the country, with visits to the main cities and cultural centers. Class meetings prior to the trip will focus on topics that will help the student to prepare for the experience, and meetings after the trip will provide a time for debriefing, reporting, evaluation, and assimilation. The student is expected to complete ten tasks during his/her stay, make an oral presentation, and prepare a portfolio of the trip. This portfolio can be a personal journal, photo display, video recording, or a combination thereof.

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

FSA - Food Service Administration

    FSA 103 - Culinary Arts I: Fundamentals of Food Preparation

    5 Credits

    The course covers instructions in the foundations of culinary arts, including food theory, demonstrations and hands-on cooking. Students will engage in various food preparation techniques and will sample their culinary creations.

    Prerequisite: FSA 106 (may be taken concurrently or previously completed)

    FSA 106 - Food Safety and Sanitation

    1 Credit

    Basic sanitation principles, ways to apply the principles in practical situations, and methods for training and motivating food service personnel to follow good sanitation practices. Certification is awarded by the National Education Foundation of the National Restaurant Association upon successful completion of the national examination.

    FSA 107 - Menu Planning

    3 Credits

    A hands-on approach to planning, creating, and maintaining effective menus. Discussions include menu items and placement, food costing and creative menu designs for visual appeal. Menu planning and design software may be utilized.

    Prerequisite: MCC math placement level 2 or higher, or TRS 092 with a grade of C or higher.

    FSA 108 - Principles of Healthy Cooking

    3 Credits

    Through this combination lecture and hands-on laboratory course, students will become familiar with basic nutrition principles upon which healthy menus can be built. Students will learn techniques and ingredient selection for preparing healthy classical and modern cuisine, as well as how to analyze and modify the nutrient content of recipes.

    Prerequisite: FSA 106 (may be taken concurrently or previously completed).

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    FSA 110 - Principles of Baking-Bread Products and Cookie Doughs

    3 Credits

    This course covers instruction in the foundations of baking including theory, demonstrations and hands-on cooking. Students will engage in various bread and cookie preparation techniques including quick breads, yeast breads, enriched and laminated doughs, as well as a variety of cookie mixing methods. They will sample and critique their culinary work.

    FSA 111 - Principles of Baking-Pastries and Confections Products

    3 Credits

    This course covers instruction in the foundations of baking and confectionery, including theory, demonstrations and hands-on cooking. Students will explore various pastry preparation and cooking techniques, as well as a variety of confections, pies, tarts, syrups, icings, sauces, custards, creams, and chocolates. They will sample and critique their culinary work.

    FSA 117 - Basic Consumer Nutrition

    3 Credits

    A lecture course that will present information on nutrients and their use by the body. Topics include digestion, usage of nutrients, consequences of nutrient deficiencies or excesses, energy production and analysis of individual diets. Current research is integrated into the course. Depending on program requirements, this course can meet both Food Service (FSA 117) or Natural Science (BIO 117) elective or course requirement. A student may earn credit for BIO 117 or FSA 117, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a natural science elective.

    MCC General Education: MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    FSA 203 - Culinary Arts II: Advanced Food Preparation

    5 Credits

    A laboratory class in which the students supervise and run "The-Heart-of-the-House" commercial kitchen. Opportunities to practice "Back-of-the-House" management skills and menu development is employed here. The students will rotate job responsibilities between two kitchens to ensure familiarity of every facet of the operation and produce food for real diners.

    Prerequisites: FSA 103 with a grade of C or better and FSA 106 with a grade of C or better, or permission of Department.

    FSA 205 - Purchasing, Storage and Handling

    3 Credits

    A survey of the wide range of purchasing principles to include selection and procurement, specifications, and standard units of purchase. Discussion will include standard bid methods, government regulations, and evaluation of new technology as it impacts the purchase function. The processes of receiving, storing and issuing will also be addressed.

    FSA 209 - Bar Management

    3 Credits

    An overview of the entire beverage industry, including alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages, is provided. Discussions to include the study of beverage operations and their laws. Purchasing, storage, handling, pricing, as well as service techniques are covered.

    FSA 230 - International Cuisine: Advanced Food Prep

    3 Credits

    A hands-on laboratory experience to provide students the opportunity to operate a successful food service operation based on the preparation and service of dishes that represent a variety of the world's cultures. Students will work in teams to research specific regions, develop appropriate production methods, and market and produce an authentic prix fixe menu to serve to the college community and the public.

    FSA 103 with a grade of C or better and FSA 106 with a grade of C or better, or permission of department

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    FSA 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

GEG - Geography

    GEG 100 - Physical Geography I Laboratory

    1 Credit

    Physical Geography I Lab explores the hands-on, practical applications of basic knowledge gained in the companion course, GEG 101 Physical Geography I. Exercises involve use of maps, atlases, and scientific equipment to observe, measure, and analyze the spatial significance of natural phenomena on and near Earth’s surface.

    NOTE: This course only meets SUNY General Education Natural Science requirements when both GEG 100 and GEG 101 are successfully completed.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

    GEG 101 - Physical Geography I

    3 Credits

    Physical Geography is the science concerned with the spatial aspects and interactions of the physical elements and processes that make-up the environment. GEG 101 is an introductory course presented through two of Earth’s major spheres: the atmosphere and hydrosphere. Topics include Earth/Sun relations, Earth’s energy budget, atmospheric temperature, moisture and precipitation, winds, weather, climate, and Earth’s water.

    NOTE: Students who successfully complete GEG 101 may, with the addition of GEG 100 Physical Geography I Laboratory, complete the requirement for SUNY Natural Science General Education. GEG 100 may be taken concurrently or in a later semester, but the student will not have satisfied the SUNY requirement until both GEG 101 and GEG 100 are successfully completed. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a natural science elective.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

    GEG 102 - Human Geography

    3 Credits

    Human geography is the spatial analysis of human populations, their cultures, their activities and behaviors, and their relationship with, and impact on, the physical landscapes they occupy. As an introductory survey course, GEG 102 is presented through three major themes: Cultural geography, population geography, and political geography. Topics include cultural evolution, popular and folk culture, cemeteries, languages, religions, demographics, overpopulation, migration, nationalism, and international political systems.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-SS in addition to the other listed category below.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    GEG 103 - Extreme Weather Lab

    1 Credit

    Extreme Weather Lab explores the hands-on, practical applications of basic knowledge gained in the companion course, GEG 104 Weather and Climate. Exercises involve use of maps, atlases, weather maps and charts, radar and satellite data, observational weather data and measure, and using the above mentioned for creating an operational weather forecast. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a natural science elective.

    This course only meets SUNY General Education Natural Science requirements when both GEG 103 and GEG 104 are successfully completed

    Prerequisite or co-requisite: GEG 104.

    Learning Attributes: GR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    GEG 104 - Extreme Weather (formerly Weather and Climate)

    3 Credits

    Weather is the scientific study of atmospheric processes and patterns, and their impact on human activities. This introductory meteorology course examines the collection and analysis of meteorological data at local, regional, and global scales. Topics include heat, moisture, and wind dynamics of the atmosphere; application of satellite and radar data; development and impact of thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes; weather analysis and forecasting. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a natural science elective.

    NOTE: Students who successfully complete GEG 104 may, with the addition of GEG 103 Extreme Weather Laboratory, complete the requirement for SUNY Natural Science General Education. GEG 103 may be taken concurrently or in a later semester, but the student will not have satisfied the SUNY requirement until both GEG 103 and GEG 104 are successfully completed.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEG 110 - Physical Geography II Lab

    1 Credit

    Physical Geography II Lab explores the hands-on, practical applications of basic knowledge gained in the companion course, Physical Geography II (GEG-111). Exercises involve use of maps, atlases, GPS units, and other geographic tools to observe, measure, and analyze the spatial significance of Earth’s plants, animals, and landforms. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a natural science elective.

    NOTE: This course only meets SUNY General Education Natural Science requirements when both GEG 110 and GEG 111 are successfully completed.

    Corequisite of Physical Geography II (GEG-111). Students that take GEG 110 are required to be taking or have taken GEG 111.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEG 111 - Physical Geography II

    3 Credits

    Physical Geography II is the study of spatial patterns and natural processes on Earth. As an introductory course, GEG 111 explores where and why plants, animals, and landforms occur where they do. Students will develop a better understanding of the natural environment and our role within it. Key topics include maps and map making, plants and animals (biogeography), as well as landforms (geomorphology) caused by volcanoes, earthquakes, glaciers, and rivers. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a natural science elective.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEG 130 - Digital Earth

    3 Credits

    Introductory geospatial skills will be covered, including geography, as well as hands on use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS), GPS, and remote sensing. Topics such as sustainability, renewable energy, and the economy will be integrated into the course through the use of GIS. One project will provide students the opportunity to use geospatial technology and real data to create original maps that begin to provide a solution to a real world problem. Prior computer knowledge such as creating, saving, deleting, and locating files on a PC, as well as preparing and printing Microsoft Word documents, using Microsoft Excel spreadsheets, creating Microsoft PowerPoint slides, using e-mail and the Internet will be required to be successful in this course. A sustainability elective (GR). This is a lab course. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a natural science elective.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    GEG 131 - Cartography

    3 Credits

    This course introduces fundamental cartographic concepts. Upon completion of this course, successful students will be able to employ design principles to create effective visual representations of geographic data (e.g. maps) in different formats (e.g. hardcopy, digital, web). Specific topics include map element design, typography, label design, selecting appropriate color schemes, and symbology. Basic computer skills will be required to be successful in this course.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    GEG 133 - Introduction to Remote Sensing

    3 Credits




    Introduction to the fundamentals of Geospatial Technology, with a focus on remote sensing but also including Geographic Information Systems (GIS), global positioning system (GPS), cartography, and spatial analysis. Students will be guided through a series of lectures and hands‐on computer‐based exercises. An end of a semester project will allow students to work on a project of their own design. Course material used are based upon the United States Department of Labor’s Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GCTM) for entry level geospatial occupations including Geospatial or GIS Technicians or Technologists. Prior computer knowledge or GIS experience will be required to be successful in this course. This is a lab course.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    GEG 200 - World Regional Geography

    3 Credits

    World Regional Geography is a broad exploration of the physical and human geography of Earth. As a survey course, GEG 200 examines the cultural, economic, environmental, and political characteristics of the world’s regions from a geographic perspective. Major topics include population, political and economic systems, development, globalization, areas of conflict, environmental issues, and current events.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    GEG 201 - Geography of United States and Canada

    3 Credits

    Physical and human geography of the United States and Canada with emphasis on the demographic, cultural, and economic aspects of individual regions. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a social science elective. This is not a natural science.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    GEG 203 - Extreme Climate Laboratory formerly GEG 252

    1 Credit

    Central to understanding the predictions for future global warming is identifying the key components that operate within the climate system. This laboratory is designed to provide students with the tools necessary to understand the science behind global warming. Students will take the role of climate investigators and learn how changes in the climate system are analyzed through the use of simple models. Ultimately students will gain an understanding of how factors that affect climate are used to construct a geographical pattern of future warming on a global scale. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a natural science elective. NOTE: This course only meets SUNY General Education Natural Science requirements when both GEG 204 and GEG 203 are successfully completed.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEG 204 - Extreme Climate

    3 Credits

    This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding future changes in the Earth’s climate. Students will learn how the Earth’s climate system operates and gain an informed perspective of future global climate change. Topics include measuring changes in greenhouse gases, tools used in modeling and interpreting past climate, ice ages, recent global warming, future climate projections, strategies to potentially slow and stabilize climate change, and the outlook of our future energy use. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a natural science elective. NOTE: Students who successfully complete GEG 204 may with the addition of GEG 203, complete the requirement for SUNY Natural Science General Education.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEG 211 - Economic Geography

    3 Credits

    Economic Geography is the study of the location of economic activities, the spatial patterns of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, and the ways humans support themselves. GEG 211 is presented through four major themes: political geography, location theory, urban geography, and economic development. Topics include agriculture, industry, services, and resource issues.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    GEG 215 - Geography of Tourism Destinations

    3 Credits

    Geography of tourism destinations is the analysis of human leisure behavior and its socioeconomic impact, and includes the exploration of major tourism attractions and destinations on Earth. This survey course is presented through two major themes: thematic tourism geography and regional tourism geography. Topics include demand and resources for tourism, climate, transportation, spring-break, cruises, all-inclusive resorts, "sin" and "lifestyle" tourism, Rochester's tourism development, and an overview of major travel destinations across the globe.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    GEG 218 - Political Geography

    3 Credits

    Analysis of the geographics and politics of the state, everyday life, political regions, demographics, the emergence of the modern state system, contemporary international relations and ecological issues. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a social science elective and does not fulfill the natural science elective.

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    GEG 220 - Geography of Genocide

    3 Credits

    Geography of Genocide is the spatial analysis of modern acts of genocide and other crimes against humanity. As a survey course, GEG 220 is presented through four major themes: cultural, economic, physical, and political geography. Major topics include the Ottoman mass murder of Armenians, the Holodomor, the Holocaust, Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge, “ethnic cleansing” in the former Yugoslavia, and the genocide in Rwanda. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a social science elective.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    GEG 230 - Spatial Analysis and GIS

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to geospatial analyses that are used for problem-solving and decision-making. Students will learn how to perform these analyses using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software (i.e. Esri ArcGIS). As a guiding framework, this course shows how GIS is used to answer fundamental questions in geography that are related to problem-solving and decision-making in a wide range of careers and academic disciplines. Students will be introduced to Python and learn a few introductory scripting commands for automating geospatial processes. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to make informed decisions when choosing GIS-based approaches for conducting geospatial analyses, and be able to create basic scripts to automate GIS workflows.

    GEG 130 with a grade of C or higher

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    GEG 239 - Capstone in Geospatial Technology

    2 Credits

    The capstone is a learning experience resulting in a consolidation of a student's educational experience and certifies mastery of entry level workplace geospatial technician competencies unique to western New York’s GIST market. The capstone experience should occur towards the last semester of the student's educational program. Methods of the capstone experience include: a final learning experience that allows a student to apply broad knowledge of the discipline; a comprehensive examination prepared by the faculty of the geospatial education program; and a course involving simulation of the workplace (mobile GIS), case studies, service learning, internships, or employment scenarios. Students will develop a personal GIS portfolio highlighting their Capstone experience that provides evidence of their geospatial competency, and will learn how to compile, analyze, and present geospatial data while emphasizing the value of visual communication.

    Prerequisites: GEG 101, GEG 130, GEG 131, and GEG 133, all with a grade of C or higher. Co-Requisite GEG230.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    GEG 290 - Independent Study

    3 Credits

    See the Department Chairperson.

GEO - Geology

    GEO 101 - Physical Geology-GR

    4 Credits

    This course focuses on the Earth's composition, features, and processes, including volcanoes, earthquakes, minerals, rocks, glaciers, caves, landslides, rivers, mountain building, and plate tectonics. Two field trips to study local geology are incorporated into lab each semester.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEO 102 - Historical Geology

    4 Credits

    Historical Geology is the study of the history of Earth and life through time. It addresses the Earth's origin, evolution, changes in the distribution of lands and seas, growth and destruction of mountains, succession of animals and plants through time, and the developmental history of the solar system.

    Prerequisite: GEO 101 or permission of instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEO 103 - Great Mysteries of the Earth

    3 Credits

    This course investigates Earth mysteries to gain an understanding of the differences between science and pseudoscience. The student will learn and use critical thinking skills, logic, and the scientific method of inquiry to better understand allegedly unexplainable phenomena. This course will investigate topics related to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, extinction events, early engineering structures, plate tectonics, climate concerns, legendary creatures and enigmatic landforms.

    MCC General Education: MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEO 105 - Astronomy

    3 Credits

    An introduction to general astronomy. Topics include: solar system, stellar energy, stellar evolution, galaxies, the universe and constellation identification. NOTE: Students who successfully complete GEO 105 may, with addition of GEO 115, complete the requirement of SUNY Natural Science General Education. GEO 115 may be taken concurrently or in a later semester, but the student will not have satisfied the SUNY requirement until both GEO 115 and GEO 105 are successfully completed.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEO 106 - Introduction to Oceanography

    3 Credits

    An introductory course which will survey ocean sciences. Geological, chemical, physical, and biological processes and interrelationships will be examined.

    MCC General Education: MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEO 108 - Dangerous Earth

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the destructive power of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanos, hurricanes, tornadoes and related phenomena. The origin and occurrence of such hazards will be examined. Recent disasters as well as catastrophic events in the Earth's past will be utilized as case studies. Methods of prediction and strategies for minimizing loss of life and property will be emphasized.

    MCC General Education: MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEO 115 - Introductory Astronomy Laboratory

    1 Credit

    This course explores the hands-on, practical applications of basic knowledge gained in the companion course, GE0 105. Exercises involve use of telescopes, observation of stars and constellations, stellar spectra, Hubble red-shift, astrophotography, and computer based exercises. NOTE: This course only meets SUNY General Education Natural Science requirements when both GEO 105 and GEO 115 are successfully completed.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEO 116 - Special Topics in Geosciences

    1-3 Credits

    This course is designed to address specific topics of interest in the geosciences. Examples of potential course offerings could include volcanology, mineralogy, climate change, or the study of a particular geographic region. Topics may change from semester to semester based on faculty and student interest. Primarily lecture format, but field experiences may be included.

    GEO 200 - Geology of the National Parks

    4 Credits

    This lecture and laboratory course explores the geological processes and earth history responsible for the development of the iconic landscapes found within the National Parks System, including Arches, Bryce Canyon, Grand Canyon, Great Smokies, Mammoth Cave, Shenandoah, Yellowstone, Yosemite, Zion National Parks, and others.

    Prerequisite: GEO 101 or permission of instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEO 203 - Geomorphology

    4 Credits

    A study of the genesis of land forms, resulting from the action of running water, glaciers, waves, wind, ground water, and other gradational agents. The approach is analytical in terms of structure, process, and stage. Alternate Spring semester only (of odd years).

    Prerequisite: GEO 101 or permission of instructor.

    MCC General Education: MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEO 204 - Introduction to Mineralogy

    4 Credits

    A study of the formation, occurrence and association of minerals with an emphasis on mineral identification through the study of their chemical, physical and crystallographic properties.

    Prerequisites: GEO 101 and CHE 100 or permission of the instructor.

    GEO 210 - Environmental Geology

    4 Credits

    This lecture and laboratory course will center around an in-depth discussion about the environment as related to resources, wastes, pollution, and geologic hazards. The consequences of use and misuse of our geologic environment will be stressed and explored in more depth in weekly laboratories. Course offered Spring of even years.

    Prerequisite: GEO 101

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEO 220 - Geology of New York State

    4 Credits

    The geological history of the state will be studied chronologically from the Precambrian Eon to the Pleistocene Epoch. The geology of Monroe County and the Genesee River region will be stressed.

    Prerequisite(s): One semester of physical geography OR any geology course is recommended except GEO 103 or GEO 105.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    GEO 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

    GEO 295 - Field Studies in the Geosciences

    Variable Credit

    This course is designed for students who wish to study a specific geologic or geographic topic or locality in a focused, hands-on, field setting. A significant portion of the course work is completed in the field at a local or distant location depending upon the title and focus of the course for a given semester. Students will make field observations, create sketches, record data, and construct a field notebook detailing all aspects of their field experience. The course title will have a sub-title attached to it for any given semester identifying the field setting for that semester. Two examples include "Field Studies in the Geosciences/Volcanic Landscapes of the Western US" or "Field Studies in the Geosciences/Geologic History of the Pacific Northwest". Additional fees for travel, lodging, food, and other field expenses may apply.

    Prerequisites: One Geology or Geography class preferred; permission of the instructor(s) required

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

GER - German/Foreign Language

    GER 101 - Elementary German I

    3 Credits

    Designed for students with no previous experience in the language. Focuses on communicative skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes high frequency vocabulary, basic constructions, common phrases, and cultural aspects. Also stresses student participation in skills development. GER 111 is strongly recommended for oral fluency especially for students transferring to four-year institutions.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    GER 102 - Elementary German II

    3 Credits

    Continuation of GER 101 with emphasis on basic language skills for communication and on cultural aspects to promote understanding and appreciation of German culture.

    Prerequisite: GER 101 or one year high school German or equivalent.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    GER 111 - Elementary German Conversation I

    2 Credits

    Intensive participation in the spoken language to develop and improve oral fluency in conversation, especially for students transferring to four-year institutions.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    GER 203 - Intermediate German I

    3 Credits

    Communication skills in German for students with foundational experience in the language. Cultural topics are included in the development of practical language skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.

    Prerequisite(s): GER 102, or successful completion of high school German 4, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

    GER 221 - Germanic Culture on Location

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide the opportunity to see and experience the richness of a German-speaking country through the unique experience of travel. The core part of this course will be a stay in the country, with visits to the main cities and cultural centers. Class meetings prior to the trip will focus on topics that will help the student prepare for the experience, and meetings after the trip will provide a time for debriefing, reporting, evaluation and assimilation. The student is expected to complete ten tasks during his/her stay, make an oral presentation, and prepare a portfolio of the trip. This portfolio can be a personal journal, photo display, video recording, or a combination thereof. Offered Intersession, Spring and Summer Semesters.

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

GLF - Golf Management

    GLF 115 - Introduction to Golf Management

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the golf industry. It also provides the student with an understanding of the etiquette, definitions and rules that govern the game of golf.

    GLF 117 - The Rules of Golf

    2 Credits

    This course is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of the rules of golf. The course will include instruction in the history of the rules, governing bodies, definitions, etiquette, and interpretation of the rules of golf. The student will learn how to identify the rule that applies to each situation, and how to interpret and apply the rule.

    GLF 118 - Golf Shop Operation

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the operation of a golf shop. It will address the services that may be provided by the golf professional for the members/customers. The following topics will be covered: driving range operation, lesson programs, merchandising, and other revenue producing strategies.

