Course Descriptions

The following is a complete listing of courses offered at MCC. You can also visit our Programs of Study page for a list of course requirements necessary to complete your degree.

AAD - Applied Art and Design
ACC - Accounting
ACD - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency
AGS - Agricultural Studies
ANT - Anthropology
ARA - Arabic/Foreign Language
ART - Art
ASL - American Sign Language/Foreign Language
ATP - Automotive Technology
BIO - Biology
BUS - Business
CDL - Interdisciplinary
CE - Cooperative Education-Disney World
CE - Hospitality
CE - Office Technology
CEL - Leadership
CHE - Chemistry
CHI - Chinese/Foreign Language
CIN - Cinema Studies
CIS - Computer Information Systems
CIT - Civil and Construction Technology
CLT - Clinical Laboratory Technician
COM - Communication
COS - College Success
CPT - Computer Technology
CPT 101 - Programming in Python

4 Credits

A gentle introduction to basic programming concepts using Python. Python is a high-level, interpreted object oriented programming language with built in data structures and dynamic data typing. This results in programs that are typically much shorter than programs written in Java or C++. Python’s built in debugger allows the developer to inspect variables, set breakpoints and evaluate expressions in real-time. The underlying C and Java like structure and modularity allow for easy integration or linkage to existing programs in these languages. The combined features of Python are well suited for rapid program development leading to enhanced productivity. Practical applications of Python may be found in the prominent fields of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics. This course utilizes an electronic-classroom setting to introduce the beginner or curious programmer to Python and basic programming concepts through a series of practical hands-on exercises interlaced with the discussion material. Three class hours, two lab hours.

MTH 104 with a grade of C or better, or MCC level 8 mathematics placement.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Utilize the interactive Python environment to define and debug Python functions.
2. Design and invoke Python program modules.
3. Apply common built-in Python language functions to solve problems.
4. Utilize built-in Python language tools to debug applications.
5. Develop modular Python applications that adhere to required specifications so that they may serve as a functional component of a larger collaborative programming project.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 114 - Problem Solving and Robotics

3 Credits

This course is designed to develop and/or enhance practical problem solving skills and apply these skills to Robotics. Challenging exercises and robotics projects are designed to foster critical thinking that is particularly useful to students interested in the engineering, computational and networking disciplines. The course focuses on the analysis, design and implementation phases in developing a complete solution to a given problem. Major concepts discussed include algorithm development,number systems conversions, logic flow diagram development, and solution testing. Appropriate use of data types, conditional selection, repetitive, and iterative solutions are emphasized throughout the course. A data flow programming approach using LabView is utilized extensively throughout the course to implement and test concepts. Projects make use of the exciting and challenging Lego Mindstorms Robotics system to create real-life applications that build on the skills developed throughout the course. Two class hours, two laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: MTH 104 with a grade of C, or higher level Algebra course

Course Learning Outcomes
1. State a properly structured algorithm to a given problem.
2. Construct a logic flow diagram given an algorithm.
3. Construct a program given a logic flow diagram.
4. Describe how two asynchronous processes may be synchronized.
5. Test a programmed solution to a given problem both analytically and experimentally.
6. Describe the storage limitations of various signed and unsigned data types.
7. Design a complete solution to a given problem in Robotics.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 115 - Introduction to Networks

3 Credits

This course corresponds to the first semester of the Cisco Networking Academy Exploration track. It introduces students to the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. It uses the OSI and TCP layered models to examine the nature and roles of protocols and services at the application, network, data link, and physical layers. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for further studies in computer networking. Hands-on labs for this course use a “model Internet” to allow students to analyze real data without affecting production networks. At the end of the course, students build simple LAN topologies by applying basic principles of cabling, performing basic configurations of network devices such as routers and switches, and implementing IP addressing schemes. Two class hours, two laboratory hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain how communication works in data networks and the Internet
2. Utilize network protocol models to explain the layers of communications in data networks
3. Explain the role of protocols in data networks
4. Describe the importance of addressing and naming schemes at various layers of data networks
5. Describe the protocols and services provided by the application layer in the OSI and TCP/IP models and describe how this layer operates in various networks
6. Analyze the operations and features of transport layer protocols and services
7. Analyze the operations and feature of network layer protocols and services and explain the fundamental concepts of routing
8. Describe the operation of protocols at the OSI data link layer and explain how they support communications
9. Explain the role of physical layer protocols and services in supporting communications across data networks
10. Build a simple Ethernet network using routers and switches

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 120 - Introduction to Cybersecurity

