Course Descriptions

The following is a complete listing of courses offered at MCC. You can also visit our Programs of Study page for a list of course requirements necessary to complete your degree.

AAD - Applied Art and Design
ACC - Accounting
ACD - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency
AGS - Agricultural Studies
ANT - Anthropology
ARA - Arabic/Foreign Language
ART - Art
ASL - American Sign Language/Foreign Language
ATP - Automotive Technology
BIO - Biology
BUS - Business
CDL - Interdisciplinary
CE - Cooperative Education-Disney World
CE - Hospitality
CE - Office Technology
CEL - Leadership
CHE - Chemistry
CHI - Chinese/Foreign Language
CIN - Cinema Studies
CIS - Computer Information Systems
CIT - Civil and Construction Technology
CLT - Clinical Laboratory Technician
COM - Communication
COS - College Success
CPT - Computer Technology
CRC - Computer Related Curricula
CRJ - Criminal Justice
CSC - Computer Science
DAS - Dental Assisting
DEN - Dental Hygiene
EBL - Experience Based Learning
ECE - Education and Early Care
ECO - Economics
EDU - Education
ELT - Electrical Engineering Technology/Electronics
EMS - Emergency Medical Services
ENG - English Literature
ENG - English Writing
ENR - Engineering Science
ESL - English For Speakers Of Other Languages (ESOL)
FPT - Fire Protection Technology
FRE - French/Foreign Language
FSA - Food Service Administration
GEG - Geography
GEO - Geology
GER - German/Foreign Language
GLF - Golf Management
HBR - Hebrew/Foreign Language
HED - Health Education
HEG - Health Education Global
HIM - Health Information Technology
HIS - History
HMN - Humanities
HON - Honors Studies
HPR - Health Professions
HSM - Homeland Security Administration
HSP - Hospitality
HTL - Hotel Technology
HUM - Human Services
HVA - Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning
IDE - Interior Design
ITA - Italian/Foreign Language
JPN - Japanese/Foreign Language
LAW - Law
LDS - Leadership
MAR - Marketing
MET - Mechanical Technology
MFG - Manufacturing Technology: Automation / Robotics
MTH - Mathematics
MUS - Music
NUR - Nursing
OFT - Office Technology
OPT - Optical Systems Technology
PE - Physical Education--Coed
PEC - Physical Education--Coed
PEJ - Physical Education-Criminal Justice
PEM - Physical Education--Men
PEW - Physical Education-Women
PHL - Philosophy
PHL 101 - Introduction to Philosophy - WR

3 Credits

An introduction to the fundamental questions of philosophy, including such issues as determinism, freedom, and responsibility; the relationship of mind to body; the grounds and limits of human knowledge; and the existence and nature of God. Three class hours. (SUNY-H)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Analyze a philosophical argument.
2. Create a philosophical argument.
3. Defend a philosophical argument.
4. Apply key concepts central to the study of academic philosophy.
5. Summarize complex readings in philosophy.
6. Analyze influential philosophical questions or problems.
7. Defend a philosophical argument in writing.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHL 102 - Introduction to Logic - WR

3 Credits

A study of the inductive and deductive processes of reasoning in the light of classical and contemporary thought, including the analysis of ordinary language and its pitfalls, and the relation of logic to scientific inquiry and method. Three class hours. (SUNY-H)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Analyze an argument for common problems associated with poor reasoning and inference.
2. Apply key concepts central to the study of logic.
3. Interpret readings in philosophy or logic.
4. Apply basic rules and techniques of formal, informal, or symbolic logic.
5. Write exercise sets in formal, informal, or symbolic logic.

Course Offered Spring only

PHL 103 - Introduction to Ethics - WR

3 Credits

An introduction to basic problems in ethics, emphasizing theories of the good life, the morally good person, and morally right action, and their application to the most significant ethical questions in contemporary society, such as abortion, euthanasia, human sexuality, social and economic justice, violence, and use of the environment. Three class hours. (SUNY-H)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Analyze a philosophical argument on a specific moral or ethical problem.
2. Create a philosophical argument on a specific moral or ethical problem.
3. Defend a philosophical argument on a specific moral or ethical problem.
4. Apply key concepts central to the study of moral philosophy.
5. Summarize complex readings in philosophical ethics.
6. Analyze influential questions or problems in moral philosophy.
7. Defend a philosophical argument in writing.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHL 105 - Technology and Values - GR - WR

3 Credits

A study of the ways that the advance of technology relates to the development of values. The course will investigate how we evaluate and respond to technology, and will examine technology's impact upon such values as freedom, individuality, growth, work, and the political process. The course includes topics that computer science and engineering technology students need to understand, such as: the unique ethical problems in information technology; ethical practices to minimize computer misuse; ACM/IEEE Software Engineering Codes of Ethics and Professional Practice; the morality of software piracy; hacking and viruses as well as questions raised by globalization. Three class hours. (SUNY-H)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Analyze an argument on a specific philosophical issue related to technology.
2. Create a philosophical argument on an issue related to technology.
3. Defend a philosophical argument on an issue related to technology.
4. Apply key concepts central to the study of ethics and the philosophy of technology.
5. Summarize complex readings in ethics and philosophy of technology.
6. Analyze relevant moral dilemmas using the case study method.
7. Analyze influential questions or problems in ethics and philosophy of technology.
8. Defend an argument in the study of ethics and the philosophy of technology in writing.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHL 108 - World Religions: Western Traditions - WR