    GLF 122 - Golf Fundamentals and Methods

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide the student with the elements required for the development of a good golf swing, a detailed study in advanced short game and putting techniques, and with verbal and physical skills related to teaching the game of golf.

    GLF 126 - Introduction to Golf Equipment

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the characteristics and design of modern golf equipment. The student will study different fitting techniques and perform basic club repair functions.

    GLF 130 - Golf Course Maintenance

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the maintenance operations of golf courses and with an understanding of the equipment needed to operate a golf course.

    GLF 136 - Golf Shop Policies and Services

    3 Credits

    The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the day to day operation of a golf facility. It will include the purpose for and development of policies and procedures for operating a golf facility. Job responsibilities and management strategies will be explored, as well as the planning, organization, and implementation of golf events.

    GLF 140 - Introduction to Golf Science

    3 Credits

    This course will provide the basic information on the structure and function of the human body as it is applied in the golf swing. It will also provide the basic science used in the research and development of the implements and objects used in the game. That information combined will provide the student with the ability to qualitatively evaluate the swinging of the golf club. Basic Computer and Internet skills are required.

    GLF 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

GLS - Global Studies

    GLS 100 - Introduction to Global Studies

    3 Credits

    Individuals, local communities, business enterprises, and nation-states are today inextricably involved in and affected by global relationships. This course provides an overview of the emergence and characteristics of global, social, economic, political, and ecological interdependence, particularly as these developments are affected by rapid social and technological change. In analyzing global problems, students evaluate conventional interpretations, refine analytical frameworks, and consider alternative strategies for coping with planetary issues. Students also assess their individual needs in the context of human survival and global interdependence. A student may earn credit for SOC 210 or GLS 100, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses.

    Learning Attributes: WR, GR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

GSS - Gender and Sexuality Studies

    GSS 100 - Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies

    3 Credits

    This course serves as the introduction to the Gender and Sexuality Studies Degree and will provide students with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gender and sexuality. The course will introduce students to key concepts, theoretical perspectives and analytical tools developed by social scientists and feminist scholars in diverse fields of study. Through this course, students will examine historical movements and contemporary debates, especially as they pertain to the social construction of gender, structural inequalities, and the intersectionality of gender and sexuality with race, class, nationality and dis/ability. A student may earn credit for GSS 100 or SOC 100, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

HBR - Hebrew/Foreign Language

    HBR 221 - Israeli Culture on Location

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide the opportunity to see and experience the history and culture of Israel through the unique experience of travel. The core part of this course will be a stay in the country, with visits to the main cities and cultural centers. Class meetings prior to, or during, the trip will focus on topics that will help the student to prepare for and enjoy the experience. Meetings after the trip will provide a time for debriefing, reporting, evaluation and assimilation. The student is expected to complete ten tasks during his/her stay, make an oral presentation, and prepare a portfolio of the trip. This portfolio can be a personal journal, photo display, video recording, or a combination thereof. Offered during Intersession, Spring and Summer Semesters.

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

HED - Health Education

    HED 101 - Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Care

    1 Credit

    This course emphasizes how to recognize and care for breathing and cardiac emergencies for adults, children and infants, heart disease and injury prevention, two rescuer CPR, use of resuscitation mask and valve, and identifying and caring for life-threatening bleeding. The student will be eligible for American Red Cross Certification in Basic Life Support. American Red Cross Administrative Fee.

    HED 108 - Health, Family and Society

    2 Credits

    The focus of the course is to understand the societal influences and apply the concepts of wellness and holistic health within ourselves and our families. Specific issues will include multiple dimensions of health, prevention of lifestyle diseases, exploring choices that promote family and individual health and wellness, and creating a personal wellness plan.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    HED 110 - Disease Prevention and Healthy Lifestyles

    2 Credits

    This course is designed to identify factors that contribute to the most common lifestyle diseases (cardiovascular disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, chronic lung diseases, osteoporosis, anxiety and depression), and common infectious diseases (influenza, STI and HIV). Health promotion and disease prevention measures will be discussed with focus on nutrition, physical activity, emotional wellness, stress management, personal choices and behavior. Upon completion of the course the student will have a balanced health and wellness plan.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    HED 114 - Health and Safety in the Workplace

    2 Credits

    This course is designed to help facilitate a high level of well-being for the worker and aid the individual in achieving desirable health and safety practices in their life and profession. Topics explored include home, fire, motor vehicle, occupational, recreational, school, natural and man-made disasters, and personal safety and wellness. Emergency care procedures are presented and students will demonstrate competency in recognition and care for breathing emergencies for adults, children, infants, one and two rescuer CPR, use of resuscitation mask, bag, valve, Automated External Defibrillator (AED), identifying and caring for life-threatening bleeding, sudden illness, and injuries.The student will learn how to create a plan for safety and wellness and will have the opportunity to obtain American Red Cross certification in CPR, AED, and standard First Aid.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    HED 115 - Death and Dying

    3 Credits

    A study of the dying process, death, ceremonies and rituals in many cultures. Deals with issues of loss experiences, the fear of death, understanding reactions to death, near-death experiences, euthanasia, suicide, and current practices and trends in the care and treatment of the terminally ill.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-WC - Western Civilization (SWCV)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HED 116 - Issues in Child Development and Health

    3 Credits

    Explores health content areas, defined by the New York State Health Education Department, that affect the health and wellness of children. Issues, such as those that follow, are addressed from an educator's or caregiver's perspective: communication skills, family life, keeping kids active, safety education, death, substance use and abuse, school violence, childhood stress, nutrition, mental health and environmental factors. This course will include the development of a personal wellness plan as role modeling for children, and the opportunity for certification in identifying and reporting suspected child abuse/maltreatment, and Safe Schools Against Violence in Education Legislation.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HED 118 - Introduction to Safety and Emergency Care

    3 Credits

    This course emphasizes the key areas of safety, accident prevention and mitigation. Safety topics explored include home, fire, motor vehicle, occupational, recreational, school, personal fitness/wellness, and natural and man-made disasters. Emergency care procedures are presented and students will demonstrate competency in recognition and care for breathing emergencies for adults, children, infants, one and two rescuer CPR, use of resuscitation mask, bag, valve, Automated External Defibrillator (AED), identifying and caring for life-threatening bleeding, sudden illness, and injuries. Students will also create a personal wellness plan involving strategies for chronic disease and unintentional injury prevention as a part of safety and injury reduction. The student will have the opportunity to receive American Red Cross Certification in Basic Life Support and First Aid.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    HED 130 - Foundations of Personal Health and Wellness

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on personal responsibility for health, including lifestyle factors and their relationship to well-being, behaviors, disease and the implementation of a health behavior change plan utilizing a behavior change model. Health content areas spanning the dimensions of health and wellness are addressed, as well as health-related career options. This course satisfies part of the requirements for MCC Health and Wellness Coach eligibility and also includes the opportunity for certification in Identification and Reporting of Suspected Child Abuse/Maltreatment, and Safe Schools Against Violence in Education Legislation.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HED 207 - Emotional Wellness

    3 Credits

    This course examines emotional wellness from a holistic point of view integrating the physical, mental, emotional, social, and spiritual dimensions of health. It emphasizes evidence-based primary and secondary prevention strategies related to the tenets of emotional wellness established by the National Institute of Wellness. Topics include: self-esteem, physical activity and emotional regulation, character building and happiness, anger management, value-based living, meditation, relationships, spirituality and resilience.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HED 208 - Chronic and Communicable Disease

    3 Credits

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop a basic understanding of the nature and cause of human diseases, disabilities and death, and the educational interventions to prevent or control them. An epidemiologic approach will be used to study selected diseases/conditions. Common infectious diseases (influenza, pneumonia, HIV, STD's, hepatitis, meningitis, salmonella, childhood diseases), and chronic or lifestyle diseases (heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, arthritis, osteoporosis) will be explored. The current United States strategic plan for improving the nation's health will be reviewed and discussed in conjunction with the diseases/disorders presented.

    Prerequisite: HED 108 or HED 110 or HED 130.

    HED 209 - Drugs and Behavior

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to inform the student about the issue of chemical dependencies. Basic pharmacology and the effects of different psychoactive substances on the human body and how they impact physical and psychological health and wellness.The biological, psychological and sociological reasons for drug-seeking behavior will be discussed.Treatment,recovery,and prevention methods will be studied for effectiveness in physical health and wellness Topics pertaining to both legal and illegal drug use, abuse and dependency will be covered. This will be accomplished through the use of lectures, class discussions and reaction papers. The student upon completion will be able to develop their own personal health and wellness plan to live a substance abuse free life.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    HED 210 - Integrative Health and Wellness

    3 Credits

    This course provides an exploration and in-depth study into the field of integrative health and wellness from historical, political, economic and practical perspectives. Learners apply this knowledge base to the development of a variety of wellness coaching skills, such as consumer health navigation, wellness planning and motivational interviewing.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    HED 212 - Women's Health and Wellness

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on health and wellness issues pertinent to women in their young adult years through middle to late adulthood. The conceptual framework, based on elements of body, mind and spirit, will be used to explore common health and wellness issues (e.g. exercise, nutrition, stress, emotions, relationships, acute and chronic disease, making positive health and behavior choices as well as health-related consumer issues for women). Self-empowerment in relation to health promotion and disease prevention will also be stressed. Students will complete a Health and Wellness Assessment and create a Personal Wellness Plan.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

HEG - Health Education Global

    HEG 211 - Black Women's Mental Health and Wellness

    3 Credits

    Black women have disproportionately higher rates of many illness including hypertension, breast cancer, diabetes, lupus, heart disease, HIV, depression and so much more. This course will explore the socio-historical and cultural factors that impact the determinants of health for Black Women as compared to other populations. The intersectionality of Black Women’s lives and the impact on their mental, emotional, physical, social and spiritual wellbeing will be examined. This course will analyze the roles and identities of Black Women, their perception of health, wellness and illness and how these factors influence self-care practices.

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HEG 215 - Global Health and Culture

    3 Credits

    Global Health is emerging as a critical driver of world change and global sustainable development. This course explores the biosocial theoretical concepts and the historical contexts that are contributors to this shift and are influencing the establishment of global health as a stand alone discipline of study. This course focuses on challenging embedded assumptions about what actually supports good health and humane healthcare delivery and what actually causes poor health and disease in various cultures around the world. Topics include: history of 19th and 20th century medicine, population health, Global Burden of Disease, social health disparities, health care costs, indigenous healing cultures, contagious diseases, human rights, obesity, natural and complex disasters.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-SS in addition to the other listed category below.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD), MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

HEG - Health Professions

    HEG 200 - Multicultural and Diversity Influences in Health and Wellness

    3 Credits

    This course will investigate interdisciplinary perspectives and approaches that address complex multicultural and diversity impacts on health and wellness in contemporary society. Students will use self-examination, social analysis, case studies and competency building techniques to develop the critical knowledge, attitudes and skills necessary to recognize and understand the diversity of perspectives, needs, expectations and behaviors impacting health and wellness in multicultural populations in order to engage in effective, culturally congruent communication and develop positive interpersonal relationships.

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

HIM - Health Information Technology

    HIM 100 - Introduction to Health Information

    3 Credits

    Introduction to the health record profession, allied health professions, historical development of health care field and the present health care delivery system. Introduction to the health information department and its relationship to other hospital departments. Numbering and filing systems, record retention, duplication, and storage considerations are explored. Health care registries are explored. Health information science principles are applied in the laboratory setting.

    HIM 103 - Health Care Documentation

    3 Credits

    Introduction to the development, form, content, and evaluation of the health record. Introduction to hospital admitting department. Introduction to the organization, responsibilities, and committees of the hospital medical staff. Health record principles are applied in the laboratory setting.

    Prerequisite: HIM 100 with a grade of C or better.

    HIM 104 - Medical Terminology

    3 Credits

    A survey of the principles of medical terminology and word elements as a framework for a comprehensive medical vocabulary that can be applied in a professional setting. The course emphasizes methods used in health record documentation. Content includes detailed general and body system terminology, covering approximately 50+ terms per body system, as well as terminology used in pharmacotherapy, medical laboratory testing, and medical diagnosis. Computer programs, internet links, and comprehensive medical dictionaries will be used to enhance understanding of medical terminology.

    HIM 110 - ICD-10 Diagnostic and Procedural Classifications

    4 Credits

    This course will include the historical development of reimbursement, and emphasize the ICD-10 classification system. Course work will focus on official coding guidelines and use of ICD-10. Additional classifications are briefly studied. Instruction of coding issues by body system will be introduced, and laboratory includes coding exercises and application of coding principles.

    Prerequisites: BIO 134, HIM 103 and HIM 104, each with a minimum grade of C, or permission of the instructor.

    HIM 111 - CPT Procedural Coding System

    2 Credits

    This course will emphasize the American Medical Association's Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding system. Course work will focus on introductory outpatient coding with emphasis on evaluation and management, and surgery. Coding exercises will reference documentation guidelines and application of coding and reporting guidelines for outpatient services.

    Prerequisite: HIM 110 with a minimum grade of C, or permission of instructor.

    HIM 115 - Medical Office Pharmacology

    1 Credit

    Basic pharmacology terminology and concepts for the medical office professional. Topics include drug terminology, abbreviations, regulatory agencies, drug administration, dosage, effects, and use of drug references.

    Prerequisite/corequisite: HIM 104

    HIM 204 - Health Records in Alternate Care

    3 Credits

    The course will review trends and changes in the health care delivery system, an introduction to the types of non-hospital health care facilities and respective record keeping requirements, with emphasis on long-term, psychiatric, ambulatory, home care/hospice, and rehabilitative care.

    Prerequisite: HIM 111 with a minimum grade of C.

    HIM 205 - Professional Practice Experience I

    4 Credits

    Applied practical experience under the guidance of professionals in health information-related settings. Included will be a forum for Professional Practice experiences and professional development content including current issues in the health care and health information field; employment opportunities; the role of the Professional Practice Supervisor; personal development and presentation; assertiveness training/techniques; responsibilities and privileges associated with professional membership; HIT-related professional agencies; and professional resources on the internet, including use of AHIMA Virtual Lab. Enrollment in HIM 205 is conditional upon satisfactory completion of the medical requirements and clearance from any existing health problem(s). Continued enrollment is conditional upon satisfactory completion of each Professional Practice rotation.

    Prerequisite(s): HIM 111, BIO 134, BIO 135, and CRC 113 all with a minimum grade of C; and CRC 116 (may be taken concurrently).

    Learning Attributes: WR

    HIM 206 - Professional Practice Experience II

    4 Credits

    Continuation from HIM 205 with applied practical experience under the guidance of professionals in health information-related settings. Included will be a forum for Professional Practice experiences and professional development content including current issues in the health care and health information field, such as employment opportunities and search techniques; consulting for the health information practitioner; critique of department layouts, AHIMA certification exam application and preparation; continuing education requirements; and professional resources on the internet, including use of AHIMA Virtual Lab.

    Enrollment in HIM 206 is conditional upon satisfactory completion of medical requirements and clearance (by MCC Health Services). Continued enrollment is conditional upon satisfactory completion of each Professional Practice rotation. This course, is designated as "Writing Intensive," which will be reflected on transcript.

    Prerequisite: HIM 205 and HIM 208, each with a minimum grade of C.

    HIM 208 - Quality Improvement, Legal and Compliance Issues for the HIM Practitioner

    5 Credits

    This course will encompass a survey of accrediting, licensing, approving and certifying agencies affecting health care facilities, including the various accreditation programs of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations. Total quality management includes quality assessment, utilization management, risk management and credentialling. Additionally, the course will present to the student an introduction to the legal system, release of information, consents, administration of the law, evidence, torts, selected legal doctrines, the medical record in legal proceedings, liability of health care providers, current health legislation, and bioethical issues.

    Prerequisite: HIM 103 with a minimum grade of C.

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HIM 209 - Management, Supervision & Personal Development for the HIM Practitioner

    2 Credits

    This course will encompass an introduction to managerial concepts and functions, to include supervisory techniques, planning, organizing, actuating and controlling, leadership, motivation, forms design, and tools of management specifically developed for health care settings. Content also includes emphasis on development of oral and written communication skills.

    Prerequisite(s): HIM 205 and HIM 208, each with a minimum grade of C.

    HIM 211 - Healthcare Reimbursement

    3 Credits

    Course will acquaint the student with the cost of health care in the United States. Financial concepts related to health information systems will be discussed. Content includes instruction in health statistics and the use of medical information systems. Examination of data quality techniques necessitated by current reimbursement methodologies will be included. Computer applications in these areas will be utilized as appropriate.

    Prerequisite: HIM 208 and MTH 150 (or higher), each with a minimum grade of C

    HIM 213 - Health Information Systems

    3 Credits

    An introduction to health record applications, system design and security, and the health information manager's roles and responsibilities.

    Prerequisite(s): HIM 205, HIM 208 each with a minimum grade of C.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    HIM 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Program Director.

HIS - History

    HIS 102 - Introduction to African-American Studies

    3 Credits

    This is an interdisciplinary exploration of the experience and initiative of people of African descent throughout the world. Students will be introduced to the history, religion, sociology, politics, economics, creative production and psychology of African peoples, especially in the United States. In addition, the course introduces a variety of perspectives, theories, practical applications and methods of studying African peoples and their social evolution. A student may earn credit for HIS102 or AFS100, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 103 - African-American History I: to 1865

    3 Credits

    This course explores the history of African-Americans since they left their West African ancestral homeland to the moment they were emancipated following the Civil War. It emphasizes the brutalizing impact of the slave trade on its victims, slave life, the establishment of white supremacy, the strategies slaves adopted to transcend their ordeal and the achievements and contributions they made in America. In addition, the course deals with the fight for the emancipation of slaves and the steps leading up to the end of chattel slavery in America.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HIS 104 - African-American History II: since 1865

    3 Credits

    This is a survey of African-American history since Reconstruction era to present. It examines their epic journey as reflected in the decades of segregation, World War I, urban life in the north, the Great Depression, World War II, and the Civil Rights Movement. The course also covers the economic, social, cultural and political developments connected with the presidency of Barack Obama and the era of globalization.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HIS 109 - Global History I: to the 1500s

    3 Credits

    This course surveys the history of human societies around the world from the beginning to 1500. By examining the social, political, intellectual, and economic developments of world civilizations including Africa, the Americas, Asia, and the Middle East, students will obtain the historical knowledge necessary to live interdependently in a diverse global community.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-SS in addition to the other listed category below.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2), SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 110 - Global History II: Since the 1500s

    3 Credits

    This course surveys the history of human societies around the world from the 1500's to the present. By examining the social, political, intellectual, and economic developments of world civilizations including Africa, the Americas, and Asia, students will gain an appreciation of the extent and diversity of the history and cultures of the non-Western World.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-SS in addition to the other listed category below.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 111 - United States History I - to 1865

    3 Credits

    A survey of the origin of the clash between the colonies and Great Britain, the framing of the Constitution, Jacksonian Democracy and its influence on the American character, the slavery issue, the growth of industry and territorial expansion.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 112 - United States History II - since 1865

    3 Credits

    A survey of the reconstruction of the nation after the Civil War, the rise of industrial and urban dominance, the struggles affecting agriculture, industry and labor, the growth of the American empire, and the increasing role of government in American life.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 113 - Western Civilization I: Beginning to 1700s

    3 Credits

    A survey of western regimes, society (including the structures of the economy and social classes), and culture (including religious and philosophical ideas) and the west’s relationships with other societies and cultures from the ancient world to the Scientific Revolution. Topics may include Ancient Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, the development of Christianity, the development of the Islamic World, the Byzantine Empire, Medieval Europe, the Mongolian Empire, the Ottoman Empire, the Renaissance, the Reformation, the English revolutions of the 1600s, and the Scientific Revolution.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-WC - Western Civilization (SWCV)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 114 - Western Civilization II: 1700s to the Present

    3 Credits

    A survey of western regimes, society (including the structures of the economy and social classes), and culture (including religious and philosophical ideas) and the west’s relationships with other societies and cultures from the French Revolution to the present. Topics may include the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution and the revolutions it inspired, nation-building and nationalism, European imperialism, the World Wars, the Soviet Revolution, the Great Depression, decolonization, the Cold War and its end, and the unification of Europe.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-WC - Western Civilization (SWCV)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 153 - Traditional East Asian History

    3 Credits

    The course will survey the histories of China, Japan, and possibly additional East Asian countries up to 1600. Topics will include the developments of the Chinese and Japanese emperorships, the development of the Japanese shogunate, and the developments of East Asian philosophies and religions and other elements of East Asian culture.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 154 - Modern East Asian History

    3 Credits

    The course will survey the histories of China, Japan, and possibly additional East Asian countries from 1600 to the present. Topics will include the rise and fall of the Qing Dynasty, Edo Japan, the Meiji Restoration, World War II in Asia, the Chinese revolutions of 1911 and 1949, the Korean War, and postwar developments in East Asia.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 200 - Women in the United States: A Historical Perspective

    3 Credits

    This course surveys the diverse history of American women from European contact to the present, with special attention given to the extensive range of women’s experiences as shaped by race, class, ethnicity, gender and sexual identity. Women’s relationship to and their actions in both the private and public sectors will be studied, along with varying conceptions of womanhood. In addition, the course examines how women in the United States have both influenced and have been influenced by the political, economic, social, and cultural development of American civilization.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 211 - History of Sport in the United States

    3 Credits

    A survey of sport from its earliest Native American, African and European roots to the sport and games-oriented contemporary society. Professional, amateur and intercollegiate sports for men and women, and the Olympic Games movement are examined in detail.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 216 - Special Topics in History

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to address specific topics of interest in history. Offerings are more specific and focused than the introductory surveys. Topics may change from semester to semester based on faculty and student interest.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    HIS 219 - Twentieth Century Europe

    3 Credits

    The course will survey social, cultural, economic, international, and political developments in the history of Europe in the twentieth century. Prominent topics will be the causes and effects of the two world wars, European imperialism and decolonization, the development of fascism and dictatorship, the two postwar economic booms and ensuing stagnations, the Cold War, the demise of the Soviet Union, and European unification. Three credits.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-WC - Western Civilization (SWCV)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 240 - American Urban History

    3 Credits

    This is a survey of the development of American cities from pre-colonial times to the present, focusing on the forces that have stimulated their growth and transformation. Among the forces given consideration include the influence of immigrants and migrants, commerce and entertainment, technological and industrial revolutions, population mobility and suburbanization, private and public responses to post industrial urban decay, race and ethnic issues as well as class and gender matters. Throughout, the story of the American urban life will be presented in the context of the broader patterns of the social, cultural, political and economic history of the nation.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HIS 275 - The Holocaust: History and Legacies

    3 Credits

    The Holocaust is explored as a transcendent narrative, a lens for exploring both genocide and human rights. Building upon knowledge primarily gained in the historical field of Western Civilization, historical analysis is used to examine both the historical and select cultural ramifications of the Holocaust and the expansion of human rights in the post-1945 era.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-WC - Western Civilization (SWCV)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HIS 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

    Learning Attributes: WR

HMN - Humanities

    HMN 101 - Humanities: Experiencing Culture

    3 Credits

    An interdisciplinary humanities course designed to introduce students to definitions and examples of culture in the Humanities. As a required part of the course, students will attend various cultural events (plays, musical performances, gallery exhibits, lectures and speeches, etc.) on campus and use the experiences as starting points to critically discuss and write about historical and contemporary ideas of culture and its products. The general knowledge areas include: The creative process, changing cultural values and social conditions, influences of scientific advancements, and global interdependence.

