Course Descriptions

The following is a complete listing of courses offered at MCC. You can also visit our Programs of Study page for a list of course requirements necessary to complete your degree.

AAD - Applied Art and Design
ACC - Accounting
ACD - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency
AGS - Agricultural Studies
ANT - Anthropology
ARA - Arabic/Foreign Language
ART - Art
ASL - American Sign Language/Foreign Language
ATP - Automotive Technology
BIO - Biology
BUS - Business
CDL - Interdisciplinary
CE - Cooperative Education-Disney World
CE - Hospitality
CE - Office Technology
CEL - Leadership
CHE - Chemistry
CHI - Chinese/Foreign Language
CIN - Cinema Studies
CIS - Computer Information Systems
CIT - Civil and Construction Technology
CLT - Clinical Laboratory Technician
COM - Communication
COS - College Success
CPT - Computer Technology
CRC - Computer Related Curricula
CRJ - Criminal Justice
CSC - Computer Science
DAS - Dental Assisting
DEN - Dental Hygiene
EBL - Experience Based Learning
ECE - Education and Early Care
ECO - Economics
EDU - Education
ELT - Electrical Engineering Technology/Electronics
EMS - Emergency Medical Services
ENG - English Literature
ENG - English Writing
ENR - Engineering Science
ESL - English For Speakers Of Other Languages (ESOL)
FPT - Fire Protection Technology
FRE - French/Foreign Language
FSA - Food Service Administration
GEG - Geography
GEO - Geology
GEO 101 - Physical Geology-GR

4 Credits

This course focuses on the Earth's composition, features, and processes, including volcanoes, earthquakes, minerals, rocks, glaciers, caves, landslides, rivers, mountain building, and plate tectonics. Two field trips to study local geology are incorporated into lab each semester. Three class hours, three laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Apply Plate Tectonic Theory to a geologic setting.
2. Identify the role of geothermal energy in occurrence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.
3. Recognize features formed by interactions of Earth's subsystems.
4. Apply concepts related to the Rock Cycle.
5. Identify layers of the Earth.
6. Solve geologic problems utilizing age-determination techniques.
7. Identify the geologic processes that can cause natural hazards.
8. Interpret observations in the laboratory setting to identify rocks and minerals.
9. Interpret topographic maps to identify geologic features.
10. Analyze data in a field setting to answer geologic questions.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

GEO 102 - Historical Geology

4 Credits

Historical Geology is the study of the history of Earth and life through time. It addresses the Earth's origin, evolution, changes in the distribution of lands and seas, growth and destruction of mountains, succession of animals and plants through time, and the developmental history of the solar system. Three class hours, three laboratory hours, field trips.(SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite: GEO 101 or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Summarize the formation of the solar system.
2. Infer changes in sea level from stratigraphic sections.
3. Summarize the evolution of oceans and continents on the early Earth.
4. Identify collected fossil specimens.
5. Identify structures on geologic maps using strike and dip data.
6. Reconstruct ancient environments using rock hand samples.

Course Offered Spring only

GEO 103 - Great Mysteries of the Earth

3 Credits

This course investigates Earth mysteries to gain an understanding of the differences between science and pseudoscience. The student will learn and use critical thinking skills, logic, and the scientific method of inquiry to better understand allegedly unexplainable phenomena. This course will investigate topics related to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, extinction events, early engineering structures, plate tectonics, climate concerns, legendary creatures and enigmatic landforms. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Explain factors that affect the Earth's climate.
2. Use the plate tectonic theory to explain geologic activity.
3. Critically analyze an argument with an objective viewpoint.
4. Differentiate between a hypothesis and a scientific theory.
5. Develop a testable hypothesis.
6. Compare modern scientific findings to other interpretations of the natural world.
7. Analyze claims using deductive reasoning.
8. Differentiate between natural and human-induced climate change.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