4 Credits

Designed for students with no security experience or background, this course will cover basic terminology and concepts. Included will be the basics of computers and networking such as Internet Protocol, routing, Domain Name Service, and network devices. This course will introduce students to the basics of cryptography, security management, wireless networking, and organizational policy. Topics will include: an overview of the information security framework, network infrastructure security, security and cryptography, information security policy, and defense in depth. Other topics covered in this course include: basic security terminology and professional terms, network basics, tracert, nslookup, ipconfig, ping, DNS, DoS attacks, overview of malware, rules for avoiding viruses and vulnerabilities. Three class hours, two lab hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Classify the structures of various security frameworks.
2. Describe the role of computers and networks in a security framework.
3. Demonstrate a working knowledge of basic network software tools.
4. Identify computer system threats and evaluate their impact.
5. Discuss the effectiveness of various cryptographic techniques and their impact on security .
6. Describe the role of wireless communication in a secure environment.
7. Develop basic organizational security policies.
8. Describe how defense in depth can be used to implement security.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 125 - Physical Security

3 Credits

This course focuses on the design and implementation of network physical security policies and mechanisms. Physical security is the protection of personnel, hardware, programs, networks, and data from physical circumstances and events that could cause serious losses or damage to an enterprise, agency, or institution. This includes protection from fire, natural disasters, burglary, theft, vandalism, and terrorism. Two class hours, two lab hours.

Corequisite: CPT 120.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Develop and implement access control mechanisms.
2. Demonstrate how obstacles can be placed in the way of potential attackers.
3. Explain how sites can be hardened against accidents and environmental disasters.
4. Develop strategies for surveillance and notification systems.
5. Develop physical security methods that can be used to apprehend attackers.
6. Develop strategies to recover quickly from accidents, fires, or natural disasters.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 210 - Operating Systems and Peripherals

3 Credits

Fundamental multitasking/multi-user operating system concepts, as applicable to modern day computer systems, are studied. Major topics include priority boosting, priority and round robin scheduling, virtual memory management, paging, mapping, swapping, and process management. Applications that interface to the outside world via the PC's external I/O ports are examined in the laboratory. Emphasis is placed on developing simple "device drivers" using a combination of low and high level language tools. Two class hours, two laboratory hours.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in CIS 200, CSC 101 or CPT 101.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify and describe the functions of the primary components, that constitute a state of the art multiprogramming/multitasking operating system and it's environment.
2. Utilize diagnostic software to test and trouble-shoot hardware interfaces and communications between a peripheral device and the host computer system.
3. Design and implement a well-documented peripheral device driver and host application utilizing a common programming language.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 211 - Android App Design for Mobile Devices

3 Credits

An introduction to the design and implementation of mobile applications using the Android computing platform. Students will utilize standard software development techniques, including the use of an integrated development environment and software development kits, to build mobile applications. The applications will include capture and processing of data from the integrated sensors found in a typical mobile device. Three class hours.

Prerequisite(s): CSC 101 or CPT 101 or CIS 101

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Distinguish between various versions of mobile computing platforms.
2. Apply techniques and strategies pertaining to the software development life cycle.
3. Develop specifications for mobile applications utilizing platform-specific functionality.
4. Devise methods to capture and process data from physical sensors.
5. Experiment with user interface designs to represent sensor data as meaningful information.
6. Produce fully functional mobile applications.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 212 - Wireless and Remote Sensor Technology

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to concepts employed in the wireless acquisition of data from remote sensors found on airborne devices such as aircraft, spacecrafts, and satellites as well as from sensors integrated into common commercially available medical devices, tablets and smartphones. The use of remote sensors involves the acquisition of information on an object, phenomenon or an environment with minimum physical contact. In practice this is achieved by acquiring information from sensors that are responsive to environmental elements, which may be atmospheric (air pressure, vibration, humidity) or electromagnetic radiation that may be in the form of invisible (heat) or visible radiation. Students will explore various applications of sensors in a laboratory setting, apply their knowledge of digital electronics, networking and programming and gain experience integrating commercially available electro-optical, magnetic and environmental sensors into a practical wireless application. Two class hours, two lab hours.

Prerequisite(s): MTH 165, ENR 157, CSC 202 all with a grade of C or better.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Contrast the various wireless communication devices and protocols available to researchers for remote data acquisition.
2. Summarize the considerations employed to interface an analog device to a wireless digital transceiver.
3. Explain the interrelationship between aperture size, resolution, and signal to noise.
4. Use basic formulas and transforms to scale and respectively calibrate data acquired from various sensors.
5. Synthesize component data sheets, product specifications and performance parameters to arrive at a calculated result for a given integrated application.
6. Use commercially available software tools to program, control, communicate with and acquire data from sensors deployed on a remote device.
7. Use an application to analyze and characterize the quality of digital data in terms of signal resolution, noise content, and dynamic range.
8. Describe techniques that may be employed to reduce noise and increase the dynamic range of various sensors.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 213 - Computer Systems Design Lab

1 Credit

Students will work in teams to solve an application and/or design problem selected from an intercollegiate design challenge or a student proposal approved by the instructor. The students will design and build a working prototype, create a design report, and make an oral presentation. Each student will be required to maintain a weekly ledger in the form of a lab book that details work performed and progress that is periodically reviewed and graded by the instructor. Three laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: CSC 202

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Apply knowledge learned in previous computer courses to propose a design solution to a given set of requirements.
2. Construct a working application prototype.
3. Evaluate the prototype’s design performance and document revisions as determined to be necessary.
4. Produce a detailed report that specifically highlights each team member’s contribution.
5. Compose an oral presentation of the design.