    Prerequisite(s): Waiver of accuplacer reading and sentence level tests; score of 71 or higher on reading test and 82 or higher on sentence level test; or completion of TRS 200 with a C or better; or completion of TRS 105 with a C or higher; or completion of ESL 201 with a C or higher, or ENG 200 placement.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    HMN 220 - Western Humanities I

    4 Credits

    An interdisciplinary search for moral, social, and political alternatives and meaning embodied in the institutions, culture, and literature of Western Civilization from the beginnings to 1600. This course is factual as well as conceptual, including a narrative history of the period covered.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-WC in addition to the other listed category below.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a grade of C or better or English 200 with a grade of C or better.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    HMN 221 - Western Humanities II

    4 Credits

    An interdisciplinary search for moral, social, and political alternatives and meaning embodied in the institutions, culture, and literature of Western Civilization from 1600 to the present. This course is factual as well as conceptual, including a narrative history of the period covered.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-WC in addition to the other listed category below.

    Prerequisite(s): English 101 with a grade of C or better, or English 200 with a grade of C or better.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    HMN 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

HON - Honors Studies

    HON 101 - Honors Studies: Orientation

    1 Credit

    This is the first in a series of four 1-credit courses that comprise the common experience in the MCC Honors Institute. Through a variety of in-class discussions and out-of-class experiences, students will be introduced to the six essential components of the MCC honors experience: scholarly inquiry, self-discovery, creative expression, service learning, global awareness, and abstract thought.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    HON 102 - Honors Studies: Exploration and Discovery

    1 Credit

    This is the second in a series of four 1-credit courses that comprise the common experience in the MCC Honors Institute. Students will build on the foundation of the first course as they are introduced to research methodologies in various academic disciplines. Students will also engage in a common service learning project.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    HON 195 - Honors Seminar in Critical Analysis

    3 Credits

    This course begins with presentation and exploration of core critical thinking concepts including but not limited to arguments, fallacies, rules of inference and evidence. Students will examine a selected topic/theme that will develop critical thinking, discussion leading and expository writing abilities.

    Prerequisite: Permission of Coordinator of Honors Studies.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HON 201 - Honors Studies: Scholarly Process

    1 Credit

    Students will develop a scholarly project, focusing and refining the topic as needed, and begin conducting their research. They will prepare the materials necessary to apply to deliver a presentation at a scholarly venue such as MCC's Scholars' Day.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    HON 202 - Honors Studies: Scholarly Presentation

    1 Credit

    Students will explore the factors necessary for high-quality scholarly presentations, giving and receiving appropriate feedback on student presentations. The course will culminate with either delivering an actual presentation at a scholarly venue, or having a presentation prepared and ready to deliver at such a venue.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    HON 295 - Research Methods and Academic Writing

    3 Credits

    This course focuses on analytical, argumentative and research writing, with an emphasis on research strategies and the finer points of advanced academic writing. Students will study and learn to utilize various analytical heuristics to improve their reading, critical thinking, and writing skills. Emphasis will be on the methods of process-based research writing, including library and note-taking strategies, using inquiry to guide research, peer-review workshops, and utilizing citation styles like MLA and APA. Each semester the research and writing will be focused on an overall course theme, such as “Justice and Prejudice” or “Science and Society,” and will require reading and analyzing important works related to this theme as part of the research and writing process. Assignments and readings all seek to prepare students for the course’s final project, a 10-15 page seminar essay, and the course is specifically designed to prepare students for submitting abstracts and presenting their original research at area and regional undergraduate conferences.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-IL - Information Literacy (MIL)

Honors Studies

    HONORS SECTIONS

    In addition to the Honors Seminars, a variety of sections of multi-section courses are offered each semester as Honors Sections. Although the course material will be basically the same in honors and non-honors sections of a particular course, students in the honors sections will have the opportunity to further develop their ideas and understanding by exploring the material in greater depth.

HSM - Homeland Security Administration

    HSM 101 - Introduction to Emergency Management

    3 Credits

    This course is intended to provide information that will enable persons just entering the profession or expanding their roles to have the ability to work with emergency management issues. The course provides an overview of the characteristics, functions, and resources of an integrated system and how various emergency management services work together in an integration of resources and capabilities. In addition, this course will provide and analysis of current actions and threats impacting emergency management. Emphasis will be placed on how this system is applied to all hazards for all government levels, across the four phases and all functions of emergency management.

    HSM 102 - Introduction to Homeland Security

    3 Credits

    This course is an introduction to the concept of homeland security. The course will define and explain homeland security. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security will be thoroughly analyzed and its mission will be investigated. This course will also address the threat of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive devices and the use of these weapons of mass destruction. The importance and basic elements of a planned response, methods used to prevent the importation of weapons of mass destruction into the U.S. and what is being and what can be done to prevent another large-scale terrorist incident in the United States will be covered.

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-IL - Information Literacy (MIL)

    HSM 103 - Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Terrorism and Homeland Security

    3 Credits

    Terrorism and defending against it are not modern concepts. In fact, terrorism has its roots in America back to the Revolutionary War. This course is about understanding terrorism, counter-terrorism, violence, and how they have impacted America. Students will learn about historical examples of terrorism beginning with the Revolutionary War and extending through the post 9/11 period. Course content will include coverage of various terrorist events at home and abroad, America’s governmental response, its impact to public and private sectors and individuals. Students will also learn about how past and current experiences with terrorism are defining future strategies.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HSM 107 - Social Media: Issues and Impacts

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the field of social media. This course will define and explain social media and its impact on personal, organizational and global security. The course will address issues related to the responsible and effective use of social media; and the exploitation of information for social, economic, political and criminal gain. Students will need to access and use social media apps as part of this course.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HSM 108 - Introduction to Intelligence Processes

    3 Credits

    This course will provide a study of the United States government's intelligence community as well as an overview of the intelligence processes. This study will include a historical look at intelligence and some of its milestones. Discussed will be key terms, concepts and perspectives. Students will be exposed to the relationship of intelligence with law enforcement and homeland security and how some intelligence processes may be applied to emergency management and pre-incident planning.

    MCC General Education: MCC-IL - Information Literacy (MIL)

    HSM 202 - Organizational and Facility Security

    3 Credits

    This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of physical security policies, procedures, techniques and equipment. Topics covered include perimeter protection, intrusion detection, access control, closed circuit television (CCTV), risk and vulnerability assessments, insurance requirements, business continuity planning and acts of violence. The focus of this course will be on traditional methods of physical security (e.g. hardware, risk assessments, and business continuity). This course will also examine developing security technology and its application to reduce internal and external threats to businesses and organizations.

HSP - Hospitality

    HSP 101 - Introduction to the Hospitality Industry

    3 Credits

    This course is a study of the fascinating worlds of lodging, food and beverage service, meeting planning, travel and tourism, and the related businesses that make up the hospitality industry. Provides an overview of the components of this vast industry and their interlocking network.

    HSP 102 - Hospitality Service

    4 Credits

    Students will utilize service skills by interacting with customers and team members in an actual hospitality environment. In addition to this hands-on component, students will examine customer related skills in a classroom environment through the use of lecture, role play, and small group conferences. ,

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HSP 201 - Hospitality Human Resources Management

    3 Credits

    This course examines the theoretical and hands-on applications of management and supervisory practices in the hospitality industry. Communication strategies, recruitment, performance standards, evaluation techniques, diversity issues, and staff training are a few of the topics that will be discussed.

    HSP 202 - Introduction to Conference and Event Planning

    3 Credits

    This course is a comprehensive overview of the process of planning meetings, conferences and special events. Step-by-step organization, preliminary planning, site selection and timing strategies are among the topics to be discussed. Students will discover where conference and event planning fits into the overall scope of the hospitality industry.

    HSP 204 - Advanced Conference and Event Planning

    3 Credits

    This course will focus on the competencies necessary to build and maintain a sustainable career in the event management field. Topics discussed will include, strategic planning, budgeting, HR management, marketing, and assessment. Class participants will create and execute a special event including the budget and marketing plan.

    Prerequisite(s): HSP 202

    HSP 211 - Hospitality Law

    3 Credits

    A study of the laws impacting the hospitality industry. Topics include An Introduction to Law, Court Systems, Civil Rights Law, Employment Law, Contracts, Torts, Regulations Governing the Sale of Food and Alcohol, Responsibility for Guests' Property, Legal Rights of Innkeepers and Restaurateurs, and Casino Law.

    HSP 222 - Integrated Studies for Hospitality Management

    1-3 Credits

    A specialized focus on the alliance of the food, hotel, and tourism management areas. This course emphasizes the interrelationship of these three areas in the field of catering, resort management, and destination appeal. Practical observation is provided either through domestic or international experiences via air, rail, ship, or motorcoach transportation. Hotel inspections and destination sightseeing, as well as restaurant tours, are an integral part of the course. Since the location, duration of the course, and course assignments will vary each semester, the credit hours also vary from one to three credits. Specific course requirements for each course can be obtained from the Department. Special fees include the cost of transportation to the course site, lodging, food, and miscellaneous expenses.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HSP 225 - Italy-Hospitality, Culture, and Society on Location

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to see and experience the richness of Italy through the unique experiences of travel and immersion into local society. The core components of this course will be a stay in country, with visits to the main cities and cultural centers providing experience through immersion. Class meetings prior to the trip will focus on topics that will help the students prepare for the experience, and meetings after the trip will provide a time for debriefing, reporting, evaluation, and assimilation. The student is expected to complete ten tasks during his/her stay, make an oral presentation, and prepare a portfolio of the trip. This portfolio can be a personal journal, photo display, video recording, or a combination thereof. On location hours are variable depending on the field experience offered.

    Prerequisite(s): Overall GPA of 2.5 or better or by permission of instructor.

    HSP 251 - Hospitality Marketing

    3 Credits

    Students will learn the theoretical concepts of developing a start-up business and give a shark tank pitch that shares the 8 Ps of the product or service. Students will apply core competencies gained throughout the semester, such as PRICE (planning, research, implementation, control & evaluation) to their start-up.

    The shark tank experience will simulate the personal selling skills needed in the hospitality industry, while demonstrating the marketing strategies necessary to ensure success. Core competencies are achieved in basic accounting, inventory management, human resources, sales and marketing.

    Additional skill sets are acquired through the intensive use of computer competencies such as Internet literacy, uploading, e-mailing, downloading and instant messaging. Students will draw from previous course content to enable successful completion of this course.

    Prerequisite: Must be HM Major; MCC Math Placement Level 2 or higher or TRS 092 with a grade of C or higher

    HSP 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

HTL - Hotel Technology

    HTL 105 - Hotel Operations

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive, fundamental understanding of how hotels are managed with respect to the rooms perspective (reservations, front desk, housekeeping, engineering, and security). Through computer simulation, property tours, and guest lecturers, students will be exposed to the operational positions and responsibilities of the different areas of the rooms division. Food and beverage, sales and marketing, and the accounting office will be addressed with respect to how each of these departments interact with the rooms division.

    HTL 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

HUM - Human Services

    HUM 100 - Entry Level Skills for the Human Services Student

    3 Credits

    This is a prerequisite course for students presently enrolled in TRS 105 who would like to enroll in HUM 101 Introduction to Human Services. It will include an overview of the field, career choices within Human Services, an understanding of the field work experience, self assessment, and a development of personal learning goals and plans.

    HUM 101 - Introduction to Human Services

    4 Credits

    Introduction to generic issues in human services. Role definition, boundaries, and ethics of professional relationships. Examination of self-awareness in the helping relationship and development of beginning group skills. Development and practice of observing, listening, recording and interviewing skills. Discussion and analysis of field work experiences. Students must be qualified ( based on Accuplacer) to take ENG 101 in order to register for this course. In conjunction with this course, the student must take and pass HUM 111 Field Work in Human Services I.

    Prerequisite: Placement exam at ENG 101 level. Corequisite: HUM 111.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HUM 102 - Basic Helping Skills

    4 Credits

    Development of basic helping skills, including sensitivity, empathy, attending, questioning, confrontation, and problem solving. Examination and evaluation of client assessment, goal setting, case planning, case management. Further practice in group process and continuation of skill development in observing, listening, interviewing, recording and reporting. Discussions and analysis of field work experience. Students must be qualified ( based on Accuplacer) to take ENG 101 in order to register for this course. In conjunction with this course, the student must take and pass HUM 112 Field Work in Human Services II.

    Prerequisite: HUM 101 with a grade of C- or better.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HUM 106 - Human Services Focus

    4 Credits

    Designed to allow maximum, flexible response to specific needs of groups and agencies with particular human service problems. Details of specific offerings will be available at registration time each semester offered. Students must be qualified ( based on Accuplacer) to take ENG 101 in order to register for this course. In conjunction with this course, the student must take and pass HUM 116 Field Work in Human Services Focus.

    Prerequisite: HUM 101 with a grade of C- or better

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HUM 111 - Field Work in Human Services I

    2 Credits

    On the basis of his or her particular interests, each student chooses the kind of community agency in which he/she would like to train. Under the guidance of experienced agency supervisors, the student begins the reality testing process in the paraprofessional role. Carefully graded opportunities to take responsibility for agency clients. In conjunction with this course, the student must take and pass HUM 101 Introduction to Human Services. Open only to students in HUM 101.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    HUM 112 - Field Work in Human Services II

    2 Credits

    Student chooses this field work placement in accordance with his or her emerging career goals. Opportunities for taking increasing amounts of responsibility for agency clients. Planning with experienced agency supervisor to develop specific skills needed to function effectively as a member of the agency's helping service team. In conjunction with this course, the student must take and pass HUM 102 Basic Helping Skills. Open only to students in HUM 102.

    Prerequisite: HUM 111 with a grade of C- or better.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HUM 116 - Field Work in Human Services Focus

    2 Credits

    A Human Services field work course designed to meet the needs of students in Human Services focus courses. This course provides practical experience in the service field for each Human Services focus course. In conjunction with this course, the student must take and pass HUM 106 Human Services Focus. Open only to students in HUM 106.

    Prerequisite: HUM 111 with a grade of C- or better; co-requisite: HUM 106

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    HUM 130 - Introduction to the Disability Support Services Field

    3 Credits

    This course will provide students with an orientation to direct services in the field of disability. It will give a broad overview of the essential topics in providing direct services and address common expectations and issues direct service providers encounter in this field.

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HUM 135 - Roles and Responsibilities in Disability Support Services

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to explore careers in the disability field and also examine service systems that provide support to people with disabilities. The course will emphasize experiential opportunities to meet and observe individuals from a variety of professions in the field, which will foster a deeper understanding of roles and responsibilities in the disability field.

    HUM 201 - Models of Helping

    4 Credits

    Examination of the models, theories and roles that guide the practice of Human Services. The organizational structure of human services agencies will be examined and the systemic issues that impact clients and agencies will be analyzed. Career and transfer opportunities will be explored. Advanced group process, and field work experience will be discussed and analyzed. Students must be qualified ( based on Accuplacer) to take ENG 101 in order to register for this course. In conjunction with this course, the student must take and pass HUM 211 Field Work in Human Services III.

    Prerequisite: HUM 102, 112 with a grade of C- or better.

    HUM 207 - Skills for Working with Family Violence Issues

    3 Credits

    This course will provide an introduction to legal, medical, and social perspectives on family violence issues. It will examine the definitions/types, controversies, and nature/scope of family violence. It will also examine the factors which contribute to and consequences of family violence from the legal, medical, and social perspectives. Students will develop, discuss, analyze, and practice working with issues of family violence in class.

    HUM 210 - Disability Across the Lifespan Strategies for the Human Services Worker

    3 Credits

    The course provides a basic understanding in the identification, prevalence and characteristics of individuals with disabilities across the life span. Additionally, the course will review legal mandates and historical movements that have shaped and defined the disability community today. Students will explore resources that will assist them in working with individuals with disabilities across the lifespan.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HUM 211 - Field Work in Human Services III

    2 Credits

    Students select field placement to enhance attainment of individual career goals. Under experienced agency supervisors, students carry increased responsibility for clients and for agency program planning. Further development of the specific helping skills needed for effective functioning in the chosen agency. In conjunction with this course, the student must take and pass HUM 201 Models of Helping. Open only to students in HUM 201.

    Prerequisite: HUM 112 with a grade of C- or better.

    HUM 220 - Working with Clients Post-Incarceration

    3 Credits

    This course addresses issues that may be encountered by those whose work brings them into contact with individuals who are returning, or have recently returned, to society from incarceration. It includes understanding of the stigma attached to their legal status, the barriers that they may encounter, and the sometimes misguided mind-set with which some formerly incarcerated individuals anticipate their return to families and society as a whole. Additionally, the course includes topics such as interaction with legal supervision, case management, housing, and employment for the formerly incarcerated.

    HUM 230 - Individualized Planning and Documentation for Disability Support Services

    3 Credits

    This course will provide an overview of documentation and compliance requirements across service systems, including early intervention services, school-age services, vocational rehabilitation services, mental health services,and day services. In addition, the course will incorporate approaches within a person centered planning framework for developing and implementing individualized supports for individuals with disabilities.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    HUM 235 - Supporting and Communicating with People with Significant Disabilities

    3 Credits

    This course is an exploration of the ways in which people with significant disabilities are supported in their communities. The course will emphasize concepts of positive behavioral support and communication strategies to facilitate self-determination and independent decision-making in a person’s daily life. Students will learn about key concepts and the philosophy models of services systems that support people with significant disabilities.

    MCC General Education: MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    HUM 236 - Contemporary Issues in the Field of Disability Support Services

    3 Credits

    This course will provide an in-depth exploration of contemporary issues in the field of direct disability support services, starting with the historical roots and current events in the disability rights movement, moving into specific contemporary issues, and ending with the most current controversial topics in the field.

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    HUM 250 - Introduction to Aging for the Human Services Worker

    3 Credits

    Students will examine contemporary issues impacting older adults such as special needs, changing roles experienced with aging, community resources, legislation and programs designed to meet these multifaceted needs. Students will develop methods for planning and implementing diverse activities and other approaches to encourage maintenance of health and self-sufficiency of the mature adult.

    HUM 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

HVA - Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning

    HVA 101 - Basic Refrigeration Theory

    3 Credits

    Covers the physical principles of refrigeration and the refrigeration cycle. Students will be introduced to the components of the refrigeration system including compressors, condensers, expansion devices, evaporators, coolers, freezers, and refrigerants.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    HVA 102 - Air Conditioning Theory

    3 Credits

    Covers the physical principles of air conditioning, psychometrics and air movement. Components found in today's air conditioning systems will be examined. Students will learn how to charge and evacuate systems. Other topics included are: pressure, regulating and bypass controls, diffusers, piping procedures, traps and high velocity systems.

    Prerequisite: HVA 101.

    HVA 103 - Heating Systems

    3 Credits

    Servicing modern heating systems, whether they are gas, electric or oil, requires a thorough understanding of basic heating concepts. This course provides the student with the technical knowledge as well as the laboratory skills to begin their career in heating service.

    HVA 104 - Commercial Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps

    3 Credits

    Deals with the basic principles of air conditioning as they are applied to large commercial systems. The principles of heat pumps will be included. Topics covered include: gas and electric heating/cooling of top units, economizers and large air distribution systems.

    Prerequisite(s): HVA 101 and HVA 102.

    HVA 105 - Electric and Motor Controls

    3 Credits

    Covers basic principles of electricity and electric motor theory as it is found in the heating, ventilating, air conditioning industry. Topics covered are: series and parallel circuits, Ohm's law, amperage, voltage, watts, transformers, relays, contactors, wire sizing, distribution, and capacitors.

    HVA 106 - HVAC Workplace Training

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to prepare the HVAC technician for the legal and safety issues related to the industry. Employee, employer, and customer relations will be explored. The student will learn to self-evaluate their personal and technical skills and prepare a professional plan for growth.

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    HVA 201 - Electronic Controls and Troubleshooting

    3 Credits

    A review of AC and DC theory and wiring diagrams. Use of multimeters, watt/hour meters, amprobes, oscilloscopes and power sources. Students will devote considerable time to learning how to troubleshoot electrical problems through the use of load simulators such as the Ranco system and printed circuit boards.