GEO 105 - Astronomy

3 Credits

An introduction to general astronomy. Topics include: solar system, stellar energy, stellar evolution, galaxies, the universe and constellation identification. Three class hours. NOTE: Students who successfully complete GEO 105 may, with addition of GEO 115, complete the requirement of SUNY Natural Science General Education. GEO 115 may be taken concurrently or in a later semester, but the student will not have satisfied the SUNY requirement until both GEO 115 and GEO 105 are successfully completed. (SUNY-NS)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Produce an accurate diagram of the Solar System.
2. Define the electromagnetic spectrum.
3. Apply Wien’s Law to determine relationships between wavelength and temperature.
4. Compare and contrast refracting and reflecting telescopes.
5. Use a star finder/planisphere to identify key locations in the night sky.
6. Explain the causes of eclipses and lunar phases.
7. Use the absolute and apparent magnitudes of a star to determine its distance.
8. Use Kepler's Second Law to determine the orbital radius or period of an object.
9. Classify different types of stars using a temperature-luminosity diagram.
10. Describe the physical features of the Sun.
11. Explain the process by which the Sun generates its heat.
12. Explain current theories regarding the fate of the Universe.
13. Describe the overall evolution of the Sun as a main sequence star.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

GEO 106 - Introduction to Oceanography

3 Credits

An introductory course which will survey ocean sciences. Geological, chemical, physical, and biological processes and interrelationships will be examined. Course offered fall only. Three class hours. 3 Credits.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Recognize that many scientific disciplines contribute to the study of the oceans.
2. Explain physical ocean features using the Theory of Plate Tectonics.
3. Identify physical features of the sea floor such as its topography, sediment type and distribution, or available resources.
4. Describe the properties of water, emphasizing how these properties change in presence of salt.
5. Compare and contrast oceanic circulation to atmospheric circulation.
6. Explain the physical forces that affect circulation and stratification of the ocean.
7. Analyze the forces that influence waves and tides.
8. List the environmental factors that control the distribution of the marine life in the ocean.
9. Compare factors that influence coastal environments.
10. Evaluate threats to marine or coastal environments.

Course Offered Fall only

GEO 108 - Dangerous Earth (formerly GEO 137)

3 Credits

An introduction to the destructive power of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanos, hurricanes, tornadoes and related phenomena. The origin and occurrence of such hazards will be examined. Recent disasters as well as catastrophic events in the Earth's past will be utilized as case studies. Methods of prediction and strategies for minimizing loss of life and property will be emphasized. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Describe the differences between a natural process and a natural hazard.
2.Describe the relationship between natural hazards and population growth.
3.Explain the role of the Earth’s sub-systems in hazard occurrence.
4.Identify the distribution of hazards controlled by plate motion or atmospheric conditions.
5.Interpret field data to determine past and future hazards.
6.Determine precursors utilized in hazard prediction.
7.Identify methods used for monitoring potential hazards.
8.Identify methods used in hazard prevention.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

GEO 115 - Introductory Astronomy Laboratory

1 Credit

This course explores the hands-on, practical applications of basic knowledge gained in the companion course, GE0 105. Exercises involve use of telescopes, observation of stars and constellations, stellar spectra, Hubble red-shift, astrophotography, and computer based exercises. Three laboratory hours. NOTE: This course only meets SUNY General Education Natural Science requirements when both GEO 105 and GEO 115 are successfully completed. (SUNY-NS)

Co-requisite: GEO 105

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Create a scaled model of the solar system.
2. Use simulation software to create star charts for any given date and location.
3. Predict the location of celestial objects using a planisphere.
4. Measure the light spectra of stars or galaxies using a simulated spectrometer.
5. Determine the period or radial distance of an orbiting object, using Kepler's Second Law.
6. Evaluate the relative age of planetary surfaces.
7. Identify the general types of meteorites.
8. Determine the distance to a stellar object using its absolute and apparent magnitudes.
9. Plot stars on a temperature-luminosity diagram using data gathered from a simulated photometer.
10. Evaluate the likelihood of finding an Earth-like planet orbiting another star.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

