Course Descriptions

The following is a complete listing of courses offered at MCC. You can also visit our Programs of Study page for a list of course requirements necessary to complete your degree.

AAD - Applied Art and Design
ACC - Accounting
ACD - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency
AGS - Agricultural Studies
ANT - Anthropology
ARA - Arabic/Foreign Language
ART - Art
ASL - American Sign Language/Foreign Language
ATP - Automotive Technology
BIO - Biology
BUS - Business
CDL - Interdisciplinary
CE - Cooperative Education-Disney World
CE - Hospitality
CE - Office Technology
CEL - Leadership
CHE - Chemistry
CHI - Chinese/Foreign Language
CIN - Cinema Studies
CIS - Computer Information Systems
CIT - Civil and Construction Technology
CLT - Clinical Laboratory Technician
COM - Communication
COS - College Success
CPT - Computer Technology
CRC - Computer Related Curricula
CRJ - Criminal Justice
CSC - Computer Science
DAS - Dental Assisting
DEN - Dental Hygiene
EBL - Experience Based Learning
ECE - Education and Early Care
ECO - Economics
ECO 101 - Introduction to Economics

3 Credits

A one-semester, non-technical course designed to answer questions about the economy. How and why does our market economic system work? Why is there inflation and/or unemployment and what are their remedies? How does the government influence your future economic well-being? Where are we on the business cycle? What are the causes and consequences of our growing national debt? What is the Federal Reserve and how does its monetary policy affect you and the interest rate? How is the emerging global interdependence of countries changing our economy and your life? This course will help you understand the economic environment in which you live, work, and vote. This course is not recommended as a Social Science Elective for students enrolled in A.S. programs in Business Administration or International Business. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Compare and contrast the elements of Macroeconomics and Microeconomics.
2. Predict various economic outcomes by constructing and manipulating supply and demand curves.
3. Differentiate between the various types of unemployment and list their causes and remedies.
4. Compare and contrast Demand Pull and Cost Push Inflation in terms of their effects on the economy (such as interest rates, purchasing power and income redistribution).
5. Distinguish between Fiscal and Monetary Policy and the tools that each uses in order to impact inflationary and recessionary situations in the economy.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

ECO 103 - Personal Money Management

3 Credits

A very practical course which teaches you how to create a financial plan to realize goals, such as home ownership and early retirement. By taking this course, you will learn how to avoid credit trouble, save money on automobile purchases, and buy a desirable home. You will also learn how to protect yourself from financial disaster through the purchase of the lowest cost and safest insurance policies. Finally, you will learn how to make your money grow by investing in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. Using the techniques you learn in this class will allow you to plan, save, and spend wisely so you and your family will enjoy a better way of life. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Use time-value-of-money tables to calculate the future cost of a long term financial goal.
2. Use time-value-of-money tables to calculate the annual savings required to reach a financial goal.
3. Construct tools, such as personal net worth statements, cash flow statements, or budgets, to assess one’s personal financial condition.
4. Identify strategies to reduce personal income taxes.
5. Calculate the costs of using credit.
6. Identify signs of credit overuse.
7. Describe effective planned-buying strategies used when purchasing major assets, such as autos or homes.
8. Explain how insurance protects personal assets and income.
9. Identify appropriate investment vehicles related to one’s financial goals based on criteria such as time frame, investment risks, expected return, or various mutual fund characteristics.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

ECO 110 - Personal Investing

3 Credits

This course is about making money. You will learn the "ins" and "outs" of investing in stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. You will simulate investing using current market data to choose the best stock and bond mutual funds. Learn to use tax advantaged methods of investing, such as 401K plans and IRA's to help your money grow. Additional investment choices will be examined, such as real estate, options, and collectibles. Upon completion of the course, you will have an understanding of Wall Street, the Dow Jones, and various financial markets. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Understand and demonstrate knowledge of the workings of Wall Street, the New York Stock Exchange and buying/selling individual stocks.
2. Develop screens to choose a mutual fund based on individual criteria.
3. Articulate the basics of investing in bonds and bond funds.
4. Calculate the costs of investing in real estate and choosing the best location.
5. Utilize the knowledge of ETF to compare and contrast it with mutual funds.
6. Differentiate the aspects of various retirement accounts including 401K, SEP and IRA's.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

ECO 111 - Principles of Microeconomics

3 Credits

This course will help you gain insight and understanding into events that are constantly going on around you. You will learn how to think like an economist by analyzing everything critically, comparing costs and benefits, even in issues normally considered outside the scope of economics. You will use economic reasoning to decide whether you will read your book of economics, whether you will attend class, whom you will marry, and what kind of work you will likely go into after you graduate. The skill you will need to start thinking like an economist will be acquired from topics covered, such as opportunity cost, scarcity and choices, demand, supply, production and costs, the market system, elasticity, market structures, etc. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS)

Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra or MTH 104.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Define, interpret, and analyze economic data using the concepts of Opportunity costs and the Production Possibility Frontier.
2. Construct and manipulate the Supply and Demand model to analyze, predict, and evaluate economic activity.
3. Define and calculate Elasticity in order to analyze, integrate and evaluate economic data.
4. Calculate and diagram the cost of production data so that they can estimate, differentiate, predict and discuss the behavior of the producer.
5. Define and diagram the Theory of Competition in order to compute, predict, organize and evaluate economic data using this model.
6. Define and diagram the Theory of Monopoly in order to compute, predict, organize and evaluate economic data using this model.
7. Define and diagram the Theory of Imperfect Competition in order to compute, predict, organize and evaluate economic data using this model.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

ECO 112 - Principles of Macroeconomics

3 Credits

Course focuses on the on-going concerns of the United States economy, unemployment, inflation, and gross domestic product. International economics is woven throughout the course helping to explain the impact of the globalization of our economy and your economic future. To illustrate and aid the student's understanding of these concepts and topics, the course makes extensive use of current events. Students will gain a full view of the current United States economic environment and macroeconomic theory. This course explores macroeconomic models and approaches, such as national income accounting, circular flow, aggregate demand and aggregate supply, and fiscal and monetary policy. Three class hours. (SUNY-SS)

Prerequisite: ECO 111 with a grade of C or higher.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Construct and manipulate the Aggregate Supply and Aggregate Demand model in order to predict and demonstrate an understanding of various economic situations and shocks.
2. Compute Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as a measurement of growth in the economy using National Income Accounting and demonstrate an understanding of GDP’s importance in determining economic policy.
3. Construct a business cycle and be able to forecast potential changes that could occur in the cycle.
4. Measure unemployment, differentiate between various types of unemployment and apply remedies to address unemployment.
5. Demonstrate an understanding of the two separate causes of inflation and how inflation affects various components of the economy such as interest rates, purchasing power and redistribution of income.
6. Demonstrate an understanding of Fiscal Policy and manipulate the tools of Fiscal Policy, taxes and government spending, to remedy an inflationary or recessionary situation in the economy.
7. Demonstrate an understanding of Monetary Policy and be able to manipulate the Federal Reserve’s three tools to recommend a remedy for an inflation or recession in the economy.
8. Distinguish the differences between Keynesian and Classical economic theories and how, when these theories are applied to Fiscal and Monetary Policy in an inflation or recession, they produce different policy applications that impact the economy differently.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

ECO 290 - Independent Study

Variable Credit

See the Department Chairperson.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

EDU - Education
ELT - Electrical Engineering Technology/Electronics
EMS - Emergency Medical Services
ENG - English Literature
ENG - English Writing
ENR - Engineering Science
ESL - English For Speakers Of Other Languages (ESOL)
FPT - Fire Protection Technology
FRE - French/Foreign Language
FSA - Food Service Administration
GEG - Geography
GEO - Geology
GER - German/Foreign Language
GLF - Golf Management
HBR - Hebrew/Foreign Language
HED - Health Education
HEG - Health Education Global
HIM - Health Information Technology
HIS - History
HMN - Humanities
HON - Honors Studies
HPR - Health Professions
HSM - Homeland Security Administration
HSP - Hospitality
HTL - Hotel Technology
HUM - Human Services
HVA - Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning
IDE - Interior Design
ITA - Italian/Foreign Language
JPN - Japanese/Foreign Language
LAW - Law
LDS - Leadership
MAR - Marketing
MET - Mechanical Technology
MFG - Manufacturing Technology: Automation / Robotics
MTH - Mathematics
MUS - Music
NUR - Nursing
OFT - Office Technology
OPT - Optical Systems Technology
PE - Physical Education--Coed
PEC - Physical Education--Coed
PEJ - Physical Education-Criminal Justice
PEM - Physical Education--Men
PEW - Physical Education-Women
PHL - Philosophy
PHO - Photography
PHY - Physics
PLE - Police: Law Enforcement
PLS - Paralegal Studies
POR - Portuguese/Foreign Language
POS - Political Science
PPE - Physical Studies/Physical Education
PSC - Public Safety Communications
PSC - Public Safety Training
PST - Public Safety Training
PSY - Psychology
REA - Reading
SBS - Honors Studies
SBS - Social & Behavioral Sciences
SCI - Science
SCR - Computer Security
SGT - Surgical Technology
SMT - Sports Management
SOC - Sociology
SPA - Spanish/Foreign Language
SPC - Speech Communication
STT - Solar Thermal Technology
SUS - Sustainability Studies
SVL - Service Learning
TAM - Tooling and Machining
TEK - Technology
THE - Theatre
TOY - Toyota
TRS - Transitional Studies
TVL - Travel And Tourism
XRT - Radiologic Technology