    Prerequisite(s): HVA 105

    HVA 202 - Boiler Systems

    3 Credits

    Covers the principles and theory of hot water and steam boilers. Topics covered are: design, controls, pumps and valves of boilers, New York State boiler codes, and the servicing of hot water and steam boiler systems.

    Prerequisites: HVA 103

    HVA 203 - Commercial Load Calculation

    3 Credits

    Covers all the elements related to calculating loads in commercial applications. Topics covered will include: reading building blueprints, evaluating building conditions, heating and cooling load calculation, equipment selection, duct distribution systems, and use of fire dampers, access doors, detectors, diffusers, control systems.

    Prerequisite(s): HVA 101, HVA 102 and MTH 135 or higher.

    HVA 204 - Energy Management

    3 Credits

    Covers the design and service of the appropriate energy management system for a given facility. Topics to be covered are: evaluation of mechanical systems, building structure, needs of occupant, duty cycling, microprocessor controls, preventative maintenance and cost analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): HVA 105 or permission of department.

    HVA 205 - New Products

    3 Credits

    An overview of all types of equipment currently on the market and in use in heating, ventilating, and air conditioning installations, both incidental and commercial. It is designed to keep the student up to date with information on state-of-the-art developments in the field.

    HVA 206 - Advanced Heating Systems

    3 Credits

    An advanced level course in heating systems focusing on fossil fuel technology and venting. There will also be discussions in calculating fuel economies and greenhouse effects.

    Prerequisite(s): HVA 103

    HVA 207 - Computers in HVAC

    3 Credits

    A course demonstrating the role of the computer in the HVAC technologies. The student will receive an overview of the operation of six current computer programs in the HVAC specialties.

    Prerequisites: HVA 102, HVA 103 and HVA 104.

    HVA 209 - Refrigerant Technology

    1 Credit

    A thorough understanding of the various refrigerant types are necessary for the heating, ventilating and air conditioning service technician. This short course will explore CFC's, HFC's, HCFC's and the refrigerant retrofit procedures necessary in today's changing energy field.

    Prerequisites: HVA 101, HVA 102, HVA 104 or permission of department.

    HVA 210 - Mechanical Estimating

    4 Credits

    As many heating, ventilating and air conditioning personnel advance in their careers, the aspiration for many is to enter the area of estimating. This course will explore the fundamentals of blueprint reading, mechanical takeoff, reading mechanical specifications, equipment and labor estimating, both manually and by computer. This course is applicable to both residential and commercial contractors.

    Prerequisites: HVA 101, HVA 102, HVA 103, HVA 104, HVA 105 or permission of department.

    HVA 211 - Commercial Refrigeration

    3 Credits

    Commercial refrigeration service is a specialization within the heating, ventilating and air conditioning industry. This course will provide the student with the understanding of ice machines, reach-in coolers and freezers, as well as walk-in coolers and freezers. Emphasis will be placed on repair of restaurant type equipment.

    Prerequisite(s): HVA 101 and HVA 102

    HVA 212 - Industrial Mechanical Systems

    3 Credits

    In response to continued emphasis on energy conservation, the heating, ventilating and air conditioning industry has seen a resurgence in applications utilizing chillers, variable air volume and heat recovery systems. This course will provide the student with an understanding of these complex systems.

    Prerequisite(s): HVA 101 and HVA 103, and HVA 105 or permission of department.

    HVA 220 - Sheet Metal Fabrication

    3 Credits

    This course will provide students with the theory and application of sheet metal fabrication for use in the field of residential and light commercial HVAC installation. Students will gain a working knowledge of floor and hand tools used in the trade and relevant safety issues. Geometry and math associated with fabrication are an integral part of this course.

    HVA 271 - Cooperative Education-Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning

    4 Credits

    Students in the Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning certificate and degree programs may participate in a cooperative educational experience as a program elective. Students enrolled in this co-op must be able to work and document a minimum of 180 hours per semester. Both paid and unpaid work experience is acceptable. The Department Chair and the Co-op Director must approve the HVAC/R employer. In addition to the field work, students must attend a two hour per week classroom seminar. The Co-op Office, located in Rm. 3-108, will assist students in obtaining jobs. Present jobs may qualify. Students must have at least a 2.0 GPA to qualify for this opportunity. Part time students will be required to purchase student insurance while enrolled in this course.

    Prerequisite: HVA 101

    HVA 275 - Modern Welding Techniques

    3 Credits

    This course is an introduction to MIG and TIG welding and plasma cutting. These skills are practical and often essential for various craftspersons. Students will work with aluminum, stainless steel, and other common metals in this course. This course is offered off-site at Mahaney Welding. In addition to tuition, part-time students must purchase student insurance. Students should also expect to purchase a pre-packaged kit of course materials including their safety equipment and book.

    HVA 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

IDE - Interior Design

    IDE 101 - Introduction to Interior Design I

    3 Credits

    This course addresses theoretical approaches to design by considering design precedents, theory, and process. Course material will review the development of the built environment with an emphasis on interior style. The elements and principles of design will be explored with consideration of their application to the interior environment. The design process, including programming and space planning, will be discussed as a basis for successfully approaching design problems.

    IDE 102 - Introduction to Interior Design II

    3 Credits

    As a continuation of IDE101, this course explores the physical properties of the built environment. Through discussion of building codes, construction technologies, mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems a basic understanding of the built environment will be addressed. Consideration will be given to interior building components, materials, and furnishings.

    Prerequisite: IDE 101 with a grade of C or better

    IDE 131 - Building Information Modeling

    3 Credits

    This course introduces the student to methods used to graphically communicate design choices. Architectural drawings will be developed from sketch to computer-generated images. Attention for most of the course will focus on the incorporation of building information modeling software into the design and communication process.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    IDE 132 - Digital Visualization Techniques

    3 Credits

    This course introduces the student to a variety of software applications that may be used to explore design solutions and to communicate those solutions to the client. Through a series of projects students will develop virtual models of space, forms, and the application of lighting in the virtual environment.

    Prerequisite: IDE 131.

    IDE 201 - Residential Planning and Design

    3 Credits

    Provides practical application of interior design concepts to the residential design project. Students will work on a variety of residential problems with emphasis on client contact and interviewing, program development, and design development. Communication of design concepts via a variety of media and presentations will be required.

    Prerequisite(s):IDE 102 with a grade of C or better and IDE 132 with a grade of C or better.

    IDE 203 - Contract Design and Planning

    3 Credits

    Provides practical application of interior design concepts to the nonresidential design project with an emphasis on issues of accessibility and ergonomics. Students will work in teams on both hospitality and office design projects.

    Prerequisite(s): IDE 102 with a grade of C or better and IDE 132 with a grade of C or better.

    IDE 250 - Color and Light

    3 Credits

    This course explores the relationship of color and light, focusing on the development of interior lighting systems. Specific attention will be given to emerging lighting technologies and their application in the interior.

    Prerequisite(s): IDE 102 with a grade of C or better; IDE 132 with a grade of C or better.

    IDE 270 - Interior Design Seminar

    3 Credits

    This course covers the use of digital drawing, photo-editing, and website design as means of developing self promotion through the creation of resume and portfolio materials. Discussion will address transfer options as well as the many possible career paths that may be pursued in the field.

    Prerequisite(s): IDE 102 with a grade of C or better; IDE 132 with a grade of C or better.

ITA - Italian/Foreign Language

    ITA 101 - Elementary Italian I

    3 Credits

    Designed for students with no previous experience in the language. Focuses on communicative skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes high frequency vocabulary, basic constructions, common phrases, and cultural aspects. Also stresses student participation in skills development. ITA I0I is strongly recommended for oral fluency especially for students transferring to four-year institutions.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    ITA 102 - Elementary Italian II

    3 Credits

    Continuation of ITA 101 with emphasis on basic language skills for communication and on cultural aspects to promote understanding and appreciation of Italian culture. ITA 112 is strongly recommended as a companion course to develop oral fluency, especially for students transferring to four-year institutions.

    Prerequisite: ITA 101 or one year of high school Italian or equivalent.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    ITA 111 - Elementary Italian Conversation I

    2 Credits

    Intensive participation in the spoken language to develop and improve oral fluency in conversation. Strongly recommended as a companion course to ITA 101 especially for students transferring to four-year institutions.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    ITA 112 - Elementary Italian Conversation II

    2 Credits

    Intensive participation in the spoken language to develop and improve oral fluency in conversation, especially for students transferring to four-year institutions.

    Prerequisite: ITA 102 taken concurrently, or one year high school language, or ITA 101.

    MCC General Education: MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    ITA 203 - Intermediate Italian I

    3 Credits

    Communication skills in Italian for students with foundational experience in the language. Cultural topics are included in the development of practical language skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.

    Prerequisite(s): ITA 102, or successful completion of high school Italian 4, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

    ITA 221 - Italian Culture on Location

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide the opportunity to see and experience the richness of Italy through the unique experience of travel. The core part of this course will be a stay in the country, with visits to the main cities and cultural centers. Class meetings prior to the trip will focus on topics that will help the student to prepare for the experience, and meetings after the trip will provide a time for debriefing, reporting, evaluation, and assimilation. The student is expected to complete ten tasks during his/her stay, make an oral presentation, and prepare a portfolio of the trip. This portfolio can be a personal journal, photo display, video recording, or a combination thereof. On location hours variable depending on the field experience offered.

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

JPN - Japanese/Foreign Language

    JPN 101 - Elementary Japanese I

    3 Credits

    Designed for students with little or no previous experience in contemporary Japanese. Emphasizes oral communication and listening comprehension skills. Also focuses in developing mastery of the Japanese writing system for basic reading and writing of simple sentences and short paragraphs. Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji characters are taught so that students will be able to communicate both orally and in written form in the most essential everyday life situations. Students will also learn Japanese customs, traditions and culture.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    JPN 102 - Elementary Japanese II

    3 Credits

    Students will continue strengthening their communicative skills (pronunciation, syllable stress) and writing skills using the Japanese writing system (Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji characters) that are necessary for reading and writing simple sentences and short paragraphs. Grammatical structures will be taught so that students will be able to communicate correctly, both orally and in written form in the most essential everyday life situations. Students will also learn Japanese customs, traditions, and culture associated with major life events, holidays and social interactions.

    Prerequisite(s): JPN 101, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Memory and length of time since last studied are factors in successful placement.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO)

    JPN 203 - Intermediate Japanese I

    3 Credits

    Continued study in Japanese for those with a firm foundation in elementary Japanese communication, written and oral. Grammar and vocabulary are continued at a higher level so that the student develops strong reading and writing skills in order to create complex sentences and short paragraphs. In this class, the student will attain oral and listening skills to successfully function in a variety of daily situations. Cultural topics are included in the study of grammar and structure. Memory and length of time since last studied are factors in successful placement.

    Prerequisite(s): JPN 102, or successful completion of equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-FL - Foreign Language (SFRL)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCO - Speaking (MBCO), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

LAW - Law

    LAW 101 - Fundamentals of the Law

    3 Credits

    A study of how civil and criminal law governs society. Purchases, leases, contracts, divorces, environmental issues, and criminal offenses will be explored. Emphasis will be on development of those skills necessary to recognize and better deal with common legal problems to be confronted throughout adult life.

    LAW 110 - Great Trials

    3 Credits

    An in-depth and comprehensive examination of one or two significant local "landmark" cases, from investigation through appeal. Course is designed to allow the distillation of legal principles by working with actual trial records, appellate briefs, and newspaper reports. When practical, actual participants in the trial and appeal (judge, lawyers, newspaper reporters, and others) will be asked to share their unique perspectives with the class. Students will be required to complete an interpretative essay on issues in the case.

    LAW 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

LDS - Leadership

    LDS 101 - A Seminar in Leadership Development

    3 Credits

    A study to develop a basic understanding of leadership with special emphasis upon: styles and approaches toward leadership, motivational factors, communication skills, decision-making processes, characteristics of groups and group techniques, and the methodology and significance of goal-setting.

    LDS 102 - Leadership and Diversity

    3 Credits

    This course will examine how diversity affects groups, organizations, coalitions, and societies, and will pay particular attention to the challenges and opportunities diversity presents for leadership. The course approaches diversity in a new way, treating diversity as a feature of individuals as well as groups of individuals.

    Prerequisite: LDS 101

    LDS 103 - Organizational Leadership

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the concepts, theories and ideas guiding leadership activities at work. This course will introduce a wide array of theories on topics relevant to understanding and controlling employee and managerial behavior, and provide insight and hands-on experience on how to use this knowledge to address leadership problems that you will face in organizations.

    Prerequisite/Corequisite: LDS 101 OR LDS 102

    LDS 202 - Leadership and Decision Making

    3 Credits

    This course provides a foundation in organizational dynamics and decision making. It emphasizes the main theories, models and approaches related to topics such as group processes and dynamics, rational and non-rational models of problem solving; group composition, cooperation in conflict; the organizational dynamics of diversity; formal and informal models of leadership; organizational culture; and organizational learning and development.

    Prerequisite/Corequisite: LDS 101, LDS 102

    LDS 204 - Leadership in the Local and Global Community

    3 Credits

    This course is intended to develop a greater awareness of and sensitivity to the importance of ethical components of managerial decision making. It is designed to provide students with conceptual tools and frameworks useful for analyzing business decisions, practices and policies in terms of their legal, ethical and public policy dimensions. This course will also prepare future leaders to meet their social obligations, function within organizational realities, and manage the complex interrelationships with other groups and institutions.

    Prerequisites: LDS 101 and LDS 102

    LDS 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

MAR - Marketing

    MAR 200 - Principles of Marketing

    3 Credits

    This course examines the business function of Marketing. Students will learn how marketers deliver value in satisfying customer needs and wants, determine which target markets the organization can best serve, and decide upon appropriate products, services, and programs to serve these markets. Topics include branding and product development, pricing strategies, marketing research, promotion, supply chain management and service marketing. Marketing metrics will be used throughout the course to assess the impact of marketing strategies.

    Prerequisites: BUS 104 with a C or better and (MTH098 with a C or better or MTH096 with a B- or better or MCC Level 6 Mathematics placement.)

    MAR 201 - Dynamics of Selling

    3 Credits

    Factors involved in effective selling; methods of conducting the sales presentation; application of psychological and persuasive selling techniques.

    Prerequisite: BUS 104 with a C or better

    MAR 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

MET - Mechanical Technology

    MET 101 - Technical Graphics

    3 Credits

    A course which combines the basic skills needed to communicate ideas in a graphical format with the understanding and use of a 2D and 3D CAD program (AutoCAD). The student will be able to generate 3 view drawings and pictorial sketches. The student will also be able to interpret and understand fully dimensioned drawings and create their own drawings using AutoCAD software. Understanding of the basic principles of 2D and 3D CAD will be reinforced to allow the student to quickly learn additional software packages in the future.

    Prerequisite: Some experience with mechanical drawing is desirable, since most students in this course have had one or more terms of drawing.

    MET 103 - Manufacturing Processes I

    2 Credits

    Operation of lathes, milling machines, drill presses, grinders, measurement and measuring instruments, utilization and capabilities of these devices in manufacturing processes.

    MET 107 - Mechanical Systems

    3 Credits

    This course is a study of basic mechanical components. The course will span the basic functions and physical properties of mechanical components and the roles they play in the system. Students will gain knowledge and experience with materials, lubrication requirements and surface properties. Additionally, troubleshooting techniques will be introduced for identifying and resolving mechanical faults. Preventative maintenance methods and mechanical component safety will be emphasized. Technical documentation such as data sheets and specifications of mechanical elements will also be covered.

    MET 110 - Hydraulics and Pneumatics

    3 Credits

    This course is a study of fluid power technology using fluids or compressed air as the transfer media. Complete hydraulic and pneumatic systems are studied including power sources, reservoirs, pumps, compressors, lines, valves and actuators. Students will learn troubleshooting strategies to identify, localize and correct malfunctions. Preventative maintenance and safety issues will also be discussed.

    MET 121 - Computer Aided Drafting/Design - Solid Modeling

    3 Credits

    An introductory course in Solid Modeling using SolidWorks software. Through a combination of lecture and hands-on laboratory experiences, the student will learn the basics of solid modeling design. Projects will focus on the importance of design intent and geometric relations to maximize the efficiency of the design process.

    Prerequisite: MET 101 (may be taken concurrently or previously completed).

    MET 122 - Advanced Solid Modeling using SolidWorks

    3 Credits

    An advanced course in solid modeling techniques for both part and assembly design using SolidWorks software. The student will learn to design using multiple solid bodies and surfacing through lecture and hands on experience. Other topics covered include Animations, Sweeps, Lofts, Molding and Weldments. The student will also have an opportunity to create a prototype using a 3D printer.

    Prerequisite: MET 121 or ENR 153 or permission from Department.

    MET 201 - Designing for Materials, Manufacturing and Assembly

    3 Credits

    The student will be become competent in material selection and design optimization techniques necessary for today’s modern manufacturing and assembly processes.

    Students will rate their own designs against manual and high speed robotic assembly techniques using state-of-the-art software tools.

    Student prototypes are created using design geometry and selected materials matched to the appropriate manufacturing processes such as Injection Molding, CNC Machining, Casting and Forging.

    Prerequisites: MET 101 or MET 121 or ENR 153

    MET 202 - Functional Design, Drafting, and Analysis

    3 Credits

    The student learns to apply Computer Aided Design tools to analyze the functional parameters of parts and assemblies. Student teams are required to design and analyze assemblies in a hands-on project based learning environment. Course modules include kinematic and motion analysis, tolerance analysis and functional loading analysis of parts and assemblies.

    Prerequisite: MET 101, ENR 153

    MET 203 - Technical Mechanics, Statics

    3 Credits

    This course engages the student in the study of the Vector Mechanics of Mechanical Systems in Static Equilibrium. The student will study Force Systems, Constraint Mechanisms, Basic Beam Theory and Structures including: Trusses, Frames and Machines. The course prepares the student in the basic development of equations and systems of equations necessary for the solution to engineering problems needed for future study.

    Pre-requisites: MTH 140 with a grade of C or better OR MTH 165 with a grade of C or better; Co-requisite: PHY 131 or higher (or previously completed)

    MET 206 - Engineering Materials

    3 Credits

    This course introduces the student to the nature of materials used in the design and manufacture of products and machinery. Ferrous, non-ferrous, polymers, ceramics, composites, and naturally occurring materials are all covered in this course. The emphasis is on material selection, production, and formation into final product. A companion lab gives the student the ability to get hands-on experience in understanding the structure, testing, and selection of materials.

    MET 208 - Technical Mechanics, Dynamics

    3 Credits

    Students will study classical vector mechanics dealing with the laws of motion. The course covers kinematics, the study of motion without reference to cause, and kinetics, the study of motion as a result of applied forces and moments.

    Prerequisite: MET 203 with a grade of C or better.

    MET 225 - Machine Design Theory I

    3 Credits

    This is a course which studies the practical use of advanced strength of materials principles, allowing the student to interpret the failure mechanisms necessary for optimized machine element design. Computer based tools are used to create analytical tools.

    Prerequisite: MET 203 with a grade of C or better.

    MET 226 - Machine Design Theory II

    3 Credits

    This is the second of a two-course sequence in Machine Design Theory. It is an advanced course in which mathematical analysis, industry best practices, and system interpretation are used for the effective design of machine elements such as bearings, springs, gears, cams and mechanisms. Computer based tools are applied to create flexible design and analytical tools.

    Prerequisite: MET 225 with a grade of C or better.

    MET 250 - Mechatronics Systems

    3 Credits

    This course provides hands-on experience in the control, maintenance, and simulation of a mechatronics system in a team environment to promote learning a broad array of job-ready troubleshooting skills in integrated technologies. Topics will include system level programming/troubleshooting, applications and calibration of mechanical drives, electronic sensors, input/output devices.

    Prerequisites: MET 107, MET 110, ELT 130, and ELT 134, each with a grade of C or higher.

    MET 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

MTH - Mathematics

    MTH 096 - Algebra for Statistics

    3 Credits

    A basic algebra course designed to prepare students for MTH 160 (Statistics I) or MTH 162 (Statistics for the Social Sciences) at MCC. It is only for students who need MTH 160, MTH 161 or MTH 162 as the terminal mathematics course in their program and place at Mathematics Level 4, 5, or 6. It is not for students who need to take MTH 104 or MTH 165 (or higher). Topics include, but are not limited to, arithmetic operations on real numbers, solving linear equations and inequalities, simplifying expressions containing integer exponents, simplifying square roots and finding decimal approximations, graphing linear equations, an introduction to function notation, and appropriate applications of these topics.

    MCC level 4 mathematics placement or higher or TRS 094 with a grade of C or better.

    MTH 098 - Elementary Algebra*

    No Credit

    A first course in algebra with an emphasis on linear equations and their applications. Topics include, but are not limited to: solving linear equations and inequalities, performing arithmetic operations on polynomials, factoring polynomials, solving quadratic equations, simplifying expressions containing integer exponents, graphing linear equations and inequalities in one and two variables, solving systems of two linear equations, and appropriate applications of these topics.

    Prerequisite: TRS 094 with a grade of C or better, or MCC Level 4 Mathematics Placement. *MTH 098, MTH 099, and MTH 104 are developmental courses. They do not fulfill a mathematics requirement for an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science Degree.

    MTH 099 - Elementary Algebra Review (lab for Intermediate Algebra)

    No Credit

    An accelerated version of MTH 098, intended for students who need a review of basic algebra content. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, reviewing arithmetic operations on rational numbers, solving linear equations, graphing on the Cartesian Coordinate system and factoring polynomials. MTH 099 is typically taken with specially designated sections of MTH 104.