Course Offered Spring only

CPT 215 - Routing Fundamentals

3 Credits

This course corresponds to the second semester of the Cisco Networking Academy Exploration track. It describes the architecture, components, and operation of routers, and explains the principles of routing and routing protocols. Students analyze, configure, verify, and troubleshoot the primary routing protocols RIPv1, RIPv2, EIGRP, and OSPF. By the end of this course, students will be able to recognize and correct common routing issues and problems. Two class hours, two laboratory hours.

Prerequisites: CPT 115 with a grade of C or better.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Characterize various networking technologies with respect to established layered network models.
2. Utilize tools such as time domain plots, frequency domain plots, and constellation diagrams to describe and distingush between signaling systems.
3. Correlate networks' data link features with practical applications of flow control, error control, and shared access to media.
4. Participate in the design and configuration of internetworks by interpreting problems and subsequently experimenting with and evaluating solutions.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 216 - Advanced Networking Concepts

3 Credits

This course focuses on securing local and wide area networks from the network administrator and an outside point of view. With successful completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of how outsiders attack networks and how to prevent these attacks from being successful. Students will also have a thorough understanding of current technologies that run over LANs and WANs and demand robust security. These technologies will be covered in depth throughout this course. Two class hours, two laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: CPT 215 with a grade of C or better.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe basic security tactics, threats, and tools.
2. Explain the threat level represented by the various attacks and design the appropriate level of response to them.
3. Demonstrate the operation of authentication services
4. Demonstrate the operation of port-based authentication and its component parts.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 217 - LAN Switching

3 Credits

This course corresponds to the third semester of the Cisco Networking Academy Exploration track and provides a comprehensive, theoretical, and practical approach to learning the technologies and protocols needed to design and implement a converged switched network. Students learn about the hierarchical network design model and how to select devices for each layer. The course explains how to configure a switch for basic functionality and how to implement Virtual LANs (VLAN), VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP), and Inter-VLAN routing in a converged network. The different implementations of Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) in a converged network are presented, and students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to implement a wireless local-area network (WLAN) in a small-to-medium network. Two class hours, two laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: CPT 215

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Utilize standard troubleshooting skills to identify and correct common network problems at layers 1, 2, 3, and 7 using a layered model approach
2. Explain the technology and media access control method for Ethernet networks
3. Explain basic switching concepts and the operation of managed switches
4. Perform and verify initial switch configuration tasks including remote access management tools
5. Describe enhanced switching technologies such as VLANs, VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP), Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP), Per-VLAN Spanning Tree Protocol (PVSTP), and IEEE 802.1q
6. Describe how VLANs create logically separate networks and how routing occurs between them
7. Configure, verify, and troubleshoot VLANs, trunking on managed switches, interVLAN routing, VTP, and RSTP
8. Identify, prescribe, and resolve common switched network media issues, configuration issues, autonegotiation, and switch hardware failures
9. Identify and describe the purpose of the components in a small wireless network, such as Service Set Identification (SSID), Basic Service Set (BSS), and Extended Service Set (ESS)
10. Identify basic configuration parameters on a wireless network to ensure that devices connect to the correct access points

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 218 - WAN Systems

3 Credits

This course corresponds to the fourth semester of the Cisco Networking Academy Exploration track. It explores the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in enterprise networks. The course uses the Cisco Network Architecture to introduce integrated network services and explains how to select the appropriate devices and technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to implement and configure common data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of traffic, access control, and addressing services. Finally, students learn how to detect, troubleshoot, and correct common enterprise network implementation issues. Two class hours, two laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: CPT 217

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe the impact of Voice Over IP and Video Over IP applications on a network
2. Implement basic switch security measures such as port security, trunk access, and management VLANs
3. Describe current network security threats and explain how to implement a comprehensive security policy to mitigate common threats to network devices, hosts, and applications
4. Describe the functions of common security appliances and applications
5. Describe the purpose and types of access control lists (ACLs)
6. Configure and apply ACLs based on network filtering requirements
7. Configure and apply an ACLs to limit Telnet and SSH access to the router using the Security Device
8. Describe different methods for connecting to a WAN
9. Configure and verify a Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) connection between routers
10. Configure and verify Frame Relay on routers