GEO 116 - Special Topics in Geosciences

1-3 Credits

This course is designed to address specific topics of interest in the geosciences. Examples of potential course offerings could include volcanology, mineralogy, climate change, or the study of a particular geographic region. Topics may change from semester to semester based on faculty and student interest. Primarily lecture format, but field experiences may be included. Variable class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Summarize the cause and effect relationship of natural events relevant to topics addressed by this offering.
2. Utilize the scientific method as a predictive tool.
3. Evaluate the effects of human activity on the natural environment.
4. Compare and contrast case studies.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

GEO 200 - Geology of the National Parks (formerly GEO 150)

4 Credits

This lecture and laboratory course explores the geological processes and earth history responsible for the development of the iconic landscapes found within the National Parks System, including Arches, Bryce Canyon, Grand Canyon, Great Smokies, Mammoth Cave, Shenandoah, Yellowstone, Yosemite, Zion National Parks, and others. Three class hours, three laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS) Course offered Fall of odd years

Prerequisite: GEO 101 or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Summarize the purposes of creating national parks.
2. Identify iconic features preserved within national parks discussed in this course.
3. Identify rock and mineral samples present in some national parks.
4. Interpret data collected from topographic or geologic maps or geospatial imagery of national parks discussed in this course.
5. Explain the relationships among plate tectonics, the rock cycle, and landscapes preserved within parks covered by this course.
6. Predict how surficial processes will influence geologic features in the future based on observations.
7. Explain ways that human activities influence the preservation of the national parks.

Course Offered Fall only

GEO 203 - Geomorphology

4 Credits

A study of the genesis of land forms, resulting from the action of running water, glaciers, waves, wind, ground water, and other gradational agents. The approach is analytical in terms of structure, process, and stage. Alternate Spring semester only (of odd years). Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

Prerequisite: GEO 101 or permission of instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify landforms using topographic maps or aerial photographs.
2. Classify fluvial, aeolian, karst, coastal or glacial landforms.
3. Explain the processes of landform development over time.
4. Predict changes in existing surfaces based on subsurface geology or climatic conditions.
5. Use the Plate Tectonic Model to explain landform evolution.
6. Describe how climate change affects landform evolution.
7. Collect field data using geomorphological techniques.
8. Analyze geo-spatial data collected in the field.
9. Use knowledge of surface processes to analyze problems in related fields.

Course Offered Spring only

GEO 204 - Introduction to Mineralogy

4 Credits

A study of the formation, occurrence and association of minerals with an emphasis on mineral identification through the study of their chemical, physical and crystallographic properties. Three class hours, three laboratory hours.

Prerequisites: GEO 101 and CHE 100 or permission of the instructor.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Differentiate among the six major crystallographic groups.
2. Distinguish the various elements of symmetry that define crystallographic structure.
3. Describe several physical and chemical techniques used in mineral identification.
4. Identify specimens of at least 75 distinct mineral species.
5. Classify mineral specimens on the basis of their chemical composition and mineral group.
6. Recall the primary uses of economic mineral species.
7. Correlate different mineral species by their common associations.
8. Demonstrate proper technique in collecting mineral specimens in the field.

Course Offered Fall only

GEO 210 - Environmental Geology

4 Credits

This lecture and laboratory course will center around an in-depth discussion about the environment as related to resources, wastes, pollution, and geologic hazards. The consequences of use and misuse of our geologic environment will be stressed and explored in more depth in weekly laboratories. Three class hours, three laboratory hours. (SUNY-NS). Course offered Spring of even years.

Prerequisite: GEO 101

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify the role of plate tectonics in the formation of Earth features.
2. Describe the origins of natural resources.
3. Compare and contrast alternative energy resources.
4. Identify point or non-point sources of pollution.
5. Describe potential solutions to environmental problems.
6. Explain the distribution of natural hazards.
7. Describe how human activities affect natural hazards.
8. Identify Earth materials including rocks and minerals.
9. Interpret maps, charts, or graphs that illustrate problems in environmental geology.
10. Test water or soil chemistry.
11. Identify potential hazards using geologic field data.