    Prerequisite(s): MCC level 5 mathematics placement, TRS 094 with a grade of A, MTH 096 with a grade of B-, MTH 098 with a grade of C-, or permission of instructor. *MTH 098, MTH 099, and MTH 104 are developmental courses. They do not fulfill a mathematics requirement for an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree.

    MTH 104 - Intermediate Algebra*

    4 Credits

    A second course in algebra with an emphasis on quadratic and rational equations and their applications, and a brief introduction to right triangle trigonometry. Topics include, but are not limited to: solving equations involving quadratic, rational and radical expressions; performing arithmetic operations on rational expressions, complex numbers and radical expressions; evaluating functions and determining domain and range; graphing quadratic functions; solving systems of non-linear equations; simplifying expressions involving rational exponents; solving right triangle trigonometric problems; and appropriate applications of each of these topics.

    Prerequisite: MTH 098 with a grade of C or better, or MTH 099 with a grade of C or better, or MCC Level 6 Mathematics Placement. *MTH 098, MTH 099, and MTH 104 are developmental courses. They do not fulfill a mathematics requirement for an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree.

    MTH 130 - Modern Business Mathematics

    3 Credits

    This course will cover the basic concepts and processes of mathematics applied to various business situations including statistical procedures, percentage and percent distributions of financial statement data, merchandising, payrolls, taxation and insurance. Other topics include simple interest, compound interest and annuities. MTH 130 is a course for career business.

    Prerequisite: TRS 092 with a grade of C or better, or MCC Level 2 Mathematics placement.

    MCC General Education: MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    MTH 135 - Introduction to Technical Mathematics*

    4 Credits

    An introductory course dealing with the development of algebraic and trigonometric concepts needed to solve problems in various technical areas. Topics include measurement and approximation, ratio and proportion, dimensional analysis, intermediate algebra, geometry, and right triangle trigonometry. NOTE: A specific calculator will be required of all students in this course.

    Prerequisite: MTH 098 with a grade of C or better, or MCC Level 6 Mathematics Placement. *MTH 135, MTH 140 and/or MTH 141 are required in various technology programs. They do not fulfill a mathematics requirement for an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree.

    MCC General Education: MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    MTH 140 - Technical Mathematics I*

    3 Credits

    A course dealing with the algebraic and trigonometric concepts needed to solve problems in various technical areas. It includes a study of linear and trigonometric equations, dimensional analysis, ratios and proportion, functions and their graphs, right triangle trigonometry, graphs of trigonometric functions, vectors, and statistical topics. NOTE: A specific calculator will be required of all students in this course.

    Prerequisite: MTH 135 with a grade of C or better or MTH 104 with a grade of C or better, or MCC Level 8 Mathematics placement. *MTH 135, MTH 140 and/or MTH 141 are required in various technology programs. They do not fulfill a mathematics requirement for an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-M - Mathematics (SMAT)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    MTH 141 - Technical Mathematics II*

    3 Credits

    An extension of the concepts developed in MTH 140. Topics included are complex numbers, higher degree equations, oblique triangle trigonometry, exponential equations, logarithms, systems of linear and quadratic equations, and inequalities. NOTE: A specific calculator will be required of all students in this course.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-M

    Prerequisite: MTH 140 with a grade of C or better or equivalent. *MTH 135, MTH 140 and/or MTH 141 are required in various technology programs. They do not fulfill a mathematics requirement for an Associate in Arts or Asscociate in Science degree.

    MTH 150 - Survey of Mathematics

    3 Credits

    A study of various topics including an introduction to estimation, algebra, geometry, consumer mathematics, probability and statistics, with an emphasis on critical thinking and interpreting results. Other topics may be covered at the discretion of the instructor.

    MTH 150 is a common selection by Liberal Arts students with fewer than three years of high school mathematics. MTH 150 is not a prerequisite course for MTH 160 or higher. Although this course can satisfy your mathematics requirement for some MCC programs and transfer to some baccalaureate institutions, if you are planning to transfer please speak with an academic advisor or Career and Transfer to ensure that this course meets your goals.

    Prerequisite: TRS 094 with a grade of C or better, or MCC Level 4 Mathematics placement.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-M - Mathematics (SMAT)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    MTH 155 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I

    3 Credits

    A course essential in developing the mathematical competency of the teacher or prospective teacher at the elementary level. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the mathematical curriculum recommended by the NCTM (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics) Standards, using a problem solving approach. Topics include historical development of numbers and number systems, study of whole numbers, integers, rationals, irrationals, and reals; abstract number systems; and elementary number theory.
    NOTE: MTH 155 is not a teaching methods course.

    Prerequisite: MTH 098 with a grade of C or better, MTH 099 with a grade of C or better, or MCC Level 6 Mathematics Placement.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    MTH 156 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II

    3 Credits

    A continuation of the concepts of MTH 155, which develop the mathematical competency of the teacher or prospective teacher at the elementary level. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the mathematical curriculum recommended by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards using a problem solving approach with appropriate technology. Topics include functions, probability, statistics, measurement, 2 and 3 dimensional geometry, transformational geometry, congruence and similarity. MTH 156 is a special interest course; check for availability.

    Prerequisite: MTH 155 with a grade of C or better.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-M - Mathematics (SMAT)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    MTH 160 - Statistics I

    3 Credits

    An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics intended to give an understanding of statistical techniques and applications in a wide variety of disciplines. Topics include measures of central tendency; dispersion and position; correlation and regression; probability and probability distributions, including binomial and normal; the Central Limit Theorem; parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. Minitab statistical software is used.

    MTH 096 (formerly MTH 080) with a grade of B- or better; or any of the following with a grade of C or better: MTH 104, MTH 140, MTH 141, MTH 165 (or higher); or MCC level 8 mathematics placement.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-M - Mathematics (SMAT)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    MTH 161 - Statistics II

    3 Credits

    Statistical inference with an introduction to experimental design. Topics include hypothesis testing and estimation for means, proportions and variances; sample size determination; uses of Chi-square distribution; analysis of variance; linear correlation and regression, non-parametric statistics and statistical research. Minitab statistical software is used.

    Prerequisite: MTH 160 with a grade of C or better.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-M - Mathematics (SMAT)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    MTH 162 - Statistics for the Social Sciences

    4 Credits

    An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics intended to give an understanding of statistical techniques and applications used in the social sciences. Topics include: measures of central tendency, dispersion and position; correlation and regression; probability and probability distributions, including binomial and normal; parameter estimation and hypothesis testing; two-sample analysis; chi-square test of independence; one-way analysis of variance. Statistical software will be used.

    This course is intended for, but not limited to Social Science majors. Students who have completed MTH 160 or MTH 161 may not receive additional credit for this course.

    Prerequisite(s): MTH 096 with a grade of B- or better, or MTH 104, MTH 140, MTH 141, MTH 165 (or higher) with a grade of C or better, or MCC Level 8 Mathematics placement

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-M - Mathematics (SMAT)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    MTH 164 - Introduction to Trigonometry

    1 Credit

    A first course in trigonometry. Topics include the trigonometric ratios, radian measure, angles in a coordinate system, ratio values for any angle, graphs of trigonometric functions and basic trigonometric identities and equations. A specific calculator will be required of all students in this course.

    Prerequisite: MTH 104 with a grade of C or better, or MCC Level 8 Mathematics Placement.

    MTH 165 - College Algebra

    3 Credits

    This course is intended to enhance algebraic skills and graphing techniques, and to prepare students for Precalculus Mathematics and Applied Calculus. Topics include functions that are quadratic, polynomial, piecewise, exponential and logarithmic; equations that are quadratic in form, involve radicals, absolute value, variation and rational exponents; inequalities that are quadratic, rational, and absolute value.

    Prerequisite: MTH 104 with a grade of C or better, or MTH 140 with a grade of C or better, or MCC Level 8 Mathematics placement.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-M - Mathematics (SMAT)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    MTH 172 - Technical Discrete Mathematics

    3 Credits

    An introduction to discrete mathematics primarily intended for students majoring in Information Technology or Computer Systems Technology. The emphasis will be on the development of technical discrete mathematics skills, rather than rigorous proof. Topics will include number systems, sets, logic, induction, elementary counting techniques, relations, functions, matrices, and Boolean algebra.

    Note: This course is not designed for students intending to major in Mathematics or Computer Science. Students intending to major in Mathematics or Computer Science should take MTH 220.

    Prerequisite: MTH 141 or MTH 165 with a grade of C or better, or MCC Level 9 Mathematics placement, or equivalent.

    MTH 175 - Precalculus

    4 Credits

    A study of the properties and graphs of functions, including polynomial, absolute value, power, piecewise, radical, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric. Topics also include a study of analytic trigonometry and an introduction to vectors. This course is intended to prepare students for the study of calculus.

    Prerequisite: MTH 165 with a grade of C or higher, or MTH 141 with a grade of C or higher, or MCC Level 9 Mathematics placement or higher.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-M - Mathematics (SMAT)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    MTH 200 - Applied Calculus

    4 Credits

    An intuitive introduction to the principal ideas of differential and integral calculus. Among the topics covered are: functions (including exponential and logarithmic), limits, differentiation, and integration. Emphasis will be placed upon the use of calculus in solving problems from areas including business, economics, and the social and natural sciences.

    Prerequisite: MTH 165 with grade of C or better, or MCC Level 9 Mathematics placement, or equivalent.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-M - Mathematics (SMAT)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    MTH 210 - Calculus I

    4 Credits

    A first course in single variable calculus. Topics include limits and continuity; differentiation of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse trigonometric functions; applications of derivatives to curve sketching, related rates, optimization, and rectilinear motion; indefinite and definite integrals; both parts of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; applications of definite integrals to area, average value, and rectilinear motion; and integration by u-substitution. A specific calculator may be required of students in this course. Students are advised to check with the instructor.

    Prerequisite: MTH 175 with grade of C or higher, or high school precalculus course taken within the last three years with a grade of B (83) or higher, or MCC Level 10 Mathematics placement.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-M - Mathematics (SMAT)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    MTH 211 - Calculus II

    4 Credits

    A second course in single variable calculus. Topics include techniques of integration, applications of definite integrals, first order separable differential equations, indeterminate limit forms, improper integrals, infinite series, Taylor polynomials, and power series. A specific calculator may be required of students in this course.

    Prerequisite: MTH 210 with a grade of C or higher.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-M - Mathematics (SMAT)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    MTH 212 - Calculus III

    4 Credits

    The calculus of functions of more than one variable, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, polar coordinates, solid analytic geometry and vectors, and the calculus of vector-valued functions are covered. A specific calculator will be required of all students in this course. Students are advised to check with the Mathematics Department.

    Prerequisite: MTH 211 with a grade of C or higher.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-M - Mathematics (SMAT)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    MTH 220 - Discrete Mathematics

    3 Credits

    An introduction to discrete mathematics primarily intended for students majoring in Mathematics or Computer Science. Topics will include propositional and predicate logic, elementary number theory, mathematical induction, set theory, combinatorics, functions, and relations. Methods of proof will be developed in a variety of mathematical contexts.

    Prerequisite: MTH 210 with a grade of C or higher, or equivalent.

    MTH 225 - Differential Equations

    4 Credits

    An introduction to ordinary differential equations and their applications. Analytical methods include: separation of variables, linear first order equations, substitution methods, second order linear equations with constant coefficients, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, autonomous systems of two first order equations, series solutions about ordinary points, and the Laplace Transform. In addition to analytical methods, quantitative and qualitative analysis will be employed through the use of Euler’s Method, phase lines, phase planes, and slope fields.

    Prerequisite: MTH 211 with a grade of C or better.

    MTH 230 - Linear Algebra

    4 Credits

    Topics include systems of linear equations, vectors and matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, and inner product spaces. Course also offered in Summer.

    Prerequisite: MTH 212 with a grade of C or better, or both MTH 211 and MTH 220 with a grade of C or better in each, or permission of instructor.

    MTH 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

MUS - Music

    MUS 101 - Music Appreciation

    3 Credits

    Interest, taste and discrimination in music and its relationship to other art forms; survey of style periods of Western Music; Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and Twentieth Century; survey of musical forms, instruments of the orchestra, and music in national cultures; biographical sketches of composers; listening to records essential.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 108 - College Chorus

    1 Credit

    Performance of a wide variety of choral music. Musical selections range from traditional to contemporary and include such diverse styles as madrigals, songs, chorales, folk music, jazz and rock. (May be repeated 4 times for a total of 4 credits).

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 109 - Music Theory I

    4 Credits

    Instruction in music theory, ear-training, and sight-singing based on the techniques of the Common Practice Period. Activities include: sight-singing of diatonic melodies, melodic, harmonic and rhythmic dictation, study of intervals, scales, triads, the dominant seventh chord and non-harmonic tones in analysis, and the connection of triads in four-voice writing. Computer software is incorporated to reinforce music theory concepts and for ear training practice.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 110 - Music Theory II

    4 Credits

    This course is a continuation of the ear training, sight singing and written materials of MUS 109 in greater depth and detail. Instruction is based on the techniques of the Common Practice Period. Principles of harmonic progression, diatonic common chord modulation, non-harmonic tones, the Classic Period, developmental techniques and small homophonic forms. Computer software is incorporated to reinforce music theory concepts, for ear training practice, and to typeset homework assignments.

    Prerequisite: MUS 109 or permission of the instructor.

    MUS 113 - Song Writing

    3 Credits

    The study of successful song forms and creative imitation of student's own experience into original parodies and songs.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-A

    MUS 114 - Contemporary A Cappella Ensemble

    1 Credit

    Performance of the genre of contemporary a cappella music. Musical selections will range from a variety of contemporary popular genres such as Rhythm and Blues, Rock, Alternative, Soul, Fusion, and Hip Hop. (May be repeated 4 times for a total of 4 credits.).

    Audition or permission of instructor required.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 118 - Broadway Musicals

    3 Credits

    A survey of musicals, revues and Broadway shows which represent the growth and development of American musical theatre as an art form. Students will learn to recognize and identify the characters, plot, best-known show tunes and other important facets of musical theatre.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 119 - Music in World Cultures

    3 Credits

    A diverse overview of classical, popular, and folk music traditions comprising all of the major world cultures. The objectives of the course are to look closely at how we define what music is and what social and cultural roles it serves in our lives. Students will listen to music from other cultures and discuss how the music reflects differences in the way that another society defines music and its role in their lives. This process will also show how diverse and global our own musical traditions already are. The course will also explore the role of music as ritual, mode of communication, work accompaniment and artistic expression.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-H and SUNY-A in addition to the other listed category below.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    MUS 120 - Jazz in American Society

    3 Credits

    A survey course in the evolution of jazz in America. Historical significances are identified and traced from rhythmic worksongs and spirituals of the late 1800s through avant-garde jazz of the 1970s. Specific concentration as to personalities and musical styles occurs for the major eras and trends in jazz; e.g., Ragtime, Dixieland, Swing, Bebop, Progressive, Modern, Third Stream, Rock, Jazz.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 121 - Voice Class

    3 Credits

    Group instruction in the mastery of vocal techniques, the study of common vocal problems, the development of basic musicianship and the cultivation of expressive singing ability. Students will perform songs covering a wide variety of moods, styles, and textual subjects.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 122 - Piano Class I

    3 Credits

    Group instruction in fundamental piano technique designed for the beginner. Pupils learn to read music, improvise chordal accompaniments, and develop technical proficiency through performance of elementary piano music.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 124 - Guitar Class I

    3 Credits

    An introductory course in the fundamentals of guitar playing, designed for the beginning student. A dual approach to the instrument will be taught: 1) as an accompaniment for singing; the student will learn chords, progressions, strums, and finger-picking; 2) as a solo instrument; the student will learn the fundamentals of reading music, as applied to the guitar; e.g. staff-notation, meters, rhythms, scales, positions with emphasis on developing dexterity. Students must provide their own guitars.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 126 - Applied Piano Minor I

    1 Credit

    A practical course in piano skills (scales, arpeggios, improvisation and accompanying) designed for students currently studying a major applied instrument or major vocal applied. Students should possess skills in music theory and be able to read music.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-A

    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    MUS 127 - Applied Piano Minor II

    1 Credit

    A continuation of MUS 126 for students currently studying voice or an instrument.

    Prerequisite: MUS 126 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

    MUS 129 - MIDI Recording Techniques

    3 Credits

    An introductory course in computer-assisted music production. Students will learn the fundamentals of the Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) as they pertain to MCC's own MIDI studio. Using a weighted piano keyboard controller connected via USB to an Apple computer running Digital Performer software, students will produce high quality music audio files.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-A

    Prerequisite: Basic keyboard proficiency or permission of instructor.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    MUS 131 - Studio Production

    3 Credits

    Designed to give the students practical experience in recording live music using digital multi-track recorders. The students will understand the use of microphones, mixers, multi-effects units and MIDI (Musical Instruments Digitally Interfaced) applications. Students will be given an overview of how past, present and future technological changes in the music industry impact recording techniques.

    Prerequisite: MUS 129 is strongly recommended.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    MUS 140 - Jazz Ensemble

    1 Credit

    Rehearsal and performance of jazz, Latin, and pop instrumental, music for big band (piano, bass, drums, saxophones, trumpets, trombones, and guitar). Rehearsals include study of playing with good time, intonation, jazz inflections, articulations, and correct interpretation of classic jazz literature to modern styles. Concert performances include major concerts twice each semester in MCC's Theatre, and there is the potential for additional on-campus or off-campus performances. (This course may be repeated 4 times for a total of 4 credits.)

    Prerequisite: Prior experience in a jazz band or permission of instructor. Recommended corequisites: MUS 143/144 is highly recommended .

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 141 - Madrigal Singers

    1 Credit

    A select group of singers rehearsing and performing vocal music from the Medieval and Renaissance time periods. Emphasis will be on developing musicianship and ensemble singing with the goal of understanding these musical styles and experiencing the joy of public performance. May be repeated 4 times for a total of 4 credits. 1 Credit.

    Prerequisite: Audition or permission of instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 142 - Musical Production

    3 Credits

    A select group of actor/singers and musicians whose main goal is to rehearse and perform a Broadway musical production. Students will learn the vocal and dance portion of performing in a full scale musical production. Students will experience costumed and staged live performances. May be repeated 4 times for a total of 12 credits.

    Prerequisite: Audition or permission of instructor.

    MUS 145 - Jazz Combo

    1 Credit

    Rehearsal and performance of traditional jazz standards, Latin, avant-garde and pop instrumental, music for small combo (piano, bass, drums, guitar, and some horns such as saxophone and trumpet). Rehearsals include study of playing compositions with an emphasis on improvising in a small group format. Correct interpretation of classic jazz literature to modern styles is studied in this context of a small combo. Concert performances include major concerts twice each semester in MCC's Theatre, Atrium, or Student Center and there is the potential for additional on-campus or off-campus performances. (This course may be repeated 4 times for a total of 4 credits.)

    Prerequisite: Prior experience improvising in a jazz band or permission of instructor; corequisite: MUS 143/MUS 144 is highly recommended

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 146 - Vocal Jazz/Show Choir

    1 Credit

    A select group of singers and instrumentalists rehearsing and performing vocal music from the jazz and show choir repertoire. Emphasis will be on developing musicianship and ensemble singing with the goal of understanding these musical styles and experiencing the joy of public performance. May be repeated 4 times for a total of 4 credits.

    Prerequisite: Audition or permission of instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 150 - History of Rock 'n Roll

    3 Credits

    A survey course that traces the roots of rock 'n roll from its origins in blues and rock 'a billy through to present day styles. In addition to the musical styles, the course will also look at the cultural, economic and social influences that shaped this American musical pheonmena.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH)

    MUS 151 - Music Performance and Lessons

    2 Credits

    Provides students with an opportunity to develop their music abilities through solo or ensemble performances before college audiences, through individualized private study of instrumental or vocal music under the supervision of qualified teachers. A recital is performed during the semester in class and a jury (musical exam) is performed for the music faculty during exam week. A minimum of twelve (12) one-hour lessons is required. Cost of lessons is not included in MCC tuition. Technology of recording is studied including selection and placement of microphones, mixing of tracks to a digital computer program, and conversion to MP3s to create an audio portfolio. (May be repeated 4 times for a total of 8 credits.).

    Prerequisite: Music Department audition.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    MUS 159 - Aural Skills I

    1 Credit

    This course reinforces Music Theory concepts and develops skills in sight singing as well as melodic and rhythmic dictation.

    MUS 160 - Aural Skills II

    1 Credit

    This course is a continuation of Aural Skills I. It reinforces Music Theory concepts and develops skills in sight singing as well as melodic and rhythmic dictation.

    Prerequisite: MUS 159 or permission of instructor; corequisite: MUS 110 or permission of instructor

    MUS 201 - History of Music I

    3 Credits

    Music from antiquity through 1750, covering Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque style periods; essential score reading and listening to records outside of class.

    Prerequisites: Completion of a music theory course or music appreciation, and elementary skill in music reading or permission of the instructor.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-WC - Western Civilization (SWCV)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    MUS 202 - History of Music II

    3 Credits

    Music from 1750 through the present covering Classical, Romantic and Twentieth Century style periods; essential score reading and listening to records outside of class.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-WC

    Prerequisite: MUS 201 or permission of the instructor.

    MUS 209 - Music Theory III

    4 Credits

    A study of diatonic seventh chords, borrowed chords, secondary dominants, augmented sixth chords, chromatic and in harmonic modulation and musical forms of the Classic and Romantic Periods, sight-singing and harmonic and melodic dictation related to chromatic harmony, early 20th century techniques. Computer software is incorporated to reinforce music theory concepts, for ear training practice, and to typeset homework assignments.

    Prerequisite: MUS 110 or permission of the instructor.