Course Offered Spring only

CPT 220 - Applied Computer Security Concepts

4 Credits

This course would provide students with the skills and knowledge needed to secure organizational resources. Topics covered include: a review of networking protocols, IOS and router filters, physical security, information assurance, computer security policies, contingency planning, business impact analysis, password management, information warfare, intrusion detection, honey pots, attack vectors, firewalls and perimeters, risk assessment and auditing, cryptography and steganography, PGP, wireless, operational security, permissions and user rights, service patches, securing network services, security baseline analyzers, Linux, and virtual machines. Three class hours, two laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: CPT 120 or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate how to physically secure a computer network.
2. Apply data packet filters to secure network edge devices.
3. Develop and implement security policies for risk management, password management, and user rights and permissions.
4. Appraise the impact of malware attack vectors on network security.
5. Create countermeasures to mitigate network attacks.
6. Apply security protocols to secure network services.
7. Demonstrate the use of cryptography and steganography to ensure secure data transmission.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 225 - Network Perimeter Security

4 Credits

This course focuses on the design and implementation of network perimeter security. Topics include: threat vectors, encapsulation at OSI layers 2, 3, 4, and 5, packet decoding, static filters, stateful filters, stateful inspection, intrusion detection and prevention, Network Address Translation (NAT), Access Control Lists (ACLs), Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), proxies, border routers, firewall rule bases, web application and database firewalls, securing the OS and services, firewall assessment, vulnerability assessment, baseline audits, forensics, logging, encryption, authentication, VPNs, wireless, network access control, and security tools. Three class hours, two laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: CPT 120

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Describe how stateful firewalls, proxy firewalls, security policies, and routers are used to implement network security.
2. Configure Virtual Private Networks.
3. Describe how intrusion detection can be used for network defense.
4. Configure network components to implement host hardening and host defense.
5. Describe how intrusion prevention systems can be used for network defense.
6. Implement and appraise various security perimeter designs.
7. Employ subnets and security zones to secure a network.
8. Implement wireless network security.
9. Analyze network security logs.
10. Explain the importance of defense in depth for network security.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CPT 290 - Independent Study

Variable Credit

See the Department Chairperson.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

CRC - Computer Related Curricula
CRJ - Criminal Justice
CSC - Computer Science
DAS - Dental Assisting
DEN - Dental Hygiene
EBL - Experience Based Learning
ECE - Education and Early Care
ECO - Economics
EDU - Education
ELT - Electrical Engineering Technology/Electronics
EMS - Emergency Medical Services
ENG - English Literature
ENG - English Writing
ENR - Engineering Science
ESL - English For Speakers Of Other Languages (ESOL)
FPT - Fire Protection Technology
FRE - French/Foreign Language
FSA - Food Service Administration
GEG - Geography
GEO - Geology
GER - German/Foreign Language
GLF - Golf Management
HBR - Hebrew/Foreign Language
HED - Health Education
HEG - Health Education Global
HIM - Health Information Technology
HIS - History
HMN - Humanities
HON - Honors Studies
HPR - Health Professions
HSM - Homeland Security Administration
HSP - Hospitality
HTL - Hotel Technology
HUM - Human Services
HVA - Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning
IDE - Interior Design
ITA - Italian/Foreign Language
JPN - Japanese/Foreign Language
LAW - Law
LDS - Leadership
MAR - Marketing
MET - Mechanical Technology
MFG - Manufacturing Technology: Automation / Robotics
MTH - Mathematics
MUS - Music
NUR - Nursing
OFT - Office Technology
OPT - Optical Systems Technology
PE - Physical Education--Coed
PEC - Physical Education--Coed
PEJ - Physical Education-Criminal Justice
PEM - Physical Education--Men
PEW - Physical Education-Women
PHL - Philosophy
PHO - Photography
PHY - Physics
PLE - Police: Law Enforcement
PLS - Paralegal Studies
POR - Portuguese/Foreign Language
POS - Political Science
PPE - Physical Studies/Physical Education
PSC - Public Safety Communications
PSC - Public Safety Training
PST - Public Safety Training
PSY - Psychology
REA - Reading
SBS - Honors Studies
SBS - Social & Behavioral Sciences
SCI - Science
SCR - Computer Security
SGT - Surgical Technology
SMT - Sports Management
SOC - Sociology
SPA - Spanish/Foreign Language
SPC - Speech Communication
STT - Solar Thermal Technology
SUS - Sustainability Studies
SVL - Service Learning
TAM - Tooling and Machining
TEK - Technology
THE - Theatre
TOY - Toyota
TRS - Transitional Studies
TVL - Travel And Tourism
XRT - Radiologic Technology