Course Offered Spring only

GEO 220 - Geology of New York State

4 Credits

The geological history of the state will be studied chronologically from the Precambrian Eon to the Pleistocene Epoch. The geology of Monroe County and the Genesee River region will be stressed. Three class hours, three lab hours. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisite(s): One semester of physical geography OR any geology course is recommended except GEO 103 or GEO 105.

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Summarize the tectonic history of the East Coast of North America.
2. Describe the orogenic (mountain building) process.
3. Identify the physiographic provinces of New York State.
4. Interpret changes in depositional/tectonic history of New York State using age-determination techniques.
5. Identify rocks, fossils, or rock structures commonly found in New York State.
6. Use congruent rock facies and structures to construct a stratigraphic map.
7. Compare glacial landforms to glacier-related processes.
8. Explain how past continental ice-sheets have modified the modern-day landscape.

Course Offered Spring only

GEO 290 - Independent Study

Variable Credit

See the Department Chairperson.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

GEO 295 - Field Studies in the Geosciences

Variable Credit

This course is designed for students who wish to study a specific geologic or geographic topic or locality in a focused, hands-on, field setting. A significant portion of the course work is completed in the field at a local or distant location depending upon the title and focus of the course for a given semester. Students will make field observations, create sketches, record data, and construct a field notebook detailing all aspects of their field experience. The course title will have a sub-title attached to it for any given semester identifying the field setting for that semester. Two examples include "Field Studies in the Geosciences/Volcanic Landscapes of the Western US" or "Field Studies in the Geosciences/Geologic History of the Pacific Northwest". Additional fees for travel, lodging, food, and other field expenses may apply. Credit hours are variable depending upon the field experience offered. (SUNY-NS)

Prerequisites: One Geology or Geography class preferred; permission of the instructor(s) required

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Identify geological, geographical, biological, or chemical factors that shape the field setting.
2. Record scientific observations at a particular field setting.
3. Interpret field observations to determine geologic history.
4. Utilize scientific equipment in the collection of field data.
5. Construct a scientific notebook containing field observations.
6. Execute field-based projects.
7. Report results of field-based scientific projects.
8. Identify the influence of plate tectonics in a given field setting.

Course Offered Spring only

GER - German/Foreign Language
GLF - Golf Management
HBR - Hebrew/Foreign Language
HED - Health Education
HEG - Health Education Global
HIM - Health Information Technology
HIS - History
HMN - Humanities
HON - Honors Studies
HPR - Health Professions
HSM - Homeland Security Administration
HSP - Hospitality
HTL - Hotel Technology
HUM - Human Services
HVA - Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning
IDE - Interior Design
ITA - Italian/Foreign Language
JPN - Japanese/Foreign Language
LAW - Law
LDS - Leadership
MAR - Marketing
MET - Mechanical Technology
MFG - Manufacturing Technology: Automation / Robotics
MTH - Mathematics
MUS - Music
NUR - Nursing
OFT - Office Technology
OPT - Optical Systems Technology
PE - Physical Education--Coed
PEC - Physical Education--Coed
PEJ - Physical Education-Criminal Justice
PEM - Physical Education--Men
PEW - Physical Education-Women
PHL - Philosophy
PHO - Photography
PHY - Physics
PLE - Police: Law Enforcement
PLS - Paralegal Studies
POR - Portuguese/Foreign Language
POS - Political Science
PPE - Physical Studies/Physical Education
PSC - Public Safety Communications
PSC - Public Safety Training
PST - Public Safety Training
PSY - Psychology
REA - Reading
SBS - Honors Studies
SBS - Social & Behavioral Sciences
SCI - Science
SCR - Computer Security
SGT - Surgical Technology
SMT - Sports Management
SOC - Sociology
SPA - Spanish/Foreign Language
SPC - Speech Communication
STT - Solar Thermal Technology
SUS - Sustainability Studies
SVL - Service Learning
TAM - Tooling and Machining
TEK - Technology
THE - Theatre
TOY - Toyota
TRS - Transitional Studies
TVL - Travel And Tourism
XRT - Radiologic Technology