    MUS 210 - Music Theory IV

    4 Credits

    Studies of 20th century techniques, with student compositions performed and evaluated in class. Computer software is incorporated to reinforce music theory concepts, for ear training practice, and to typeset homework assignments.

    Prerequisite: MUS 209 or permission of the instructor.

    MUS 221 - Voice Class II

    3 Credits

    Intermediate collegiate level study of vocal music with emphasis on developing diction, breath control, increasing vocal resonance, improving stage presence, and cultivating accuracy, artistry and musicianship. Students will study a wide variety of vocal materials; e.g., Elizabethian lute songs, classical and romantic art songs, as well as standards, "pop" styles, and Broadway show tunes.

    Prerequisites: MUS 121, prior vocal experience, or by audition.

    MUS 226 - Applied Piano Minor III

    1 Credit

    A course designed to increase essential keyboard skills and score reading; improve technique through the study and performance of collegiate level intermediate difficulty piano studies; and provide instruction in proper methods of accompanying, melodic and harmonic improvisation, and transposition.

    Prerequisite: MUS 127 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

    MUS 227 - Applied Piano Minor IV

    1 Credit

    A continuation of practical keyboard studies at the advanced intermediate (collegiate) level of study. Continued development of keyboard skills including SATB vocal score reading, harmonization, improvisation, transposition, and modulation. Instrumental score reading and instrumental accompaniment.

    Prerequisite: MUS 226 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

    MUS 253 - Music Business

    3 Credits

    This course will introduce the student to the different facets of the music business. The course will aim to increase the participant's knowledge of the inner workings of the business, as well as how they relate to one another. Areas of concentration are music publishing, income sources, recording studios, copyrights, recording companies, and other related avenues. Whether the student wants a career in teaching or performing, this course will give an overview of some of the things to expect.

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    MUS 259 - Aural Skills III

    1 Credit

    This course is a continuation of Aural Skills II. It reinforces Music Theory concepts and develops skills in sight singing as well as melodic and rhythmic dictation.

    Prerequisite: MUS 160 or permission of instructor; corequisite: MUS 209 or permission of instructor

    MUS 260 - Aural Skills IV

    1 Credit

    This course is a continuation of Aural Skills III. It reinforces Music Theory concepts and develops skills in sight singing as well as melodic and rhythmic dictation.

    Prerequisite: MUS 259 or permission of instructor; corequisite: MUS 210 or permission of instructor

    MUS 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

NUR - Nursing

    NUR 050 - Application of the Nursing Process

    No Credit

    Introduction to curriculum concepts with emphasis on the use of the nursing process as the student assesses the basic needs of clients. Selected nursing content from the core curriculum is discussed.

    Prerequisites: NUR 050 is required for students who are transferring into the program, admitted with advanced standing, or returning to the program after an absence of one year. Completion of NUR 050 requirement is valid for one year. Students reentering NUR 111 do not need to take NUR 050.

    NUR 110 - Foundations of Nursing

    1 Credit

    NUR 110 is a nonclinical course in which the foundation of professional nursing is examined through exploration of the healthcare delivery system, nursing roles, nursing origins, and the educational, legal, and ethical bases of practice. Future challenges for the nursing profession are introduced.

    NUR 111 - Fundamentals of Nursing

    7 Credits

    NUR 111 focuses on the Basic Needs of the non acute adult patient to provide quality, safe patient centered care for diverse populations.

    The MCC nursing program’s conceptual framework and the core competencies of Associate Degree Nursing practice: Professional Identity, Nursing Judgment, Human Flourishing, and Spirit of Inquiry, are introduced.

    Students use knowledge and science to begin to assess a patient’s ability to meet Basic Needs and to implement fundamental nursing interventions.

    Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in high school chemistry, biology and either Sequential Math, Math A Regents or High School Algebra or MTH 098; Corequisites: NUR 110; PSY 101; BIO 144; and MTH 104, MTH 150, MTH 160 or higher; unless previously taken.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    NUR 112 - Nursing Care of the Adult and Child-I

    8 Credits

    NUR 112 focuses on Basic Needs of adult and child patients using the Nursing Process to provide quality, safe patient centered care for diverse populations. Teamwork and collaboration are introduced and explored. Students use knowledge and science to manage, with assistance, the essential issues of patients with both acute and chronic conditions in several healthcare environments

    The core competencies of Associate Degree Nursing practice introduced in NUR 111 are expanded upon in clinical nursing practice.

    Prerequisites: NUR 110 and NUR 111 with a minimum grade of C, PSY 101, BIO 144 with a minimum grade of C; corequisites: BIO 145, PSY 212 and ENG 101 or ENG 200, unless previously taken.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    NUR 210 - Issues in Nursing

    1 Credit

    NUR 210 is a nonclinical course in which issues of professional nursing are critically examined through exploration of current themes including quality and safety initiatives, leadership and management practices, licensure and legal implications, employment matters and professional responsibility.

    Prerequisites: NUR 110 and NUR 112 with a minimum grade of C.

    MCC General Education: MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    NUR 211 - Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing (Seven Weeks)

    4 Credits

    NUR 211 focuses on the Basic Needs of patients with psychiatric/mental health problems using the Nursing Process to provide quality, safe patient centered care for diverse populations through teamwork and collaboration. Students use knowledge and science to manage the issues of patients with acute and chronic psychiatric conditions in a variety of healthcare environments.

    The core competencies of Associate Degree Nursing practice expanded upon in NUR 112 are applied to this patient population.

    Prerequisites: NUR 112 with a minimum grade of C, BIO 144 & BIO 145 with a minimum grade of C, PSY 212 and ENG 101; corequisites: NUR 210, BIO 202 and SOC 101, unless previously taken.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    NUR 212 - Maternal - Neonatal Nursing

    4 Credits

    NUR 212 focuses on the basic needs of maternal and neonatal patients, using the Nursing Process to provide quality, safe, patient centered care for diverse populations through teamwork and collaboration. Students use knowledge and science to manage maternal and neonatal considerations in the acute care setting.

    The core competencies of Associate Degree Nursing practice expanded upon in NUR 112 are applied to this patient population.

    Prerequisites: NUR 112 with a minimum grade of C, BIO 145 with a minimum grade of C, PSY 212 and ENG 101; corequisites: NUR 210, BIO 202, SOC 101, unless previously taken.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    NUR 214 - Nursing Care of the Adult and Child-II

    8 Credits

    NUR 214 focuses on basic needs of adult and child patients using the Nursing Process to provide quality, safe patient centered care for diverse populations through teamwork and collaboration. Students use knowledge and science to manage the complex issues of patients with both acute and chronic conditions in a variety of healthcare environments.
    The core competencies of Associate Degree Nursing practice are integrated into clinical nursing practice.

    Prerequisites: SOC 101, BIO 202 with a minimum grade of C, NUR 210, 211, 212 with a minimum grade of C; corequisites: 3 credits Humanities electives, 1 credit Physical/Health Education, unless previously completed.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    NUR 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

OFT - Office Technology

    OFT 110 - Keyboarding

    3 Credits

    A course designed to learn touch keyboarding and to develop speed and accuracy. An introduction to the Windows environment and word processing using Microsoft Word for the creation of basic business documents. Open to all students. Recommended for those with no keyboarding experience or those who key less than 25 words per minute.

    OFT 111 - Intermediate Word

    3 Credits

    Development of formatting skills through Microsoft Word. Preparation of business documents including letters, memorandums, reports and tables, and an introduction to newsletters and electronic communication. Emphasis on proofreading, production, and mailability skills. Recommended for those who type more than 30 NWAM for five minutes within five errors. Students should have had a minimum of one semester of keyboarding instruction.

    Prerequisite: OFT 110 or permission of instructor.

    OFT 112 - Advanced Word I

    3 Credits

    An intermediate course emphasizing enhanced formatting skills utilizing Microsoft Word. Production of malleable business documents with advanced features. Composition and creation of business correspondence will be infused throughout the course. Integrating decision making and problem solving skills are stressed. Continued emphasis on speed development and accuracy.

    Prerequisite: OFT 111 with a grade of C- or better.

    OFT 121 - Introduction to Keyboarding

    1 Credit

    This course will cover alphabetic, numeric and symbol keys. Straight copy speed and accuracy rates are developed, as well as proofreading skills. No word processing skills are covered. No prior computer skills necessary.

    OFT 141 - Professional Grammar and Communications

    4 Credits

    A presentation and review of grammar, including punctuation, capitalization, number styles, and sentence structure, for accurate business usage. A three-level learning approach is used to facilitate comprehension and to promote a mastery level of grammar by providing graduated learning segments. Students will apply grammar skills in the composition and formatting of business documents to include letters, memos, e-mail messages, and reports.

    Completion of TRS 105 or TRS 200 or placement in ENG 101 or higher.

    OFT 170 - Spreadsheet Applications Excel

    3 Credits

    An intensive course covering Microsoft Excel. Objectives include preparing, formatting, and enhancing worksheets, applying formulas and functions, charting, using analysis, linking, workgroup features, and increase productivity through use of macros and templates. This course is designed to teach skill sets needed for the Microsoft Office Certification Exam. Knowledge of the personal computer, keyboard, and mouse is strongly recommended. A student may earn credit for OFT 170 or CRC 170, but cannot earn credit for both courses because they are equivalent courses.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    OFT 171 - Microsoft Access Professional

    3 Credits

    An intensive course that covers Microsoft Access. Objectives include planning and designing databases; building and modifying tables, forms and reports; advanced manipulation of data; defining relationships; modification of report properties; subforms, switchboards, PivotTables, and importing/exporting data. This course is designed to cover skill sets needed for the Microsoft Office Certification Exam. Knowledge of the personal computer, keyboard, and mouse is strongly recommended.

    OFT 173 - Microsoft Multimedia Communications

    3 Credits

    This course will offer a thorough coverage of Microsoft PowerPoint, Microsoft Outlook, and Microsoft Publisher for the office professional. Microsoft PowerPoint instruction will cover animation, use of color and objects, and importing and exporting data and images. Activities include creating a slide show as well as delivering the presentation. Microsoft Publisher will focus on production, assembling, and the design of administrative publications. Topics will include designing page layout, creating graphics, using templates, manipulating text and graphics, using style sheets, scanning images, and adding special effects. Microsoft Outlook covers uses of communicating by e-mail, managing contacts, calendaring, address book, and schedule management. Knowledge of the personal computer, keyboard, and mouse is strongly recommended.

    OFT 201 - Advanced Word II

    2 Credits

    Advanced formatting skills of complex business documents utilizing Microsoft Word applications. Orientation to collaborative work concepts. Topics covered include graphics, complex mail merges, electronic forms, macros, and long document production utilizing master and subdocuments. Projects integrate decision-making, problem-solving, and language arts skills. Continued development of speed and accuracy.

    Prerequisite: OFT 112 with a grade of C- or better.

    OFT 202 - Office Simulations

    2 Credits

    This course covers office simulations and projects that draw from all aspects of Microsoft Office Professional software. Realistic workplace projects integrate business vocabulary, critical thinking strategies, and web-research skills into document processing.

    Prerequisite/Corequisite: OFT 201, or permission of instructor.

    OFT 214 - Administrative Office Procedures

    4 Credits

    This course presents concepts and procedures used in today’s electronic office. It encompasses discussions on professional conduct and ethics, job readiness techniques, and small group collaboration. Other topics include the use of communication devices and equipment, use of electronic mail, records management, reprographics technology, administrative travel procedures, Internet research and reference procedures. Oral and written communication skills will be emphasized.

    Prerequisites: OFT 112 and OFT 141.

    OFT 240 - Office Transcription

    3 Credits

    An introduction to and development of transcription skills from dictated material. A review of grammar and punctuation along with an emphasis on spelling and word study skills. An introduction to the malleability concept during transcription practice with the goal of malleability in testing situations.

    Prerequisites: OFT 111 with a grade of C- or better and OFT 141.

    OFT 267 - Medical Office Documentation

    3 Credits

    Students will use medical terminology and keyboarding skills in transcribing medical documents for major medical fields. Emphasis on accuracy, document formatting, grammar principles, production, and understanding of the responsibilities and competencies of the medical office support staff.

    Prerequisites: HIM 104 and OFT 111 and OFT 141.

    OFT 268 - Medical Office Procedures

    3 Credits

    The duties and responsibilities of a medical office will be covered, including proper telephone techniques, preparation of medical records, appointment books (paper and electronic), preparation of standard insurance forms, billing, maintenance of petty cash book, handling of incoming and outgoing mail, confidentiality and legal considerations, and office management. Computer simulation projects are included.

    OFT 270 - Office Technology Seminar and Work Practicum

    2 Credits

    This seminar course provides the student with a capstone experience to prepare for employment within the office technology field. The course will examine situations and problems related to the workplace. Students are required to attend a weekly one-hour seminar and complete a 45-hour office work experience with a cooperating employer.

    Prerequisite(s): OFT 112, OFT 141. Co-requisite: OFT 214.

    OFT 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

OPT - Optical Systems Technology

    OPT 110 - Introduction to Optical Technology

    3 Credits

    Familiarizes students with the important aspects of technical optics, including terminology, fundamentals and principles, optical instruments and their relation to mechanics and electronics; wave optics including such recent developments as lasers; optical processes and testing techniques, and photography and its uses. This course should provide the student with an appreciation of how optics may be related to their own major interests.

    MCC General Education: MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    OPT 131 - Optical Elements and Ray Optics

    4 Credits

    An introductory course dealing with terminology and techniques in the use of analytical and laboratory methods for planning, executing and evaluating arrangements using components such as mirrors, prisms, thin and thick lenses, diffusers, stops, reticles, and various types of light sources. Reflection, refraction, dispersion, image formation and aberrations are studied with emphasis on the ray concept of light.

    (Students not enrolled in an optical technology program may be admitted to the class with approval of the Department Chairperson.)

    OPT 135 - Measurement and Analysis

    4 Credits

    The student will study the engineering team and the role of the technician on that team. The student will work with basic measurement tools and study the fundamental concepts of metrology. Computer analysis of data using MS Excel will be introduced, including some Six Sigma basic quality control tools. Basic use of Windows PC is expected.

    OPT 151 - Optical Instruments and Testing

    4 Credits

    Concepts developed in OPT 131 are applied to the study of illumination and photometry, colorimetry, testing techniques for optical components and systems including the eye, telescope, microscope, photographic systems and optical methods of dimensional measurement.

    Prerequisite: OPT 131.

    OPT 153 - Fiber Optics

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the use and testing of fiber optic cable. Cable termination and splicing techniques will be performed. Standard tests of cables and cable systems will be conducted.

    Prerequisites: OPT 131 or OPT 110 and MTH 140, or permission of department.

    OPT 201 - Photo Science

    4 Credits

    The chemical, optical and physical principles of the photographic system. In a series of laboratory assignments, the student gains experience in the use of a wide variety of equipment, as well as techniques of photographic testing of the system for image quality, information capacity, densitometry and sensitometry. Each student plans and executes a pictorial presentation related to a technical project.

    Prerequisites: OPT 131, OPT 151 and OPT 211, or permission of instructor or permission of department.

    OPT 211 - Wave Optics and Applications

    4 Credits

    A study of light waves and how they may be used in today's technology. Electromagnetic radiation, coherence, interference and diffraction phenomena, transfer functions and the generation and use of polarized light. Analysis, manufacturing techniques and use of selected instruments using wave optics such as spectrometers, interferometers, diffraction gratings and thin film coatings. An introduction to properties and use of lasers and holography.

    Prerequisites: OPT 151 and MTH 140, or permission of department.

    OPT 213 - Optical Processes

    4 Credits

    A study of selected materials, processes and test measurement techniques employed in the manufacture of modern optical instruments, including physical principles and equipment used. In the laboratory portion, each student has opportunity to perform all steps in planning, tooling, fabricating, testing, coating and finishing precision optical elements such as telescope mirrors.

    Prerequisites: OPT 135

    OPT 215 - Electro-Optical Devices and Systems

    5 Credits

    Optical and electro-optical instrument phenomena: radiometry, spectrophotommetry detector characteristics, blackbody radiation, light sources and their spectra, electronic instrument use, electronic device specifications, fiber optics and fiber optic systems.

    Prerequisites: OPT 211, MTH 141, ELT 111

    OPT 231 - Lasers: Technology and Application

    4 Credits

    This course will stress laser applications in science and industry, including measurement, communication, machining, information recording and holography. The basic principles of laser operation, construction and technology will be discussed in such a way that the student will be able to suggest and implement new ideas, and understand old ones, concerning laser applications and holography. The laboratory will include the actual recording and processing of holograms and other laser experiments.

    Prerequisite: OPT 211 or permission of department.

    OPT 235 - Advanced Optical Manufacturing

    4 Credits

    A study of current processes, machinery and tools employing CNC technology that are shaping the methodology in manufacturing optical components. The course is designed to be very interactive, providing laboratory experience on the following subjects: CNC grinding and polishing, planetary grinding and polishing, tolerancing and metrology.

    Prerequisite: OPT 213 or permission of department.

    OPT 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

PE - Physical Education--Coed

    PE 101 - Co-ed Personal Fitness

    2 Credits

    A course designed to develop the student's awareness of, and responsibility for, his/her own personal fitness. It is primarily a lecture class, but does include a comprehensive physical fitness screening component. The course material will provide the student with sound criteria for decision making with regard to their own physical fitness.

PEC - Physical Education--Coed

    PEC 123 - Introduction to Kayaking

    2 Credits

    An introduction to the lifetime activity of kayaking. Developing and implementing alternative methods for achieving health and wellness through the development of skills and development of a fitness plan. This course will cover equipment components needed to kayak safely as well as basic strokes, reading the river, rescue techniques, and how to roll a kayak.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    PEC 148 - Physical Fitness Theory and Practice

    2 Credits

    This course is designed to provide a complete fitness experience. This course includes sections specific to different areas of activity including, but not limited to: Fitness Training, Yoga, Tai Chi, Tae Kwon Do, Cardio Bootcamp, Aqua Fitness, Personal Defense (offerings may vary from semester to semester). It will also include a comprehensive fitness assessment and interpretation that will generate a personalized exercise prescription, which will be executed in a monitored program specific to assigned fitness subject, topic, or theme. Lecture topics will include the benefits of exercise, safety, program design, components of fitness, and other timely topics. The online section(s) of this class require(s) outside physical activity and testing outside the online medium.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    PEC 150 - Adventure Bound

    2 Credits

    A course in which the student will participate in a variety of provocative community/outdoor oriented experiences and classroom presentations. High and low project adventure ropes courses, trust and initiative games, camping and survival skills, circus acrosports, canoeing and hiking sojourns, service to populations at risk, etc., are a few of the adventure experience options from which the student will select several to participate in.

    PEC 151 - Men's and Women's Physical Education: Co-ed Golf

    1 Credit

    An introductory course on the basic skills, strategies and techniques of golf.

    PEC 157 - Men's and Women's Physical Education: Co-ed Racquetball

    1 Credit

    A course introducing the basic skills, rules and strategies of racquetball. The course will include safety, basic strokes and positioning for singles, doubles and cut-throat.

    PEC 179 - Lifeguarding

    2 Credits

    A full semester course to certify students in American Red Cross lifeguarding. Lifeguards must have the ability to recognize hazardous waterfront situations and respond accordingly. The student must pass Red Cross written and swimming skills tests. This course includes CPR for the Professional Rescuer and First Aid. At the completion of this course, the student will receive a Lifeguard Training Card (which includes CPR for the Professional Rescuer and a Community First Aid Card). American Red Cross Administration Fee is $5.00.

    PEC 194 - Downhill Skiing/Snowboarding

    1 Credit

    This course provides each participating student an opportunity to learn and improve his or her skiing/snowboarding skills. Classes meet for lessons at Bristol Mountain on six scheduled evenings. Skiing available before and after lessons. Students must provide their own transportation to Bristol Mountain. An additional fee is charged to the student and payable to Bristol Mountain for lessons and/or rental of equipment.

    PEC 250 - Fitness and Wellness

    3 Credits

    A course designed to provide an enhanced fitness and wellness experience. The content includes the assessment of present fitness level and the development and practice of a balanced, individualized physical fitness program. Additionally, the course provides a theory based and practical experience in Stress Management and explores the roles of Stress and Exercise on Wellness. The online section(s) of this class require outside physical activity and testing.

    Students taking PEC 250 may take one, but not both, of the following courses in addition to this course: PEC 148, PEC 253.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    PEC 253 - Stress Management

    2 Credits

    A course designed to make the student aware of stress and how it can impact his/her quality of life. It will provide methods for identifying stressors and strategies to effectively manage them. Students will be able to construct a personalized life style management program.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

PEJ - Physical Education-Criminal Justice

    PEJ 101 - Physical Fitness I - Criminal Justice

    2 Credits

    A specialized physical education program for Criminal Justice students. The course will emphasize an understanding of physical fitness and its direct application to the Criminal Justice profession. Specific instructions will cover physical fitness, running, tumbling, swimming, and self-evaluation and exercise program development.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

PEM - Physical Education--Men

    PEM 132 - Basketball

    1 Credit

    A course introducing the basic skills, rules, and strategies of basketball. Class will be divided into teams and various types of competition will be engaged in, as well as practice sessions to improve skills.