3 Credits

An introduction to the academic study of religion through the exploration of some of the major Western religious traditions of the world. This course examines the historical development, the fundamental doctrines and beliefs, practices, institutions, and cultural expressions of Western religious traditions. This course also addresses some of the essential differences and similarities that exist among Western religious traditions, and points to the uniqueness of each of them. The course includes the examination of ancient religious culture, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a humanities or social science elective. Three class hours. (SUNY-WC/H)

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Distinguish among different kinds of theories of religion.
2.Interpret phenomena found in Western Religions using concepts from religious studies, theology, philosophy, or the social sciences.
3.Explain origins and historical development of Western religions.
4.Describe social structures associated with various Western religions (i.e. institutions, economy, society).
5.Differentiate among conceptions of humanity, divinity, cosmos, duty, virtue, and community (i.e., culture) in various Western religions.
6.Explain the spread of Western religions to other parts of the world.
7.Explain the spread of religions originating in other parts of the world in the Western hemisphere.
8.Evaluate personal character based on standards of virtue found in Western religions.
9.Write a plan for personal character development based on standards of virtue found in Western religions.

Course Offered Fall only

PHL 109 - World Religions: Eastern Traditions - WR

3 Credits

An introduction to the academic study of religion through the exploration of some of the major Eastern religious traditions of the world. This course examines the historical development, the fundamental doctrines and beliefs, practices, institutions, and cultural expressions of Eastern religious traditions. This course also addresses some of the essential differences and similarities that exist among Eastern religious traditions, and points to the uniqueness of each of them. The course includes an examination of the differences in Eastern and Western thought, Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. This course fulfills the MCC requirement for a humanities or social science elective. Three class hours. (SUNY-H/OWC)

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Distinguish among different kinds of theories of religion.
2.Interpret phenomena found in Asian religions using concepts from religious studies, philosophy, theology, or the social sciences.
3.Explain institutional structures associated with various religions originating in Asia.
4.Describe social structures associated with various religions originating in Asia (i.e., political, economic).
5.Differentiate conceptions of humanity, divinity, cosmos, duty, virtue, and community (i.e., culture) in various religions originating in Asia.
6.Recall the origins and development of various religions originating in Asia (i.e., history).
7.Explain the spread of religions originating in Asia to other parts of the world.
8.Explain the spread of religions originating in other parts of the world into Asia.
9.Evaluate personal character based on standards of virtue found in religions originating in Asia.
10.Plan personal character development based on standards of virtue found in religions originating in Asia.

Course Offered Spring only

PHL 210 - Human Rights and Democracy in Domestic and International Contexts - GR - WR

3 Credits

This course introduces students to (i) the general conceptual and normative claims of democracy and the modern human rights movement and (ii) specific problems of democracy and human rights. General issues include the role and limits of national sovereignty and the moral and legal bases of human rights. Specific problems are drawn from among the following: genocide and humanitarian intervention, global poverty, religious liberty and religious tolerance, feminism and the roles of women, cultural differences in conceptions of democracy and human rights. We study both conceptual and practical issues in democracy and human rights. Three class hours.

Course Learning Outcomes
1.Explain how concepts of democracy arose in or were introduced to at least one non-Western civilization. (history)
2.Summarize the relationships between human rights and central values of at least one non-Western civilization. (culture)
3.Compare central political concepts in Western political thought and central concepts in at least one form of non-Western political thought. (culture, society)
4.Explain differences in Western and non-Western understandings of globally endorsed concepts in political philosophy.
5.Evaluate theories of distributive justice that incorporate Western and non-Western concepts. (economics, institutions)
6.Compare theories of individual rights in Western and non-Western civilizations. (culture, society)
7.Evaluate constraints on property rights in at least one non-Western civilization. (institutions, economy)
8.Explain how concepts of human rights arose in or were introduced to at least one non-Western civilization. (history)

Course Offered Fall only

PHL 250 - Professional Ethics - WR

3 Credits

A study of ethical principles and of ethical problems in the professional world. The course is intended to provide students with the ability to analyze ethical situations within a specific profession such as health care, business, and public administration. The course includes lectures, discussions, case analyses, the study of codes of ethics, and individual projects. The topic for each semester is indicated in the course title. The course may not be repeated for additional credit hours. Three class hours. (SUNY-H)

Course Learning Outcomes
1. Analyze a philosophical argument on a specific problem or question in professional ethics.
2. Apply specific ethical theories to current social issues using the case-study method.
3. Apply specific ethical theories to examples of institutional or interpersonal conflict using the case-study method.
4. Apply key concepts central to the study of professional ethics.
5. Summarize complex readings in professional ethics.
6. Discuss significant questions or problems in contemporary professional ethics.
7. Defend an argument in professional ethics in writing.

Course Offered Spring only

PHL 290 - Independent Study

Variable Credit

See the Department Chairperson.

Course Offered Fall and Spring

PHO - Photography
PHY - Physics
PLE - Police: Law Enforcement
PLS - Paralegal Studies
POR - Portuguese/Foreign Language
POS - Political Science
PPE - Physical Studies/Physical Education
PSC - Public Safety Communications
PSC - Public Safety Training
PST - Public Safety Training
PSY - Psychology
REA - Reading
SBS - Honors Studies
SBS - Social & Behavioral Sciences
SCI - Science
SCR - Computer Security
SGT - Surgical Technology
SMT - Sports Management
SOC - Sociology
SPA - Spanish/Foreign Language
SPC - Speech Communication
STT - Solar Thermal Technology
SUS - Sustainability Studies
SVL - Service Learning
TAM - Tooling and Machining
TEK - Technology
THE - Theatre
TOY - Toyota
TRS - Transitional Studies
TVL - Travel And Tourism
XRT - Radiologic Technology