PEW - Physical Education-Women

    PEW 148 - Fitness for Women

    2 Credits

    A course designed to provide a complete fitness experience specifically for women. The content includes the assessment of present fitness level and the development and practice of a balanced, individualized physical fitness program. The emphasis of the course is the specialized needs of women in relation to fitness and exercise, the responses of women to exercise, and the special problems faced by women in fitness activities. The online section(s) of this class require outside physical activity and testing.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

PHL - Philosophy

    PHL 101 - Introduction to Philosophy

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the fundamental questions of philosophy, including such issues as determinism, freedom, and responsibility; the relationship of mind to body; the grounds and limits of human knowledge; and the existence and nature of God.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    PHL 102 - Introduction to Logic

    3 Credits

    A study of the inductive and deductive processes of reasoning in the light of classical and contemporary thought, including the analysis of ordinary language and its pitfalls, and the relation of logic to scientific inquiry and method.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT)

    PHL 103 - Introduction to Ethics

    3 Credits

    An introduction to basic problems in ethics, emphasizing theories of the good life, the morally good person, and morally right action, and their application to the most significant ethical questions in contemporary society, such as abortion, euthanasia, human sexuality, social and economic justice, violence, and use of the environment.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    PHL 105 - Technology and Values

    3 Credits

    A study of the ways that the advance of technology relates to the development of values. The course will investigate how we evaluate and respond to technology, and will examine technology's impact upon such values as freedom, individuality, growth, work, and the political process. The course includes topics that computer science and engineering technology students need to understand, such as: the unique ethical problems in information technology; ethical practices to minimize computer misuse; ACM/IEEE Software Engineering Codes of Ethics and Professional Practice; the morality of software piracy; hacking and viruses as well as questions raised by globalization.

    Learning Attributes: WR, GR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    PHL 108 - World Religions: Western Traditions

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the academic study of religion through the exploration of some of the major Western religious traditions of the world. This course examines the historical development, the fundamental doctrines and beliefs, practices, institutions, and cultural expressions of Western religious traditions. This course also addresses some of the essential differences and similarities that exist among Western religious traditions, and points to the uniqueness of each of them. The course includes the examination of ancient religious culture, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-H in addition to the other listed category below.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-WC - Western Civilization (SWCV)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    PHL 109 - World Religions: Eastern Traditions

    3 Credits

    This course is an introduction to the major Asian religions and the methods of the academic study of religion. The course examines the history, doctrines and beliefs, practices, institutions, and cultural expressions of religions originating in Asia. This examination supports study of the differences and similarities among religions originating in Asia, and the mutual effects of Asian and non-Asian religions on each other in various parts of the world. Students have the opportunity to explore for themselves conceptions of humanity, duty, and virtue derived from the Asian religions.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-H in addition to the other listed category below.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    PHL 210 - Human Rights and Democracy in Domestic and International Contexts

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to (i) the general conceptual and normative claims of democracy and the modern human rights movement and (ii) specific problems of democracy and human rights. General issues include the role and limits of national sovereignty and the moral and legal bases of human rights. Specific problems are drawn from among the following: genocide and humanitarian intervention, global poverty, religious liberty and religious tolerance, feminism and the roles of women, cultural differences in conceptions of democracy and human rights. We study both conceptual and practical issues in democracy and human rights.

    Learning Attributes: WR, GR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    PHL 250 - Professional Ethics

    3 Credits

    A study of ethical principles and of ethical problems in the professional world. The course is intended to provide students with the ability to analyze ethical situations within a specific profession such as health care, business, and public administration. The course includes lectures, discussions, case analyses, the study of codes of ethics, and individual projects. The topic for each semester is indicated in the course title. The course may not be repeated for additional credit hours.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-BCW - Writing (MBCW), MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    PHL 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

PHO - Photography

    PHO 101 - Photography for Non-Majors I

    3 Credits

    A course which may be used by students wishing to employ photography for personal expression as well as those wishing to learn about traditional and contemporary photographic techniques. Students acquire skills in the use of photographic equipment and processes including developing negatives and producing finished enlargements, as well as contemporary digital tools. All equipment necessary to complete the course is made available to the students, who may also use the coursework to achieve better results from any equipment they may own. Students supply film and photographic paper.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    PHO 106 - Photography I

    3 Credits

    Introduction to the principles, techniques, and theories of the photographic process. The course examines the fundamentals of photographic equipment and digital procedures, including exposure, organization and enhancement of digital photographic images. Natural light assignments will be supported by lectures and demonstrations. Student supplies digital manually adjustable camera and external hard drive.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-A - The Arts (SART)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    PHO 113 - Photography II

    3 Credits

    An intermediate photographic course with emphasis on exposure control, white balance and mixed lighting situations, studio and location lighting techniques. Assignments designed for visual impact, image communication, technical and aesthetic qualities. Student supplies camera, photographic inkjet paper, and removable flash unit.

    Prerequisite: PHO 106 or permission of instructor

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    PHO 135 - Digital Photography for the Arts

    3 Credits

    An introduction to the technical, operational and creative aspects of digital photography. The course focuses on the application of foundational design skills and creative strategies to the medium of digital photography. Techniques of planning, refining, capturing and enhancing images are explored in a computer lab setting. Hands-on experience with digital cameras and photographic imaging software is emphasized. Students will be required to demonstrate their comprehension of the technical and aesthetic aspects of digital photography by solving a series of creative problems and by creating a portfolio documenting their art from other classes.

    Prerequisite: ART 109

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    PHO 140 - History of Photography: Early

    3 Credits

    Through a review of photographic technologies and traditions prior to World War I, photography's contribution to nineteenth century visual art is examined within the context of social, cultural, political, economic, and scientific impact. Specific topics will include: the portraiture industry; medical, criminal, and ethnographic photography; war documentation; travel and exploration photography; photography as a tool for social reform; and the medium’s relationship to the fine arts. Illustrated presentations, lectures, research, field trips and discussion.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    PHO 145 - History of Photography: Modern

    3 Credits

    A critical analysis of post World War I photography which questions the medium’s role in art, journalism, propaganda, advertising, and everyday life. Major movements, practitioners, and leading photographic theoreticians are examined in the context of photography’s ability to record the “truth” and influence social and cultural identity. Illustrated lectures and presentations, discussion, field trips, and individual research projects.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-H - Humanities (SHUM)

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

    PHO 164 - Digital Imaging

    3 Credits

    As an introduction to the technical and aesthetic fundamentals of digital photographic imaging, this course introduces students to non-destructive editing techniques to modify, manipulate, and enhance photographic images for use in various visual communication fields. The course will address all stages of file management, including the capture, export, enhancement and manipulation, uploading, and printing of photographic images.

    PHO 106 or permission of instructor.

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    PHO 213 - Studio Photography

    4 Credits

    This course is designed to introduce the student to an advanced production of color digital photographs. Utilizing a strong studio component, the application of large format cameras and electronic strobe lighting will be explored in a variety of settings, including portraiture, illustration, and commercial assignments.

    Prerequisite: COM 106 or PHO 106 or COM 113 or PHO 113 or permission of instructor

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-TL - Technological Literacy (MTL)

    PHO 223 - Photojournalism and Documentation

    3 Credits

    An advanced course in applied photography that introduces the equipment, techniques, skills and concepts of a photographic document. Class includes both the creation of original documentary photographs, as well as the editing, sequencing, captioning and layout of a photo essay.

    Prerequisite: COM 106 or PHO 106 or COM 113 or PHO 113 or permission of instructor

    MCC General Education: MCC-AH - Arts and Humanities (MAH), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    PHO 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

PHY - Physics

    PHY 100 - Preparatory Physics

    4 Credits

    This course is suggested for those who have not successfully completed high school physics or have an inadequate preparation in mathematics or physics. It is also a preparatory course for students intending to follow the Applied Physics sequence. Topics will include problem solving techniques, velocity, acceleration, force, Newton’s Laws of Motion, momentum, energy, and conservation laws.

    Prerequisite: MTH 104 or MTH 135 taken concurrently or previously completed.

    PHY 105 - Automotive Physics

    4 Credits

    The objective of this course is to provide automotive technicians with an understanding of the physical principles that apply to the automotive systems that they must maintain and repair. Topics will include mechanics, gases, fluids, heat transfer, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and electronics. Proper use of measurement equipment and data acquisition systems will be stressed.

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Automotive Technology Program Coordinator.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    PHY 120 - Physics for Non-Majors Laboratory

    1 Credit

    A laboratory course to supplement class lectures in PHY 121. Exercises will cover motion, Newton's Laws, energy, electricity, magnetism, optics and modern physics. Computers will be used extensively to collect and analyze data, process video images, and run simulations. NOTE: This course only meets SUNY General Education Natural Science requirements when both PHY 120 and PHY 121 are successfully completed.

    Prerequisites: PHY 121 may be taken concurrently or previously completed.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    PHY 121 - Physics for Non-Majors I

    3 Credits

    A non-mathematical course in classical and modern physics; intended for those seeking a natural science elective. Topics include gravitation, electricity and magnetism, the nature of light, Einstein's Theories of Relativity, Quantum Mechanics, blackholes, and the Big Bang. Students interested in taking a transferable laboratory science course should enroll in PHY 120 concurrently. NOTE: Students who successfully complete PHY 121 may, with addition of PHY 120, complete the requirement of SUNY Natural Science General Education. PHY 120 may be taken concurrently or in a later semester, but the student will not have satisfied the SUNY requirement until both PHY 120 and PHY 121 are successfully completed.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    PHY 131 - Applied Physics I

    4 Credits

    An introductory course in physics at an intermediate mathematical level. Appropriate for non-science majors and those in the engineering technologies. Topics to include statics, dynamics, mechanical work and energy, conservation of momentum, and rotational dynamics.

    Prerequisite: MTH 140 or MTH 165 taken concurrently or previously completed.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    PHY 132 - Applied Physics II

    4 Credits

    A continuation of PHY 131. Topics to include the properties of materials, temperature, heat and thermodynamics, vibrational motion, wave motion, sound, and geometrical and physical optics.

    Prerequisites: PHY 131; MTH 141 or MTH 165 taken concurrently or previously completed.

    PHY 141 - Radiographic Physics

    3 Credits

    An introductory course in electricity, magnetism, and radiation physics, stressing the basic principles underlying the operation of x-ray equipment and auxiliary devices. Topics will include AC and DC circuits, electromagnetism, electronics, production and detection of x-rays, and x-ray machine circuitry.

    Prerequisite: XRT 111

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    PHY 145 - College Physics I

    4 Credits

    An introductory course in classical mechanics at the mathematical level of intermediate algebra and trigonometry. Intended for transfer students seeking a laboratory science elective and for those in life science and pre-professional programs. Topics include vectors, translational and rotational kinematics and dynamics, work and energy, impulse and momentum, and simple harmonic motion. Also available summer.

    Prerequisite: Either MTH 140 or MTH 165 taken concurrently or previously completed.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    PHY 146 - College Physics II

    4 Credits

    A continuation of PHY 145. Topics include electrostatics, electric potential and energy, DC circuits, magnetism and electromagnetic induction, electromagnetic waves and wave properties, optics, and modern physics.

    (Prerequisites: PHY 145 with a grade of C or higher; MTH 141 (may be taken concurrently)or MTH 165.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI)

    PHY 154 - General Physics I

    4 Credits

    An introductory course in classical mechanics and waves using calculus. The course is intended primarily for transfer students pursuing computer science and pre-professional programs that require the study of physics using calculus.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-NS

    Prerequisite: MTH 210 completed prior to beginning PHY 154.

    PHY 155 - General Physics II

    4 Credits

    A continuation of PHY 154. Topics to include electricity and magnetism, DC and AC circuits, optics, and topics from modern physics.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-NS

    Prerequisite: PHY 154 with a grade of C or higher.

    PHY 161 - University Physics 1

    4 Credits

    An introductory course in classical mechanics using calculus; intended for those seeking a concentration in engineering, mathematics, or natural science. Topics include kinematics, Newton's Laws, work, energy, momentum, rotational motion of rigid bodies, and harmonic motion.

    Prerequisites: MTH 211 taken concurrently or previously completed; high school Regents physics with a grade of 70 or higher or PHY 131 with a grade of C or higher, or PHY 145 with a grade of C or higher.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    PHY 261 - University Physics II

    4 Credits

    An introduction to electric and magnetic fields. Topics include Coulomb's, Gauss's, Biot-Savart, Ampere's, Faraday's Laws, and Maxwell's Equations.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 161 with a grade of C or higher and MTH 211 with a grade of C or higher.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-NS - Natural Sciences (SNSC)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-QL - Quantitative Literacy (MQL)

    PHY 262 - Modern Physics

    4 Credits

    An introductory course in modern physics for those who have completed two semesters of University Physics. Topics include relativity, quantum mechanics, and the application of quantum mechanics to atomic and nuclear structure.

    Prerequisites: PHY 261 with a grade of C or higher; MTH 212 or MTH 225 taken concurrently or previously completed.

    PHY 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

PLE - Police: Law Enforcement

    PLE 101 - Fundamentals of Policing

    14 Credits

    This course examines and introduces recruit officers to the criminal justice system with special emphasis on the roles and responsibilities of police officers. Focuses on the legal basis for law enforcement operations starting with the United States Constitution and specifically exploring the State of New York: Penal Law, Criminal Procedure Law, Vehicle and traffic Law, and Juvenile Procedures. Report writing skills are taught and practiced. Recruit officers are introduced to defensive tactics-basic techniques used by police officers. Recruit officers are introduced to physical fitness and wellness designed to meet the needs of law enforcement professionals including a pre-test. Must be a sworn police officer or peace officer employed or sponsored by a law enforcement agency.

    PLE 102 - Police Proficiencies and Procedures

    18 Credits

    This course focuses on the proficiencies and procedures applied through critical thinking techniques and hands-on development. Analytical, investigative techniques are developed. Application of the scientific method to criminal and traffic investigation is developed. Firearms training, Emergency vehicle operation, and emergency medical service skills are developed. Intermediate defensive tactics skills and intermediate physical fitness training and wellness including a mid-test are further developed. Must be a sworn police officer or peace officer employed or sponsored by a law enforcement agency.

    PLE 103 - The Community and Policing: Serving Special Populations

    14 Credits

    This course is designed to give each officer insight into the cultural diversity and special needs of the community he/she will serve. Special emphasis is placed on ethical issues, stress and community resources and services. The course will also teach the officer how to effectively and compassionately deal with child abuse cases, emotionally disturbed persons, conflict management and persons with disabilities, as well as how to become a crime prevention resource. Advanced defensive tactics training with proficiency testing and advanced physical fitness and wellness training and final testing included in this course. Must be a sworn police officer or peace officer employed or sponsored by a law enforcement agency.

    PLE 104 - Practicum in Policing I

    4 Credits

    This four-week course is designed to place police recruits into an application laboratory experience where they apply the basic principles, theories, and techniques taught in the training academy. The officer/deputy recruits are under close supervision of an assessment professional - the Field Training Officer. Successful completion of this course leads to certification as a Police Officer by the NYS Bureau for Municipal Police. Also offered in Summer.

    Prerequisites: PLE 101, PLE 102, PLE 103.

    PLE 108 - Corrections Officer Basic Training

    22 Credits

    This course examines the operations of the criminal justice system with general emphasis on the role and responsibility of a corrections officer. This 15-week course is designed to prepare a student for a career in the corrections field. It is a knowledge and skills based program. The course focuses on the legal basis for the corrections system, starting with a review of the United States Constitution; exploring the New York State Penal and Criminal Procedure Laws. It also covers those personal and professional skills necessary to each successful corrections officer. State certification is awarded upon successful completion. Student must be hired and sworn as a corrections officer.

    PLE 131 - Breath Analysis Operator

    2 Credits

    This course is designed to prepare students to operate a variety of breath test equipment and be able to correctly interpret the findings of the tests. The chemical composition of alcohol is explored, as well as show the various instruments analyze the subject's breath for measurable traces of alcohol. The student is eligible for New York State certification upon successful completion of this course.

    Prerequisite: Must be a sworn police or peace officer.

    PLE 140 - Criminal Investigation

    4.5 Credits

    The criminal investigations course will provide students with the knowledge and skills required to conduct basic investigations. The course will also provide students with the knowledge and skills required to develop resources to assist in investigations. Seventy class hours for the semester.
    Prerequisite: Current law enforcement officer status, or acceptable alternative as authorized by Public Safety Training Facility. 4.5 Credits

    Prerequisite: Current law enforcement officer status, or acceptable alternative as authorized by Public Safety Training Facility.

    PLE 151 - Police Baton (PR-24)

    2 Credits

    This course will provide students with the methods to instruct others in the use of the PR-24 Police Baton. The student will be required to demonstrate proficiency with the PR-24, as well as test their knowledge on the use of force as defined in New York State Penal law. Instructional techniques will be discussed and the student will be tested on their ability to instruct others.

    PLE 153 - RADAR/LIDAR Operator

    2 Credits

    This course will train students in the proper use of RADAR speed detection instruments. The curriculum includes RADAR theory, vehicle and traffic law, court preparation and presentation. Each student will develop skills in calibrating the RADAR equipment and practice speed estimates.

    Prerequisite: Must be a sworn police or peace officer.

    PLE 165 - Enhanced In-Service

    .5-1 Credit

    Designed for public safety professionals, this course provides 7-15 hours
    of annual, required common core instruction, including updates on changes
    in the field. This instruction will be encompassed from the Bureau of
    Municipal Police, Office of Public Safety general subject areas for police in-
    service education. The subject areas will be legal issues, police and the
    public, police procedures, mechanics of arrest, and educational electives.
    A lecturer/facilitator will present this instruction. At the conclusion of this course the participant will be given an authentic assessment consisting of one or more of the following: written test, oral exam, oral reporting, practical performance exam of skills learned or peer assessment. Due to the annual requirement of instruction, this course may be taken more than once.

    PLE 201 - Interview and Interrogation

    2 Credits

    The program is designed to provide investigators with proven techniques that can be applied in various accusatory and non-accusatory interview situations. Participants will develop skills in preparing for the interrogation with a "game plan" which emphasizes a pro-active rather than reactive role. Participants will learn what to expect, what to look for, and how to interpret what is happening in the interrogation setting. A series of lectures, video tape exercises, practical hands-on classroom experiences, and evening assignments are used in the instruction. The program includes up-to-date information on the legal aspects of interrogation and admissibility of the confession into court. Student must be in service as a public safety professional.

    PLE 202 - Tactical Warrant Service and Building Searches

    2 Credits

    This course will educate public safety officers assigned to conduct building searches and narcotic search warrants. The curriculum includes situational risk analysis, legal issues and liability, planning, briefing, critiquing exercises, Active Countermeasures, Dynamic and Covert Entry techniques, weapons control and retention, and basic and advanced shooting skills. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate their proficiency by written test, oral report, practical exam of performance skills, and peer assessment. Must be a sworn police or peace officer.

    PLE 204 - Practicum in Policing II

    16 Credits

    This sixteen-week course places the recruit officer/deputy into an application laboratory experience in which his/her degree of direct involvement accelerates with experience. He/she applies the principles, theories and techniques taught in the academy stage, to the operating demands of the street. The officer/deputy is under the close and continuous supervision of a specially trained assessment professional - the Field Training Officer. Successful completion of this course leads to certification as a Police Officer by the NYS Bureau of Municipal Police. Also offered in Summer.

    Prerequisites: PLE 101, PLE 102, PLE 103.

    PLE 210 - Police Supervision

    6 Credits

    The purpose of the course in Police Supervision is to insure that law enforcement officers newly promoted to supervisory rank receive a course of professional training in the principles of supervision and management to prepare them to carry out their duties properly. This course reflects a balanced overview of the role of the supervisor and also provides an understanding of the knowledge and the skills needed by the supervisor to function effectively, efficiently, and professionally. Special emphasis is placed on incident management, leadership skills, communications, and resource development. Student must be a law enforcement professional who is in line for promotion.

    PLE 220 - Instructor Development Course

    4.5 Credits

    Public safety professionals have important knowledge and skills obtained through study and life experience. This course will provide the tools for the Bureau of Municipal Police instructor candidate to develop the research, preparation, and communication skills necessary for effective presentations. The focus is on training needs, writing instructional objectives, lesson planning, graphic support, adult learning concepts, communication skills, the instructional process, and assessment. Participants will be required to develop and deliver a fifty-minute instructional block on a police topic of their choice. Student must be in service as a public safety professional.

    PLE 221 - Field Training and Evaluation

    2 Credits

    This course will provide the proper concepts of leadership and techniques of assessment, counseling, and documentation necessary for an experienced public safety professional to supervise and evaluate newly assigned recruit officers who have completed the academic component of basic recruit training. The focus is to develop the abilities of the experienced public safety professional to assist the recruit in a smooth transition from academic lecture to street reality. Successful completion of this course fulfills the requirements to become a Field Training Officer. Student must be in service as a public safety professional for at least three years.

    PLE 222 - Firearms Instructor Course

    4 Credits

    This course provides students with the knowledge and skills required to instruct police and peace officers in the use of firearms in law enforcement.
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Basic Course for Police Officers or Basic Course for Peace Officers, and three years of experience in a police or peace officer position that requires carrying a firearm. Sworn "active" police or peace officer. DCJS General Topics certification.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Basic Course for Police Officers or Basic Course for Peace Officers, and three years of experience in a police or peace officer position that requires carrying a firearm. Sworn "active" police or peace officer. DCJS General Topics certification.

    PLE 230 - Contemporary Issues in Public Safety I

    .5 Credits

    This contemporary issues course provides the opportunity for public safety professionals to intensively confront the operational, administrative, leadership, and training issues of the day in the time compressed decision making environment of public safety agencies. A lecturer/facilitator will present the issue to be explored, analyze it, and then facilitate an exchange among the registrants on how the public safety community should respond. Some examples of issues to be confronted are increasing homicide rates, community notification on crime patterns and criminals, bias crime, and high speed pursuits, among others. At the end of the course, each registrant will author a position paper on the issue and her/his recommended public safety response. Due to the changing nature of the subject matter, this course may be taken more than once. Student must be in service as a public safety professional.

    PLE 231 - Contemporary Issues in Public Safety II

    1 Credit

    This contemporary issues course provides the opportunity for public safety professionals to intensively confront the operational, administrative, leadership, and training issues of the day in the time compressed decision making environment of public safety agencies. A lecturer/facilitator will present the issue to be explored, analyze it, and then facilitate an exchange among the registrants on how the public safety community should respond. Some examples of issues to be confronted are increasing homicide rates, community notification on crime patterns and criminals, bias crime, and high speed pursuits, among others. At the end of the course, each registrant will author a position paper on the issue and her/his recommended public safety response. Due to the changing nature of the subject matter, this course may be taken more than once. Student must be in service as a public safety professional.

    PLE 233 - Crime Scene and Evidence Handling

    4.5 Credits

    This course is the entry level offering for evidence technicians and specialists on the scientific techniques for processing a crime scene. Topic areas to be explored include constitutional and statutory law on search, seizure and admissibility of evidence, determining the expanse of the crime scene(s), the conduct of confined space and open field searches, types of searches, evidence collection techniques, evidence control, packaging and documentation, and court room testimony. Special attention will be placed on explosion, detonation and arson processing. Must currently be a police officer.

    Prerequisite: PLE 152.

    PLE 234 - Defensive Tactics Instructor

    4 Credits

    This course is designed to develop specialized content knowledge for New York State Bureau of Municipal Police certified General Topics Instructors. The course focuses on the continuum of force which law enforcement officers may employ in restraining and arresting an individual. Topics to be explored include the law and policy on the use of force, the defensive tactics system, stimulus response training, levels of force/restraint on the continuum, verbal and physical techniques and safety considerations and techniques. The course will include both instructional and performance components. Upon successful completion of the course, participants will receive specialty certification by the New York State Bureau of Municipal Police as a Defensive Tactics Instructor. Must be a Peace or Police Officer.

    Prerequisite: PLE 220.

    PLE 244 - Advanced Firearms Instructor

    2 Credits

    This course is designed to develop advanced instructional techniques for New York State Bureau of Municipal Police certified Firearms Instructors. Topics to be explored include weapon retention, response techniques to deficient shooters, safe operation of range facilities, instruction on and uses of special weapons, instruction on low light shooting, Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards for range operations, and legal obligations of range operators.

    Prerequisite: PLE 222.

    PLE 265 - Supervisor Enhanced In-Service

    .5-1 Credit

    This course provides 7-15 hours of annual required common core instruction on operational, supervisory and management theories and techniques for the public safety supervisor. This instruction will be encompassed from the Bureau of Municipal Police, Public Safety Office general subject areas for police in-service education. The subject areas will include: legal issues, police and the public, police procedures, mechanics of arrest, and educational electives. A lecturer/facilitator will present this instructional. At the conclusion of this course, the participant will be given an authentic assessment consisting of one or more of the following: written test, oral exam, oral reporting, practical performance exam of skills learned, or peer assessment. Due to the annual requirement of instruction, this course may be taken more than once. Must be in service as a Supervisor for Public Safety Professionals.

    PLE 270 - Contemporary Issues in Public Safety

    Variable Credit

    This contemporary issues course provides the opportunity for public safety professionals to intensively confront the operational, administrative, leadership and training issues of the day in the time compressed, decision making environment of public safety agencies. A lecturer/facilitator will present the issue to be explored, analyze it and then facilitate an exchange among the registrants on how the public safety community should respond. Some examples of issues to be confronted are increasing homicide are increasing homicide rates, community notification on crime patterns and criminals, bias crime, and high speed pursuits, among others. At the end of the course, each registrant will author a position paper on the issue and her/his recommended public safety response. Due to the changing nature of the subject matter, this course may be taken more than once. Student must be in service as a public safety professional.

    PLE 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

PLS - Paralegal Studies

    PLS 250 - Paralegal Communication Skills

    1 Credit

    This course provides basic communications skills needed by paralegals as perceived by both paralegals and the lawyers with whom they work. These skills include: listening, writing, speaking, conflict resolution, assertiveness, and nonverbal communications. Listening activities include: exercises which develop active listening strategies and notetaking. Writing activities include exercises to construct clear sentences, compose letters which obtain and transmit information, and summarize facts. Speaking activities include exercises to fully, clearly and effectively obtain and relay information. Nonverbal activities include strategies and tactics for effective law office communications. Students learn to identify their own communication styles and methods for improving their communication effectiveness. Must be matriculated into the Paralegal Studies Certificate Program.

    Prerequisite(s): PLS 260 or permission of program director.

    PLS 260 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies

    2 Credits

    Introduces the student to the paralegal profession and the common core of legal knowledge and skills that all paralegals should possess. Areas covered include: what paralegals do, a history of the profession, the significance of paralegal professional associations, personal attributes of the professional paralegal, employment of paralegals, paralegal specialized practice areas, paralegal compensation, the organizational structure of law firms, the regulation of legal professionals, unauthorized practice of law, and contemporary issues. Aspects of these topics are also included in subsequent courses. This course also introduces students to sources of American law, the court system, and alternative dispute resolution. Emphasis is on the paralegal's participation on the legal team.

    PLS 263 - Contract Law for Paralegals

    2 Credits

    Provides paralegal students with the basic theory of contract law, sample contracts from a variety of specialized practice areas, supplemental cases, and the opportunity to draft simple contracts. Included in the course are the basic contract requirements, contract provisions in selected specialized practice areas, the Statute of Frauds, and the Uniform Commercial Code. Students learn key contract terms, sample clauses, perform exercises, draft simple contracts, and conduct case analysis. Since the substantive area of contract law underlies many other specialty areas it is important that the well trained paralegal can analyze the needs of the client both short term and long range. This class will also explore how paralegals can apply the elements of reasoning and thereby increase the effectiveness of the legal entity. In this area this course will draw on concepts from the domains of critical thinking and analysis, total quality management and closely allied philosophy of continuing quality improvement, communications which build trust, conflict management and resolution, and decision making.

    Prerequisite: PLS 260

    PLS 264 - Administrative Law

    1 Credit

    This course introduces students to a rapidly expanding area of law. Students learn how and why administrative agencies are created, how they establish rules, and how they investigate and enforce those rules. Students will also learn how to assist clients to obtain benefits under some administrative agencies, how to fill out administrative agencies' forms, and how to challenge administrative agencies' decisions. Some administrative agencies, Social Security Administration, for one, permits paralegals to represent clients. Federal and New York administrative agencies are covered.

    PLS 265 - Fact-Finding Research

    1 Credit

    Provides students with strategies for fact-finding and investigation. Included in the courses are interviewing techniques for gathering information from clients, witnesses and agencies. Also included are investigative techniques for determining what information is needed and finding, organizing, verifying and documenting the information. Fact-finding research is an important aspect of paralegal responsibility. Students will learn to develop critical thinking skills, communicate effectively while in pursuit of information, and apply good judgement and common sense when encountering ethical problems.

    PLS 266 - Legal Research and Writing

    3 Credits

    Students develop legal research and analysis strategies through lecture, library exercises, and computerized research. Understanding the structure of the sources of law and utilizing critical thinking skills equip students to undertake legal research systematically. Students use federal and New York State CD-ROM and law books consisting of substantive and procedural documents, digests, reporters, statutes, rules and regulations of administrative agencies, and the Internet to research databases and communicate with others. Writing exercises involve analyzing, summarizing, and synthesizing research in a clear, concise, accurate and timely manner based upon the procedural requirements of the law.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of PLS 260, or permission of program director.

    PLS 267 - Litigation and the Federal and NYS Procedural Laws

    3 Credits

    Provides students with the knowledge, skills and practice performing the duties of the litigation paralegal. Through the use of case simulations, students learn to gather, review, index and summarize documents, and to work with the lawyer and legal secretary to manage case files through pretrial, trial and post-trial stages. Guided by federal and New York State procedural laws, and rules and regulations of New York and local court rules, students learn to draft common litigation correspondence, notices and legal documents. These include summons, complaints, answers, motions, affidavits, subpoena, discovery documents, and orders. Students are introduced to the tools used in litigation: manual and computer-based document control systems, deposition exhibitions cross-reference mechanisms, trial notebook categories, trial witness coordinating forms, and trial exhibits tracking forms. Litigation tasks in this course form the foundation for paralegal litigation responsibilities in family law, real estate, debtor/creditor law, criminal law, and personal injury law. Also introduced in this course are automated litigation support systems and an overview of the potential areas for paralegal participation on document production.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of PLS 260.

    PLS 268 - Personal Injury Law

    2 Credits

    Students learn the basic principles of personal injury law, the application of the Civil Practice Law and Rules (CPLR) to personal injury cases, New York automobile insurance law, worker's compensation, and procedures for suing municipalities and the State of New York. Students learn to manage document production and organization, including investigating, researching, and drafting the most commonly used forms in personal injury resulting from negligence, vehicular negligence, medical malpractice, strict liability, and product liability.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of PLS 266, or permission of program director.

    PLS 269 - Domestic Relations and Family Law

    2 Credits

    Introduces students to the paralegal responsibilities in family law practice including New York Domestic Relations Law and the Family Court Act as they govern family situations. Students will draft a complaint and answer for a contested matrimonial action, and other documents related to contemporary family matters.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of PLS 266 and 267, or permission of program director.

    PLS 270 - Debtor/Creditor Law

    3 Credits

    This course introduces students to debtor/creditor law. Students learn collection procedures, including, but not limited to, "skip-tracing," enforcing money judgments, effecting special rights of creditors, mortgage foreclosure and mechanics' liens, working with prejudgement or provisional remedies, and guaranteeing debtors' procedural due process rights. Students also learn two forms of bankruptcy relief - liquidation and rehabilitation. Emphasis on the law regarding, and performing selected tasks and responsibilities listed in "MCC'S Survey Results for Paralegal Competency Expectations" is specialized practice areas relating to debtor/creditor law, under the supervision of an attorney.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of PLS 266 and PLS 267, or permission of program director.

    PLS 271 - Corporate Law and Business Organizations

    2 Credits

    Introduces students to corporate law and the formation, operation, dissolution, and buying and selling various kinds of business organizations. Subjects include sole proprietorships, corporations, partnerships, professional associations, franchises, and the law of agency and employment agreements. Also included in this course is a section on business closings. The role of the paralegal in a corporate law department or in the corporate section of a law firm is to implement the decisions of the attorneys and clients. Once the business evaluation has occurred, the paralegal is responsible for the details of drafting, filing and assembling the relevant documents and making the deal happen on a predetermined timetable.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of PLS 266 and PLS 267, or permission of program director.

    PLS 272 - Real Estate Law

    2 Credits

    Introduces students to real estate law and practice. Topics of study include: property rights, principles of land ownership, sale, financing and conveyance, contracts, mortgage loans, mortgages, deeds, recording, settlement concepts, condominiums, leasing, landlord/tenant summary proceedings, and other property concepts. Students focus on managing multiple participant relationships, and opening, controlling, and closing the real estate file. Emphasis on the law regarding, and performing selected tasks and responsibilities listed in the "MCC's Survey Results for Paralegal Competency Expectations" in the specialized practice area of real estate under the supervision of an attorney.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of PLS 260 and PLS 266, or permission of program director.

    PLS 273 - Computer Support Systems

    1 Credit

    Provides students with the tools to manage litigation. Students learn to determine the criteria for selecting litigation management systems by comparing software demo disks, critiquing systems used in local litigation practices, and bearing in mind the wisdom gained from guest experts. The systems include filing, indexing, and organizing cases involving large numbers of documents, manual and automated litigation support systems, litigation plan and budget worksheets, and court and responsible attorney schedules. Emphasis is on systems and teamwork with the attorney, the law office administrator, computer specialists, other paralegals, and the legal secretary to assure continuing quality effort to manage litigation cases. THIS COURSE FOR PARALEGAL STUDENTS ONLY.

    Prerequisites: PLS 260 or permission of program director.

    PLS 274 - Estate Planning, Estates and Trust Administration

    3 Credits

    Introduces students to the concepts and forms necessary for estate planning and estate and trust administration. Students learn to assist the attorney with a variety of tasks, from opening the estate and appointment of a fiduciary to filing of final account and distribution of assets. Forms, checklists, and deadlines for Federal and New York income, estate, and gift taxation laws and regulations are emphasized. Probate practice is an important area of employability of paralegals. A basic foundation in New York Estates, Powers, and Trusts Law, Uniform Court Rules, and the procedures and forms used in Surrogate's Court Practice will increase a paralegal's value to the firm.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of PLS 260 and PLS 266, or permission of program director.

    PLS 275 - Law Practice Management

    1 Credit

    Covers the fundamentals of law office organization and management. Subjects covered include basic principles and structure of the management of legal services, personnel and human resources, marketing issues, and management information systems topics such as timekeeping, accounting, administration, and cost-benefit analysis of specialized practice areas of the law. Emphasis on efficient and effective law practice organization through the optimum use of human and technical resources.

    Prerequisites: PLS 260 or permission of program director.

    PLS 276 - Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility

    1 Credit

    Builds upon ethical situations and professional responsibilities. Students are provided with additional frameworks with which to undertake ethical analysis. Students will study paralegals as an emerging professional and efforts directed toward paralegal credentialing and regulation. Included are discussions concerning conclusions reached in the final report of the NYS Bar Association on Non-Lawyer Practice, and recommendations contained in the final report of the American Bar Association Non-Lawyer Activity in Law-Related Situations. Other areas covered include employment discrimination, substance abuse and continuing education requirements.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of PLS 260, or permission of program director.

    PLS 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

    PLS 299 - Paralegal Internship

    3 Credits

    Designed to give students the opportunity to apply their formal education to actual work situations. The student intern will work either under the direct supervision of a practicing attorney or under the direct supervision of a practicing paralegal while under the overall supervision of a practicing attorney. Students must work a minimum of 75 hours in a law office or other legal entity and 7.5 of these hours must be for a not-for-profit legal entity. Additionally the students must meet with the internship faculty member 15 hours to receive three semester credit hours. The significance of student interns adhering to flawless ethical standards, maintaining confidentiality, being meticulous and reliable cannot be overemphasized.

    Prerequisite: Successful completion of 6 credit hours in the PLS program.

POS - Political Science

    POS 101 - Introduction to Political Science

    3 Credits

    This course provides an overview of several of the basic areas of study in the discipline of political science. This course will focus on the nature of both domestic and global politics. This includes an investigation of the impact of politics in our everyday lives; the nature and function of politics and government; modern ideologies; political participation; the branches of government; and an analysis of the global system.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    POS 102 - American National Government

    3 Credits

    This course is a study of the American political system, its constitutional foundation, national institutions and contemporary issues. This course examines how the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, in addition to other national institutions, interact with each other and citizens.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-SS in addition to the other listed category below.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    POS 203 - Civil Liberties and Rights in the U.S.

    3 Credits

    An examination of controversial issues in Constitutional history. This includes a focus on the decision making process of the federal court system with regards to the civil liberties and rights enumerated in the Constitution. Students will read landmark Supreme Court cases which determine both the limits and content of government powers and vital personal freedoms.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-SS in addition to the other listed category below.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-AH - American History (SAMH)

    MCC General Education: MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    POS 205 - Comparative Political Systems

    3 Credits

    This course provides an overview of analytical concepts and tools used in the study of a variety of political systems. This includes the descriptive and analytical examination of political systems generally classified as democratic, non-democratic, or undergoing transition. Particular attention is paid to government institutions and political processes, current leadership, and major public policy of those selected systems under review.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-OWC - Other World Civilizations (SOW2)

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    POS 206 - International Politics

    3 Credits

    This course critically analyzes the structure and principles of the global system. The objective of this course is to give students a fundamental understanding of contemporary international affairs through a systematic examination of those theories, concepts, and events that directly relate to the global system. Topics relating to both state and human security will be addressed. This includes war and peace, terrorism, foreign policy-making, nationalism, and those areas of security relating to the environment, health, and economy. The important function of international law and organizations, and the international political economy will also be introduced. Emphasis will be placed on the role of state and non-state actors, as well as an analysis of both important historical and current events.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-OWC

    Learning Attributes: WR

    POS 210 - Introduction to Political Thought

    3 Credits

    This course offers a survey of western political thought from classical Greece to the present. This course pays attention to the historical context out of which the political thought of Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke and others arose. Through the examination of the development of political thought, this course will grow an understanding of the nature and foundations of modern governments.

    For 2018-19, this course remains SUNY-SS in addition to the other listed category below.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-WC - Western Civilization (SWCV)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    POS 216 - Special Topics in Political Science

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to address specific topics of interest in political science. Offerings are more specific and focused than the introductory surveys. Examples of potential offerings could include The American Presidency, Comparative Public Policy, American National Security, and Urban Politics in a Comparative Perspective. Topics may change from semester to semester based on faculty and student interest. The classes will be primarily lecture and discussion based.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    POS 234 - Model United Nations

    4 Credits

    This course offers opportunities for academic, career and personal growth for those interested in international affairs and the political arena. Students will work together researching the history, culture and relevant domestic issues of the assigned country, and will learn about one of the most important international organizations in the world: the United Nations. In the process, this class will provide students with the knowledge and leadership skills (i.e., negotiating, team building, public speaking, etc.) to prepare students as delegates to the Model United Nations Conference. In contrast to standard lecture courses, students will be actively involved in team directed preparation and content delivery. Attendance at the Model United Nations Conference is mandatory.

    Prerequisite: Registration in this course is by permission only, following an application and selection process that takes place in the Fall Semester.

    Learning Attributes: WR

    MCC General Education: MCC-GLO - Global Understanding (MGLO)

    POS 290 - Independent Study

    Variable Credit

    See the Department Chairperson.

    Learning Attributes: WR

PPE - Physical Studies/Physical Education

    PPE 100 - Introduction to Sport Science

    4 Credits

    A course designed to expose the student to the components of the sport sciences, including anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, sport medicine, and sport technology as they relate to human exercise. Students will apply the integration of physical fitness principles and health components to formulate a personal wellness plan relative to their needs. This class includes both theory and practice through a lecture and laboratory experience.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    PPE 106 - Individual Sports

    3 Credits

    A course based on teaching competencies for students future use, focusing on individual sports such as tennis, golf, and racquetball. Students will learn skill development, teaching and coaching strategies, and lifetime fitness benefits.

    PPE 120 - Team Sports

    3 Credits

    A course based on teaching competencies for students future use focusing on team sports such as softball, soccer, and basketball. Students will learn skill development, class organizational principles, and coaching strategies.

    PPE 150 - Adventure Bound

    3 Credits

    A course in which the student will participate in a variety of provocative community/outdoor oriented experiences and classroom presentations. High and low project adventure ropes courses, trust and initiative games, camping and survival skills, circus acrosports, canoeing and hiking sojourns, service to populations at risk, etc., are a few of the adventure experience options from which the student will select several to participate in.

    PPE 155 - Sport Performance Coaching

    3 Credits

    Principles of metabolic training, muscle strength and endurance training, and cardiovascular training will be applied to athletic performance. Specifically the course will focus on the development of power, speed, acceleration, agility and quickness for the development of high quality sport performance. Students will design a testing scheme for sport performance, use various modalities to analyze performance, and design a personal wellness plan.

    MCC General Education: MCC-HW - Health and Wellness (MHW)

    PPE 170 - Introduction to Sport Medicine

    3 Credits

    Covers the nature, philosophy, and practice of the field of sport medicine. Prevention, emergency care, and rehabilitation as they pertain to certain athletic injuries will be the focus of the course. This course satisfies the requirements of the NYS Education Department Coaching Certification Course: Health Science Applied to Coaching.

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    PPE 175 - Philosophy and Principles of Physical Education and Athletics

    3 Credits

    Designed to expose the professional preparation student to the history and development trends of the field. Specifically, exposure to the subfields of Physical Studies will be explored. These will include, but not be limited to, Physical Education, Sport Medicine, Sport Psychology, Exercise Physiology, Motor Learning, History of Sport, Sociology of Sport, Recreation, Health Education, Adapted Physical Education, Coaching, and current issues. Special emphasis on the role of coaching as part of the education system, legal and health considerations, and local, state and national roles as they pertain to sport. This course satisfies the requirements of the NYS Education Department Coaching Certification Course: Principles, Philosophy and Organization of Athletics.

    MCC General Education: MCC-IL - Information Literacy (MIL), MCC-VE - Values and Ethics (MVE)

    PPE 179 - Lifeguarding

    2 Credits

    A full semester course to certify students in American Red Cross Lifeguarding. Students need to be strong swimmers and must be able to do the breaststroke with whip kick, sidestroke with inverted scissors, and freestyle with rotary breathing. The students must be able to tread water using egg beater kick and surface dive and retrieve a 10 pound brick. Each class warm up consists of 500-yard swim (20 lengths). This course includes CPR for the Professional Rescuer and standard first aid. At the completion of this course, the student must pass the Red Cross written and practical test for swimming. American Red Cross Administration Fee is $5.00.

    PPE 208 - Sport, Exercise and Wellness Psychology

    3 Credits

    As the demand for enhanced sport and exercise performance continues and the focus on Wellness grows, the cognitive or mental aspects within sport, activity and wellness are being exposed. Sport, Exercise and Wellness Psychology has evolved through this need. Specifically, this course will relate the application of conventional psychological areas (personality, motivation, aggression, etc.) to the arena of sport. The focus on psychological skills as applied to performance and wellness is also an essential element of this ever changing field.

    SUNY General Education: SUNY-SS - Social Sciences (SSCS)

    MCC General Education: MCC-CT - Critical Thinking (MCT), MCC-SCI - Scientific Reasoning (MSCI), MCC-SSD - Social Science and Diversity (MSSD)

    PPE 209 - Theories and Techniques of Coaching

    3 Credits

    This course is designed to examine theories and techniques in coaching through developing information, organization and management skills. Development of technical information, safety aspects and human relationships will be studied. The practicum experience brings the student to an on-site awareness and participation. This course satisfies the state guidelines for elementary and secondary coaching certification. This course satisfies the requirements of the NYS Education Department Coaching Certification Course: Theory and Technique of Coaching.